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Thread: FAQ and Information about Honda CB400 Revo NC42

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    SparkerS1
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    Default FAQ and Information about Honda CB400 Revo NC42

    Content page for quick reference and access:

    1) Specification and General Information about CB400 Revo Post #2

    2) Spec III Service Manual & Spec III / Revo Owner’s Manual for reference or download Post #3

    3) SparkerS1’s CB400 Revo Servicing & Maintenance Schedule Post #4

    4) SparkerS1's Engine Oil change interval and personal opinion Post #5

    5) My feedback on modifications & accessories done Post #6

    6) Revo Model/Series, HISS & VTEC Post #7

    7) Hard Break-In / Normal Running-In Post #8

    8) How to set time & calculate Fuel Consumption Post #9

    9) Features & Parts (I) Post #10

    10) Features & Parts (II) Post #11

    11) Maintenance-Free Battery Post #12

    12) Q&A related to the bike (I) Post #13

    13) Q&A related to the bike (II) Post #14

    14) Q&A related to the bike (III) Post #15

    15) Q&A related to the bike (IV) Post #16

    16) Q&A related to the bike (V) Post #17

    17) DIY Section - Speedometer Bulbs Post #18

    18) DIY Section - How to open & remove the fuel tank Post #19

    19) DIY Section Post #20

    20) Recall for owners of CB400 from Honda Post #21

    21) Honda CB400 Project Big One Post #22

    22) Motorcycle Safety Education Post #23

    23) SparkerS1's Additional Motorcycle Information Post #24

    24) SparkerS1's Comparison between Honda CB400 Revo & Suzuki DRZ400SM Post #25

    25) Pictures & Photos (I) Post #26

    26) Pictures & Photos (II) Post #27

    27) Pictures & Photos (III) Post #28

    28) Pictures & Photos (IV) Post #29

    29) Pictures & Photos (V) Post #30

    30) Godsendworx Custom Radiator Guard Post #31

    31) Useful Websites Post #32

    Last edited by SparkerS1; 31-05-2013 at 05:20 PM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default Specification and General Information about CB400 Revo

    Engine and transmission

    Displacement: 399.00 ccm (24.35 cubic inches)

    Engine type: In-line four, four-stroke

    Power: 52.30 HP (38.2 kW)) @ 10500 RPM

    Torque: 38.00 Nm (3.9 kgf-m or 28.0 ft.lbs) @ 9500 RPM

    Bore x stroke: 55.0 x 42.0 mm (2.2 x 1.7 inches)

    Fuel system: Injection. PGM-FI

    Fuel control: DOHC

    Ignition: Full transistor type

    Lubrication system: Combined pumping spray

    Cooling system: Liquid

    Gearbox: 6-speed

    Transmission type/final drive: Chain / 15F 44R

    Clutch: Wet multi-plate coil spring


    Chassis, suspension, brakes and wheels

    Trail: 90 mm (3.5 inches)

    Front suspension: Telescopic fork

    Rear suspension: Swing arm

    Front tyre dimensions: 120/60-ZR17

    Rear tyre dimensions: 160/60-ZR17

    Front brakes: Double disc. Hydraulic, Anti-lock brake(ABS optional)

    Rear brakes: Single disc. Hydraulic


    Physical measures and capacities

    Dry weight: 199.0 kg (438.7 pounds)

    Power/weight ratio: 0.2628 HP/kg

    Seat height: 755 mm (29.7 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting.

    Overall height: 1,070 mm (42.1 inches)

    Overall length: 2,040 mm (80.3 inches)

    Overall width: 725 mm (28.5 inches)

    Ground clearance: 130 mm (5.1 inches)

    Wheelbase: 1,560 mm (61.4 inches)

    Fuel capacity: 18.00 litres (4.76 gallons), including 4 litres reserve
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 26-05-2013 at 07:56 PM. Reason: Updating

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default Owner’s Manual for reference or download

    CB400 Spec III
    CB400 Super Four Hyper VTEC SpecIII Owner's Manual
    Copy of the manual available here

    CB400 Super Four Hyper VTEC SpecIII Service Manual
    Copy of the manual available here


    CB400 Revo
    CB400 Super Four Hyper VTEC Revo Owner's Manual
    Copy of the manual available here
    *****Choose slow download & wait for download to commence then click download again. Please edit filename in order to open the PDF *****

    CB400 Super Four Hyper VTEC Revo Owner's Manual
    Copy of the manual available here
    *** Fast View & Download ***


    Last edited by SparkerS1; 26-05-2013 at 08:01 PM. Reason: Updating

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default SparkerS1’s CB400 Revo Servicing & Maintenance Schedule

    Running in: Normal Running-in (Refer to service manual) or hard-break in

    Spark Plug: CR8EH-9(NGK) (Normal spark plug can last at least 10,000km, NGK CR8EHIX or NGK CR9EHIX Iridium can last at least 20,000km)

    Engine Oil: Semi-synthetic change every 3500km, Fully-synthetic change every 7000km (Can +/- up to 2000km depending on riding/traffic/weather conditions)

    Oil Filter: Change every 2-3 EO change depending on service interval or every 10-12km

    Air Filter: Service once a year or every 20,000km (Use aftermarket filters for cost saving and better air flow)

    Coolant: Flush at least once a year or every 20,000km (Best to monitor and change the coolant if necessary due the nature of the excessive heat produced)

    Brake Hose: Bleed at least once a year or as when needed

    Fork Oil: Change every 2 years or 20,000km

    Tire Pressure: Front 225kpa, Rear 250kpa (without pillon)
    Front 250kpa, Rear 290kpa (with pillon)

    Fuel Tank: Full tank 18L with 4L reserve

    Brake Pad: EBC brake pads FA296HH(Front X 2) and FA174(Rear X 1)

    Engine oil needed when changing them:
    Without changing oil filter / change oil filter
    Project big - 2.8 litres / 3 litres
    Version S - 2.8 litres / 3 litres
    Spec 1 - 3 llitres / 3.2 litres
    Spec 2 - 3 litres / 3.2 litres
    Spec 3 - 3 litres / 3.2 litres
    Revo - 3 litres / 3.2 litres

    ************************************************** ***********

    Disclaimer:
    This is my personal servicing & maintenance schedule which I would like to share with everyone.
    This can be served as a guide or reference for beginners or even seasoned riders.
    Please do not quote me or argue about my servicing intervals.
    You might have different servicing intervals due to different riding/traffic/weather conditions, different riding techniques or track racing.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 26-05-2013 at 08:00 PM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default SparkerS1's Engine Oil change interval and personal opinion

    Don't you guys feel that Honda never revise its CB400 oil change interval for Revo in the owner's manual?

    Currently dealing with EFI Revo and not those Carb S4 models.
    High idling speed for EFI bikes which generate more heat.
    Singapore climate is different from Japan.
    Singapore riding condition is also different due to many stop & go intervals when encountering traffic jams.
    Weather/dusty road condition and Heat will speed up EO degrading process.
    To me Preventive is always better than corrective.

    My GSXR manual states every 6000km mileage oil change interval. Why not Suzuki use the 10k mileage for oil change for their EFI bikes?
    Suzuki engine not as comparable and durable compared to Honda engine? I beg to differ.
    GSXR & Revo both are 4 cylinder 16 valve engine, just different engine capacity and combustion rates.

    The service intervals in the CB400 Maintenance Schedule are based on average riding conditions. Some items will need more frequent service if you ride in unusually wet or dusty areas, or if you often accelerate quickly and use full throttle.
    http://motorcycle.honda.ca/parts-ser...ance-schedules

    I rode Spec I-III before so I am able compare how much the difference between EFI Revo with Carb CB400.

    I never insist on the oil change interval for the general public, I only sharing my knowledge/opinions on why I don't follow the manual blindly on certain issues.

    Click here to view the oil change interval & feedbacks of CB400 riders.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 07:59 AM.

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    Default My feedback on modifications & accessories done

    What modifications are done on my 2008 Honda Super4 CB400 NC42:

    - Crash Bar/Engine Guard
    - Fuel Cap Pad
    - Race Shield
    - Power Abuser 2
    - Power Abuser Ignite
    - Grounding Wired
    - HEL Brake Hose (Front & Rear)
    - Predator Face Mask
    - Rim Sticker
    - Belly Pan/ Lower Cowling
    - Rear Hugger/ Rear Fender
    - Front Fork Slider
    - Radiator & Coolant Reserve using Engine ICE
    - NGK Iridium Spark Plug
    - K&N Air Filter
    - Armed with Scropio 1 way Alarm
    - Stebel Magnum Horn
    - Fork Brace
    - GPR Endcan

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    What modifications are done on on my Honda Super4 CB400 NC42: Black Gen 2011

    <PERFORMANCE>
    - Racewerks Dyno Hard Break-In ; Save the time & effort on normal running-in, pistons set in better in a controlled environment

    - Power Abuser Auto ; Maximized power output, Better response, Better spark plug firing resulting in a more complete combustion, Lessen the harsh engine braking feel, Brighter lightings, Extend battery lifespan

    - 5 Point Grounding ; Direct the stray current back to the battery, Better response, Better mileage, Extend battery lifespan

    - K&N Air Filter ; Better airflow & filtration for a cleaner & better combustion
    For S4, no difference if compared between K&N and BMC, both are aftermarket air filters which perform a lot better than stock filter.
    Better air flow and better filtration. Best of all it's long lasting and washable. Save money in long term and increase performance.

    - Brembo RCS19 Master Pump with Rizoma Brake Reservoir / Rizoma SS Adjustable Reservoir Bracket ; Better braking efficiency & feel, Least braking effort, ease of monitoring brake fluid level

    - Bitubo Steering damper + Bitubo mount + DMV bracket for CB400 ; More stable handling of the bike, High speed riding with ease, Prevents tankslap, Stiffen the handling for ideal control, 18 clicks damping setting(CB400 8-10 Click), Perfect Fit for CB400 (Damper will not hit the tank when left/right turn fully), Fully serviceable and rebuildable for long life.

    - Yoshimura R77 Titanium Blue Slip-On Exhaust ; Lighter than Original Stock Exhaust, Better Emission Flow from Combustion Chamber, More Robust Sound compared to Original Stock Exhaust, Not as hot when compared with stock endcan.

    - Ballistic Battery ; 2x lighter, 2x more powerful, 2x more durable than original MF battery. Smaller size than original battery but packed with 2x more efficiency.


    <PROTECTION>
    - Seng Kwang Crash Bar/Engine Guard ; Basic protection for external engine casing, custom made Stainless Steel

    - Equipment Extreme Front & Rear Axle Slider ; Additional Protection for the fork and swing-arm

    - Motivation Heavy Type Bar-End Sliders ; Additional Protection for the bike, Reduce vibration and improved stability on the handle bar, Improved handling

    - Godsend Customized Radiator Mesh ; Protect the radiator fins from sands, rocks and other road debris, Prevent the radiator from damage, Personalized design can be done on the mesh

    - Raceshield Partial Body Kit by Juzzwheels ; Tough & strong film which provides protection/scratches

    - APA Exhaust Slider ; Resists wear/heat and helps protect muffler, much like a frame slider does.

    - R&G Exhaust Slider ; Resists wear/heat and helps protect muffler, much like a frame slider does.


    <ACCESSORIES>
    - EBC HH Front & Rear Brake Pads ; EBC brake pads FA296HH(Front X 2) and FA174(Rear X 1) ;Better braking efficiency, Reduce heat transfer compared to normal brake pads

    - STAR Performance Brake Hose (Front & Rear) ; Steel braided brake hose, Better braking feel, Will not expand as much as normal rubber hose

    - Metzeler Sportec M5 tires ; Great grip on wet/dry conditions

    - Bridgeport Tire Valves ; Ease of inflating the tires, Better quality & fit, A variety of colours to choose from

    - Tapered wheel bearings ; Better quality, More durable & longer lifespan compared with normal ball bearings, Improve stability & handling

    - Fork Brace ; Improve stability & handling, Improved cornering stability

    - Bagster Customized Tank Bra ; Can attach a tank bag, Personalized design for a more "streetfighter" appearance

    - Juzzwheelz Reflective Rim Sticker & Godsend CF IU sticker ; For personalized design

    - TurboMag Oil filter Magnet ; To filter ferrous particles from engine oil, Reusable and transferable

    - EvoTech Oil filler Plug ; Enhance the look/styling of the bike, Better quality compared with stock rubber cap, Can attach safety wire for racing or hard-street riding purposes.

    - ASV Unbreakable Clutch lever ; Customized & enhanced appearance, Will not break (Bent instead) so as in order to continue riding to bike shop for replacement. Shorty version.

    - PROTI security bolts ; Titanium & non-corrosive, Lighter & stronger than OEM bolts, Security feature to deter theft of parts.


    <SERVICING>
    - NGK Iridium Spark Plug CR9EIX ; Better & more precise spark plug firing, Longer life span

    - Motul 300V Factoryline 4T Engine Oil ; Better lubrication & protection for internal engine components

    - K&N Oil Filter ; Heavy duty construction, high flow rates, & outstanding oil filtration

    - Radiator & Coolant Reserve using Special Blend Coolant & Water Wetter; Better quality coolant for the bike, Reduce engine overheating

    - STP Fuel Additives (Gas treatment, Octane Booster, Fuel system cleaner) ; Used once a month (View STP website @ http://www.stp.com/ for more details)

    - Latest Fuel Consumption: 22 km/L
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:03 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default Revo Model/Series, HISS & VTEC

    Agent & PI models ~ ~ ~ ABS & Non-ABS Models:
    To let all have more insight on the market research on the Revo, here are some point to take note;-
    - There are 2 versions of the Revo (not including the Bor' or) and the cost is between $800 to $1000 more

    * With ABS (actually is CBS)
    * Without ABS

    - In Sg, there is agent bike (Boon Siew) and Parallel Import (PI) bike & same there is a cost difference of $700 to $1000 more getting the agent bike

    * Chasis no JHxxxxxx for agent bike, sticker & manual in English
    * Chasis no NCxxxxx for PI bike, sticker & manual in Japanese

    As for the bike itself, introducing the PGM-FI to the 400 is nothing new as this technology is proven.
    It starts smoothly with auto-choke for about 55 sec before the rev stabilise.
    Acceleration wise is smooth and responsive, a different experience compare to the carb model.
    But this bike definitely runs high in temperature often triggering the fan to be on.

    The grey engine & crankcase Revo series was launched initially back in 2008 till 2010. Subsequently since 2010, the black engine & crankcase Revo series was marketed till present.
    The specs between the grey & black series are the same except for the colour scheme of the engine & crankcase.

    For PI bike, some shops give their own 1 or 6 months warranty.
    Agent is 6months or 1yr warranty or 6000km mileage or 10000km mileage or whichever comes first.

    Got to check the T&C because every shop has their own business tactics and term conditions.

    Agent bikes, any faulty components from Honda, they will recall and replace FOC.
    Check Boon Siew website for newest updates.
    PI bikes, you are on your own till the faulty component broke down, you pay and change.


    HISS:
    Honda Ignition Security System.
    This system only allows the bike key with the chip encoded(program) to be use to start the engine.
    No program NO start.
    There is a micro-chip install in the key that must be programed(encoded) to the device inside your bike.
    Maximum of 4 keys can be encoded only for the bike and all keys have to be synchronized to the same set of code.


    VTEC:
    When does Vtec opens for Revo?
    6300 RPM for first 5 gear and 6750 RPM for the last gear.

    When does Vtec opens for other CB400 models?
    VTEC 1 = 6700 RPM
    VTEC 2 = 6350 RPM
    VTEC 3 / Revo = 6350 RPM for first 5 gear and 6750 RPM for the last gear.

    My Fuel Consumption now: 20km/L(Half of the time open Vtec)
    22km/L(20% of the time open Vtec)
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:05 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default Hard Break-In / Normal Running-In

    Hard Break-In / Normal Running-In:
    Personal Preference on choosing the different methods of running-in the bike.
    Both my Revo went through hard break in, saves time running in, controlled environment using a Dyno machine helps the pistons to bed in easier n faster.
    The price for dyno hard break includes new Engine Oil & Oil Filter as u need to change these as well. Price range around $80-120 depending on the brand & cost of the Engine Oil & Oil Filter. The dyno specialized shops will advise you on the initial EO change interval thereafter.
    If you prefer normal running-in, please refer to the Owner's Manual & follow the instructions stated.
    As for Normal run-in, follow the manual or my recommendation is to change at 300-500km(mineral EO & new oil filter), 2000km, 5000km using semi-synthetic EO and new oil filter. Subsequently, change EO at normal oil interval after running-in referring to the owner’s manual or at owner’s discretion.

    Based on the Hard Break in data for new Spec 3 and Revo from Racewerks Dyno Research:
    The REVO accelerated faster to 8k rpm than a Spec 3 in all gears.
    Gearing is the same.
    No definitive consumption figures on the REVO yet.

    Idling on Revo is around 1400rpm. EFI bike’s idling is slightly higher than those carb model bikes.
    Try not to adjust the idling lower as might result in frequent engine stall problems.

    Auto-choke function on an ECU equipped EFI motorcycle.
    This kicks in when starting a cold engine whereby the engine idles at about 2k-2.3k RPM during the warming up process.
    Within a minute or so, the RPM gradually come down to about 1.4k, its idling speed when warmed up.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:06 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default How to set time & calculate Fuel Consumption

    How to set time at the meter?
    On ignition, press the two buttons for few seconds then u can set time.
    Once set, off ignition to save the setting


    How to calculate Fuel consumption in km/L ?
    First, top up your tank to the brim, squeeze as much as you can from petrol pump.
    Then reset your odometer & just ride until the fuel gauge reads reserve.
    Go to pump again till brim,
    take & record the mileage(km), dividing the amount of petrol(L) you pump.

    Try a few more times to get the average result.
    This method is quite accurate to me as I do not have a fuel guage on my past bikes.
    I pump based on mileage
    and I normally do get the right mileage with the amount of petrol pumped.
    The reason why calculating by mileage alone is not accurate as different bikes got different tank capacity.

    ie: a wave125(carb) can run abt 180km before reserve, the mileage is short, doesn't mean it's not fuel efficient.
    when pump to full, it only needs 4L, making the FC at 45km/L.

    FC depends on various factors, sprocket sizing, tuning, weight of load, riding condition and technique etc
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 26-05-2013 at 09:11 PM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default Feature & Parts (I)

    Fuel Cap:
    Changing the fuel cap including the key hole?
    Boon Siew Parts counter, $171(Not including installation) for original part as dated on Dec 2011.
    Charges applies for installation.


    Alternator:
    Generate AC current to Rectifier.


    Rectifier:
    Convert AC current from alternator to DC current and use them or store them to the battery.


    Grounding:
    Grounding cable is to produce better flow of the electrical current back to the battery negative terminal, via the lower resistance paths.

    Enhancement
    • Easier engine starting
    • Smoother engine, due to better ignition leads to improve fuel consumption
    • Improved power (in most of the case, gain back the lost power due to insufficient/inefficient
    stock grounding)
    • Improved engine response (due to fewer loads on the alternator after improving the charging
    efficiency)
    • Brighter and more stable head light intensity
    • Miscellaneous electrical improvements on the gauges, sensors etc.

    HISS, alarm and any other extra load to the battery circuitry also contributes to battery drain from prolonged parking.
    It is also known that if one of the base of the rectifier earth (one of the bolts) is link direct to the battery terminal, charging of the battery is more effiecient and consistence

    Anything that is resistive existing on a bike body (from chassis to bolts, nuts etc..) with reference to the battery negative ground and is not a "constant".
    The tendency is different earth potential and voltage drops across them.

    Correct grounding would zero all different earth potential to 1 single earth point.
    That's the battery negative reference (grounding).

    The question should be how good and effective it should be?
    Depending on circuit design quality from components to provision of high output ACC (cold current) to overide resistive values that can still provide to electrical load demand from the bike in usage.


    Relays:
    Built to take the more powerful electrical surge needed by items like horns or lights. A relay is a safer approach to electrical switching and it enables the maximum amount of power to be fed to the device.


    Throttle body
    It is the part of the air intake system that controls the amount of air flowing into the engine, in response to throttling input.
    The throttle body is usually located between the air filter box and the intake manifold.
    There is the butterfly valve that regulates the airflow.

    A throttle body is somewhat analogous to the carburettor in a non-injected engine.
    Carburettors combine the functionality of the throttle body and fuel injectors into one in order to modulate the amount of air flow and to combine air and fuel together.


    Throttle Position Sensor (TPS)
    It is to directly monitor the position of the throttle.
    A faulty TPS might lead to Irregular idling of the bike(Low idling, engine dies off while changing gears).
    Changing the TPS can solve the problem instead of changing the whole throttle body.


    Injectors
    So fuel goes into fuel tank, which is pumped by fuel pump to the injectors which use high pressure to inject the fuel into the throttle body in a fine mist (ideally)and mixes with air before entering the combustion chamber.The spark plug then fires and ignite the air/fuel mixture within the combustion chamber (above piston within the engine block) to produce force. Clogged injectors result in fuel injected in non-mist form or less fuel thus causing irregular combustion.


    Pulse Generator Assembly
    PGM-FI lights to remain on even when riding. Cost of pulse generator assembly and starter gasket is $140 including $60 for labour(Dated 2011).
    Problem solved after changing the pulse generator assembly.

    Esp. for Revo riders, when the PGM-FI or orange light flickers or does not turn off, there are many different problems which may have caused it.
    Damages can be very serious and costly even if its a new or old bike.
    Best is rectify the problem ASAP.


    Overflow Rubber Tubes
    The three rubber pipes are for:
    1) Water drain hole at fuel cap area. The fuel cap itself ( about 1.5 inch diameter with rubber gasket) seals the tank itself so water cannot get in to foul up the fuel. However, there are gaps around the fuel cap assembly and key hole which allows rain water to seep through. If you open your fuel cap you will note that there is a hole for the water to drain off. One of the tubes connects to this.
    2) Coolant reservoir overflow. This is self-explanatory.
    3) Fuel breather pipe. This is connected to a valve under the fuel tank and it's purpose is to balance the air pressure in the fuel tank as petrol is sucked out by the fuel pump. (I removed it as doesn't serve me any purpose because even without the tube, the fuel breather is still there to balance the air pressure)
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 08-11-2013 at 12:10 PM.

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    Default Features & Parts (II)

    Chain & Sprocket
    Stock chain setup for CB400 is 525 chain/sprocket.
    Sprocket sizing F15 R43 ( For Vtec ).
    F15 R44 ( For Revo ).

    Guidelines:
    Bigger rear or smaller front sproc for pick up.
    Smaller rear or bigger front for top end/expressway cruising.

    Changing rear sproc is better because front sproc affects the ratio a lot.

    Smaller front sproc or bigger rear sprocket results in better acceleration but lousy top end.
    ( Good for urban/city riding )

    Bigger front sproc or smaller rear sproc results in better top end but slower acceleration.
    ( Good for touring or long journey trips, good for daily expressway users )
    ( This setup saves fuel as engine will not be that stress compared to urban setup when travelling on expressway)

    Regarding different brands of sprocket & chain, usually aftermarket chains are around the same or even better quality, personal preference of which brand of chains to choose from.

    For most aftermarket sproc are made from aluminum, its lighter in weight but wears out faster than original sproc if not well taken care of.
    Personal preference of which brands to choose from.

    Do your research in finding your favourite chain + sproc setup.
    Remember to take care of the chain/sproc for Longevity. 520 conversion available.
    Pro: Lighter, Faster pickup.
    Con: Wears out faster than 525.


    520 chain conversion on the REVO:
    There was a speedo diff of 9% against Rear Wheel SPD, this 520 translated only a diff of 3% deficiency.
    ~~~~Taken from RaceWerk thread~~~~

    520 conversion provides massive weight savings.
    It’s proven that lower unsprung weight results in better (effective) transfer of power to the rear wheel.
    This means better throttle response (squeeze throttle a bit and the bike moves in response).

    Raceworks have also documented their Dyno results for the 520 conversion on the Revo showing the better throttle response.
    They have also found that speedometer error was reduced from the stock set-up at 10% error to only 3% with the 520 set-up.

    To get an idea of the weight savings, just pick up a box of DID 520 chain and compare/weight it to the 525 chain.
    What difference you feel is only from the chain.
    Add sprockets weight savings and you’ll get the idea.
    For this set-up, maintain the same gear ratio (front 15/rear 44) as before so can feel the difference after the conversion unless you want to play around the sprocket sizing to suit your preference.

    How to reduce unsprung weight?
    - Reduce chain and sprocket weights
    - Reduce wheel weight
    - Reduce tyre weight
    - Reduce brake disc weight

    Do remember that weight reduction must be done within limits so that the component is still strong enough to handle the power exerted on component.


    Exhaust System:
    Exhaust slider, cheap ones are prone to melt, I am using the APA exhaust slider which cost $60++ and never melt before.

    Aftermarket Exhaust systems are definitely a lot lighter than the bulky and heavy stock exhaust.
    Louder & bassier than stock exhaust tone, varies among diff aftermarket exhaust.

    We have riders using LV slip-on, GPR slip-on, Yoshi R77 Slip-on, Yoshi Full system etc.
    Some exotic exhausts are Moriwaki & SP Tadao (Single or dual muffler available).

    Do not remove the catalytic converters as it will mess up the A/F ratio of the bike unless you are planning to fix a Power Commander to tune the bike up.

    There isn't any sensor on the exhaust system but the engine is designed and tuned from the factory to have a certain amount of exhaust back-pressure.
    Removing all the cat will affect the exhaust back-pressure.

    In a normal engine, this often results in a loss of back pressure which may negatively affect low-end torque.

    Loss of torque at low engine speeds on stock engines which are not re-tuned for the flow capability of the new exhaust system/modification.

    The only prove I had was two dyno charts from Racewerks which was dated in 2008 where removing one of the cat decreases the A/F ratio which made the bike running slightly lean.


    Power Commander(PC) / Tuning:
    PC5= Power Commander 5.
    It's just a piggy back unit.

    Used for EFI bikes to tune its A/F ratio, something like carb bikes need to re-jet for maximum performance.
    Stock ECU cannot be tuned, need a PC to overwrite the stock ECU.
    PC dun alter your stock ECU, it just over write the stock ECU mapping.

    Power commander don't help u to adjust the idling, it fine-tunes the air/fuel ratio of the bike.
    it is normal for Revo idling speed to be 1400rpm.
    Dun ever attempt to adjust the idling or else it will go haywire.

    Slip-on exhaust & aftermarket air filter if bike runs too lean, a PC is needed.
    If using full system exhaust, confirm need PC or else bike run lean then slightly low power performance.
    PCV is for EFI bikes no matter it's 125cc or 1300cc, the bike needed to go for a dyno-run which produce a mapping for the PC

    Just to add on, if u changed to aftermarket air filter and exhaust or all the cat removed, best to get PC to tune your Revo or else it will be running too lean.
    If aftermarket air filter & stock exhaust still ok.

    Diff models of PCV is available for diff bikes or else improper fitting might not work after installation.

    With proper A/F ratio, you can maximize the performance of the bike and feel the power of a full system.


    ABS
    As our bike is with ABS , any tampering with the brake related stuff might cause the ABS to malfunction.
    Changing the stock rubber brake hose of ABS models into steel braided hose requires the recalibration of the ABS which is very costly.


    Incorrect fuel reading
    It might be the floating pin in the fuel tank that is faulty.


    Down fork
    Drop fork not more than 15mm. Or else your geometry will cause your bike handling to be unpredictable and stress your frame unnecessarily.


    Fork leaking
    - How to know whether your fork need to service fork?
    By Stationary applying front brake and jerk down your fork if its is easily able to jerk down then is
    time for you to service your fork.
    If fork seal damaged or fork oil leaking, please service the fork.


    Servicing Fork Oil & Seal
    When draining out the old fork oil, can notice that it is very dirty after much usage. Fork components washed & cleaned, fresh Maxima fork 15wt oil been added, one 1L bottle, 500ml each on each fork. Thereafter the fork compression is being adjusted to my likings. Now when I do heavy braking, no more harsh diving towards the front. Much more stable ride.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:33 AM.

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    Default Maintenance-Free Battery

    Maintenance-Free Battery
    Don't forget to check the specs of the battery. The Cold Cranking Ampere (CCA) is important.
    It determines whether it will be strong enough to crank your bike up to start.
    Cold cranking amperes (CCA) is the amount of current a battery can provide at 0 °F (-18 °C).
    The rating is defined as the current a lead-acid battery at that temperature can deliver for 30 seconds and maintain at least 1.2 volts per cell (7.2 volts for a 12-volt battery).
    It is a more demanding test than those at higher temperatures.

    Yuasa YTZ10S is the OEM size for Revo. Double swipe of the Speedometer/Odometer signify a weak battery.

    Charge the battery to ensure durability and change to a new battery if necessary.
    If charged old & new battery still swing 2 times might be the following reason;
    1) Rectifier loose connection or spoiled.
    2) Battery discharged by the wire of electrical accessories (alarm, LED light, Voltmeter & etc) contacted to bike body frame. Also known as weak battery.
    Usually is the accessories wire across under the seat.
    3) Coil malfunctioning

    Yuasa YTZ14S can be used but remember to remove the rubber support on the base of the battery compartment.
    Difference between 12s and 14s is a little larger capacity by 0.2Ah and larger CCA.

    I changed my coil, rectifier and battery due to faulty coil which is overcharging my battery (spoilt 2 of them).
    Original Yuasa YTZ10S for Revo, Yuasa YTX9BS for other spec of CB400. Our battery need to be charged every few months to prolong its usage as our coil can never fully charge back the battery when riding thus battery gradually weaken after months of usage. I just changed to Ballistic battery which is lithium battery $240 at Unique Motors. Once a while still have the double swipe but after a few rides its normal again. Change to lithium battery or higher capacity battery instead.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:31 AM.

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    Default Q&A related to the bike (I)

    Oiling/Lubing the chain
    Lube the chain personally so that can monitor the chain and tires condition at the same time.
    Ensure that the chain is not too loose and has enough chain slack for smooth ride.
    Please tighten the chain if necessary.


    Bleeding the brake hose/fluid
    Bleeding the hose is done to eliminate air bubbles in the brake fluid along the hose or changing the brake fluid when it is due.
    It's quite rare for air bubbles to get into the hose other than when changing fluid unless it is not done properly. One possibility is when the bike falls on it's side.

    If there is air bubble in the hose, the bubble will be compressed when you squeeze or press down on the brake lever. When this happens, the pistons in the brake calliper won't move as much as it should.

    When applying the brakes and it feels "spongy" or soft, time to bleed the brake fluid.

    Brake fluid absorb moisture from the surrounding air and after prolong usage, please bleed your brakes to ensure braking efficiency is not compromised. After bleeding, brakes will be responsive rather than spongy feel.

    Can consider changing to Steel Braided Brake Hose when due for bleeding brake fluid for those bikes with stock rubber hose.


    Brake Calliper
    When to service them?
    When you changing your brake pads, the calliper piston is very rough when pushing back, tats the time to service the brake callipers where the mechanic will dismantle the calliper and pistons and washed them and replace the O-rings. Usually I change the brake pads myself and I will spray contact cleaner to remove those brake dust and dirt to keep the callipers clean.


    Clutch in when starting bike??
    The main purpose is to prevent you from starting the bike with the gear engaged as some bikes dun have the side stand cut off switch or the switch removed; The whole bike will surge forwards when starting in engaged gear.


    Power-Cut
    The Revo red-lines at 13,000rpm. I personally would not want to rev my bike beyond the red-line because doing so on a regular basis would over-stress the engine beyond the levels that Honda intended it to perform at.

    If you want more power/speed than what the Revo can provide, get a more powerful bike instead of modifying your bikes so they can "go faster" and end up spending money subsequently in repairing the bikes. Worse case scenarios are those who stretch their bikes beyond their limits eventually lost their lives.


    Radiator Mesh
    PM our fellow rider Godsend whom you can get the customized radiator mesh from. A lot of designs and samples to choose from catering a wide range of bikes & models.
    View Godsendworx Custom Radiator Guard below @ Post #31


    Suspension
    First you have to ensure that your tyres air pressure is right.
    The only time u know when its soft is that when you go thru a hump or take a reasonable hard bend and at the midst of the turn, you feel the back wheel wobbly.

    Assuming yours a SHOWA shock (apply to most) You can use a "C" shape like hook grip spanner (originally provided) to turn down to compress the spring one notch down to harden the suspension.
    There are five settings and do this for both side. If you have reach the maximum, need to have your canister recharge.
    Rear Suspension can be adjusted to harden it, when it cannot be adjusted, it must be serviced and rebuilded, need to remember to add a spacer to compensate for the softened shock spring.

    If you want to fully rebuild with additional improvement for rebound rate, can always go to Teck Thye at 12 Braddell Road and look for David.

    If your front suspension (fork)is soft, have your oil drained, cleanse and refilled with fork oil (usually 5W to 10W) in case its level has dropped and viscosity increase due to worn out metal filings inside (makes it thick and creamy). Normally most mototiam only top up 400cc out of the content of 500cc per bottle.
    Do use at least 450cc. If you want to increase the rebound rate, have a front wheel axle bearing (the same size as the front wheel axle (bearings) place on top of the inner spring before capping up.


    Crashbar/Frame slider
    Most bike shops sell crashbars for S4. Can recommend Unique motorsports at Kaki Bukit Autobay, MotoWorld at Kaki Bukit etc.
    Motivation frame slider and Equipment extreme frame slider are available instead of crashbars as well.
    Seng Kwang provides customized 2/3 points Stainless Steel crashbars which is mounted to the frame.


    Accessories
    Installing some electrical accessories might affect the wiring circuit, LED strips, air horn etc.

    Accessories pricing can be found in CMO & advertisers thread, so check it out to get the latest prices.
    Pricing wise is not accurate as currency inflation, things getting more pricey.

    ~~~~~"Homework" has to be done~~~~~
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 31-05-2013 at 12:23 AM.

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    Default Q&A related to the bike (II)

    Why choose Revo & is it a good choice? Compared with Carb Models CB400?
    I got myself a 1st batch Revo when it was first available in the consumer market.
    It has the grey engine and gearbox.
    Now I got the black engine and gearbox version of Revo.

    I can say is I rode Spec 1-3 before, as compared to Revo, Revo is better response and much more stable and better handling,
    a much more smoother ride but a bit hotter as it's EFI, but not as hot as GSXR, GSXR is always cooking my balls.

    Those who interested in getting REVO, can go the respective bike shops & ask for OTR prices, insurances & quotation.
    Cos everyone of us get the bike at different prices due to COE & bought it at different timing, no point keep asking in the thread for the price.

    I don't understand why people will go and buy those jacked-up prices S4 of previous spec, etc spec 2 and 3......
    Paying so much might as well spend a bit more for Revo, new technology, EFI, better material and quality, also must take into considerations like engine wear/tear, COE expiring date etc for used bikes.
    Consider the fact it is newer, more responsive and smoother ride.
    Take into fact you buying a carb S4 which is been abused for how many years, worst still without proper care.
    The money u need to set aside for wear & tears etc...........

    My friend refused to heed my advice, complaining he has a tight budget, bought a spec3(4yrs bike) + (wear & tear within a year) is equivalent to a new Revo considering the deprecation & jacked-up price of carb S4.

    Spec 3 what I feel tat it has been marked up due to the price increase of Revo, better parts/quality, higher workmanship/production prices of Revo.

    Do your calculations and see which one is worth it to buy, its personal preference.


    Stock rubber brake hose or Steel Braided brake hose?
    The stock brake lines are just rubber hoses and they soften over time.

    When braking pressure is applied, the hoses expand and soak up the braking force to the brake callipers thereby reducing the braking effectiveness.

    Changing to steel braided hoses prevents the loss of braking pressure due to expansion simply because steel braided hoses do not expand under pressure so all the pressure is directed towards the brake calliper pistons.

    Changing the stock rubber brake hose of ABS models into steel braided hose requires the recalibration of the ABS which is very costly.


    Difference between Revtev & Power Abuser
    Revtec:
    Benefits
    - Increase Torque/Power
    - Increase Throttle Responsivesness
    - Improve Battery Charging System
    - Improve Fuel Efficiency
    - Smoother Gear Change
    - Minimize Engine Vibration

    Power Abuser :
    Benefits
    1. Improved Lighting Visibility
    2. Electronic Lifespan Extended
    3. Better Fuel Economy
    4. Reduce engine braking
    5. Improve Torque, Power & Response
    6. Stabilized Idle & Improved Engine Kick Over
    7. Improved Engine Response


    Magnet for oil filter?
    If you have a industrial magnet, those really strong ones using mainly on computer hard disk types.

    Place that little piece of magnet on the oil filter itself, this will enable the metallic particles to be stuck to the ends of the filter when the gear grind or anything that the engine has rubbed off.
    Very useful tip but the magnet is actually hard to remove when stuck but it is a cheap alternative.
    Not tat recommended to use these kind of magnet as what if u not careful when handling and it attracts to the engine or other parts of the bike which result in difficulties in removing.
    Require a pair of pilers for removal.
    K&N oil filter also have this function.

    I have the Oil filter magnet which serve the same purpose, just tat mine is 6 small magnets which forms a ring around the filter.
    I shipped in tat time, just want to try out the product.
    It will also attract small road debris/particles/metal (iron/copper).


    Fuel Additives?
    It cleans out unwanted deposits and protects internal parts.

    I use STP gas treatment, octane booster and fuel system cleaner once a month respectively.
    Never really notice about the FC but throttle response is a lot smoother.
    For me is I pour 1/3 bottle then i can use 3 times.


    Oil Additives
    Use of additives is another approach to improving and maintaining oil performance. High engine temperatures combine with moisture, combustion byproducts (including unburned gasoline), rust, corrosion, engine wear particles and oxygen to produce sludge and varnish. The additives not only assist oil in maintaining good lubrication, they also help minimize sludge and varnish, and any damage from their formation. Here are the categories of key additive ingredients and why they're important:

    • Viscosity-index improvers: Reduce the oil's tendency to thin with increasing temperature.
    • Detergents: Unlike the household type, they don't scrub engine surfaces. They do remove some deposits, primarily solids. But their main purpose is to keep the surfaces clean by inhibiting the formation of high-temperature deposits, rust and corrosion.
    • Dispersants: Disperse solid particles, keeping them in solution, so they don't come together to form sludge, varnish and acids. Some additives work both as detergents and dispersants.
    • Antiwear agents: There are times when the lubricating film breaks down, so the antiwear agents have to protect the metal surfaces. A zinc and phosphorus compound called ZDDP is a long-used favorite, along with other phosphorus (and sulphur) compounds. If you musts know, ZDDP stand for zinc diakyl dithiophosphate.
    • Friction modifiers: These aren't the same as antiwear agents. They reduce engine friction and, so, can improve fuel economy. Graphite, molybdenum and other compounds are used.
    • Pour-point depressants: Just because the 0° F viscosity rating is low doesn't mean the oil will flow readily at low temperatures. Oil contains wax particles that can congeal and reduce flow, so these additives are used to prevent it.
    • Antioxidants: With engine temperatures being pushed up for better emissions control, the antioxidants are needed to prevent oxidation (and, therefore, thickening) of oil. Some of the additives that perform other functions also serve this purpose, such as the antiwear agents.
    • Foam inhibitors: The crankshaft whipping through the oil in the pan causes foaming. Oil foam is not as effective a lubricant as a full-liquid stream, so the inhibitors are used to cause the foam bubbles to collapse.
    • Rust/corrosion inhibitors: Protect metal parts from acids and moisture.


    Fuel
    Please keep min 1/3 tank petrol to cool the tank & to avoid fuel pump overheated (Not to enter reserve often).
    Singapore RON92/95/98/Premium petrol can be used for Revo.

    Not everyone can afford to pay a lump sum for bike damages, we can prevent it from happening by maintaining our bike well.
    So much petrol stations around in SG and within reach of Msia petrol, it's just a matter of when and where the rider want to re-fuel.

    About re-fueling when touring, many factors need to be considered; touring speed, distance before the need for re-fueling for any specify bike which requires more re-fueling intervals. Such requests can be made for a well organized group.

    Overseas; AUS/Europe etc, their climate is totally different from our tropical climate. Humidity & altitude & air pressure are also factors to be considered.
    Our Atmosphere is much more humid & more moisture when compared to their cool/dry environment.


    How much air to pump into tires?
    High pressure: + Speed/mileage but - grip.
    Low pressure: - Speed/mileage but + grip.

    Low pressure good for raining days as more grip/contact patch is available.

    Tire pressure varies among different weight if riders and with or without pillions/cargo.


    Wheel bearing
    When to change? What will happen?
    For wheel bearing, if your wheel bearing is damaged, you will hear sound coming from it when you pass through humps. The sound like suspension damage like that but is not suspension damage. It will be wheel bearing damage.
    The best way to check is to lift up the bike and shake the wheel if the wheel is able to move left and right.


    HISS light problem
    When turning the key to ON, needle swipe pass the meters, the HISS light just couldn't go off, then cannot start.
    One solution to bypass it is to press start when the needle is swiping pass the meters.

    Another solution is Open throttle a bit when u start the bike.
    Usually just can start the bike without opening throttle.


    Valve Clearance
    valve clearance inspection simply means to check the clearance level of the valves. All 4-stroke combustion engines have valves which are opened and closed usually by rocker arms. These valves are located near the top of the engine block. Honda CB400 Revo has 4 valves per cylinder, thus a total of 16 valves.

    These valves are opened and shut by the overhead camshafts. Engine manufacturers also use shims (metal plates) to regulate how much the valves need to move in order to open and shut the

    Over time, wear and tear occurs where the camshaft lobe push the valve stem. Badly maintained engines may also result in the valves themselves needing to be cleaned of carbon deposits and/or replaced due to wear & tear & usage.

    Thus, a "Valve Clearance Maintenance" job requires removing the top of the engine block to access the camshafts and valves. The clearance (or distance) between the top of the valve stem and camshaft lobe must be within a certain tolerance. For Revo, the valve clearance when cold should be:
    Intake - 0.20mm
    Exhaust - 0.27mm

    This is a major service and should be done by a reputable mechanic whom you trust.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:47 AM.

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    Default Q&A related to the bike (III)

    Motorcycle Oil or Car Oil???
    Nowadays, engine technology and oil technology have advanced requiring less frequent oil changes under normal driving conditions.

    Motorcycle engine oil is required to lubricate the engine, transmission, and the clutch (with the exception of bikes with dry clutches).
    Motorcycles require very little and/or no friction modifiers to help improve clutch friction and to prevent clutch slippage.
    But to make up for this lack of friction modifiers, motorcycle oils use higher levels of anti-wear additives such as ZDDP, also known as phosphorous, to limit engine friction and wear.
    Motorcycle oil has extra anti-wear additives and is lubricating so much more than automotive oil.

    "Car-derived" motor oils are designed just for engines
    The relevant oil companies then develop and test automotive oils for motorcycle use.

    A properly specified motorcycle oil will still allow for the appropriate lubrication and cooling of a motorcycle clutch, whilst maintaining 100% of the drive to be transmitted by the clutch, even under arduous operating conditions.

    The Japanese Automotive Standards Organization (JASO) has created their own set of performance and quality standards for petrol engines of Japanese origin.

    For four-stroke gasoline engines, the JASO T904 standard is used, and is particularly relevant to motorcycle engines.
    The JASO T904-MA and MA2 standards are designed to distinguish oils that are approved for wet clutch use, and the JASO T904-MB standard is not suitable for wet clutch use.

    For two-stroke gasoline engines, the JASO M345 (FA, FB, FC) standard is used, and this refers particularly to low ash, lubricate, detergency, low smoke and exhaust blocking.
    These standards, especially JASO-MA and JASO-FC, are designed to address oil-requirement issues not addressed by the API service categories.

    One element of the JASO-MA standard is a friction test designed to determine suitability for wet clutch usage.
    An oil that meets JASO-MA is considered appropriate for wet clutch operations. Oils marketed as motorcycle-specific will carry the JASO-MA label.

    JASO MA and JASO MA2 standard ensure that engine oil is free of friction modifiers and is fit to be used in motorcycle engines.
    If there is no mention of JASO MA specification on the bottle of engine oil then do not buy it, irrespective how many praises you might hear from its seller.


    ehow website regarding car/motorcycle engine oil here
    http://www.ehow.com/facts_5954408_ca...cycle-oil.html

    Function
    Unlike cars, most motorcycles use the same oil supply for the transmission as they do the engine.

    Considerations
    The constant meshing of gears in a motorcycle's transmission tends to break oil down faster than normal operation in a car engine, which is why motorcycles require a specially formulated oil.

    Effects
    When exposed to extreme heat and pressure, the oil's molecular structure begins to break down into its component parts, thinning the oil and reducing its ability to lubricate. This is true of both auto and motorcycle oils.

    Additives
    Oil companies introduce a number of additives to motorcycle oils that car oils do not have, including PTFE, also known as Teflon, which coats the gears to reduce friction. This reduced friction and subsequent heat reduction helps to reduce oil breakdown.

    Oil Friction
    Aside from their increased friction reduction, motorcycle oils have a clear advantage when used in bikes with wet (oil submerged) clutches. The friction modifiers in motorcycle oil help to prevent clutch slippage, which automotive oils actually encourage.


    ehow website regarding the difference between car/motorcycle engine oil here
    http://www.ehow.com/facts_5820051_di...l-car-oil.html

    Cost Considerations
    Motorcycle-specific oil costs are on average 120 percent of what they are for car oils. If you buy from a motorcycle dealer, the costs can be up to 300 percent or higher.

    Viscosity Retention
    The manufacturers of motorcycle oils claim polymer additives they use make their products more shear-stable, but no studies to date actually support this claim, and one study by Professor John Woolum of California State University actually finds against the claim.

    Wet Clutches and Additives
    Car oils may contain additives such as molybdenum disulphide or buffering agents such as boron or calcium that can interfere with your motorcycle engine's smooth operation and cause clutch slippage.

    Environmental Considerations
    The requirement for a special motorcycle lubricant is influenced by the average temperature range in the place where you drive. If you tend to drive in either extremely hot or extremely cold weather, car oils may not provide the viscosity grade your motorcycle engine needs.

    Frequency of Oil Change
    Manufacturers recommend that because of the higher heat and faster breakdown of lubricant viscosity, oil should be changed more frequently in motorcycles than in cars. Lubricants designed specifically for motorcycles tend to last slightly longer before breaking down than comparable car oils.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Motorcycle has lesser friction modifier due to the fact that it is operated by wet-clutch while automatic transmission car uses a separated transmission gearbox.

    Motorcycle and car oils are very similar but there are couple of areas that are key to motorcycle operation.
    The first area concerns common sumps, or the use of motor oil, to lubricate and cool the transmission.
    As you know, in a passenger car the transmission is lubricated by an Automatic Transmission fluid, which has frictional properties required for transmission operation.

    In a motorcycle, where the transmission may be lubricated by the engine oil, an engine oil that does not have the same level of friction modification (for fuel economy) of a typical passenger car engine oil will provide better transmission performance in terms of transmission lock-up and slippage.
    So motorcycle engine oil does not contain much of the friction modifiers of a passenger car engine oil.
    The second area of concern for motorcycle engine oils is that they tend to shear (breakdown viscosity) more quickly than a typical passenger car.
    Motorcycle oils are designed to provide exceptional protection against viscosity loss.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    More info here here
    http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/..._Oil_FAQs.aspx

    http://vfrworld.com/tex_vfr/tech/oil.htm

    http://www.ehow.com/about_6304911_ig...very-hot_.html

    http://www.ehow.com/way_5375199_moto...intervals.html

    http://www.ehow.com/facts_4928418_wh...-interval.html

    http://www.ehow.com/info_8419882_fac...intervals.html

    http://www.ehow.com/about_6133138_ig...burn-out_.html


    Discussion about Engine Oil Change Interval by @SparkerS1

    With the release of the recent JASO motorcycle standard (MA 2006), an opportunity was presented to again upgrade the Mobil 1 Racing 4T formulation such that it continues to meet and/or exceed the latest industry and OEM standards for motorcycles.


    So how is synthetic motor oil for passenger cars different from motorcycles?

    First, let's be clear about the overall benefits of synthetic motor oil compared to those of conventional motor oils, whether for passenger cars or motorcycles:

    Superior long-term engine protection.
    Superior high-temperature stability.
    Excellent low-temperature starting.
    Outstanding engine performance.
    Low volatility/low oil consumption.

    It's a little hard to generalize about the difference between passenger-car motor oils and motorcycle oils. That's because not all viscosities of passenger-car oils have the same levels of zinc and phosphorus, and there are even greater differences among the motorcycle oils. In general, motorcycle oils have:

    Additive packages balanced differently for motorcycle engine and transmission operation. For passenger vehicles, fuel economy and emission system protection are higher priorities. These require low phosphorus systems and the use of friction modifiers. Motorcycle oils do not require friction modifiers for fuel economy and for better clutch friction less/no friction modifier is optimum. Motorcycle oils allow the use of higher levels of antiwear additives such as ZDDP (phosphorous).
    (Updated December 2007)



    What are the overall advantages of motorcycle oils?

    In addition to the overall benefits listed above – specifically, high-temperature stability and low volatility/low oil consumption – synthetic motorcycle oils also offer superior anti-corrosion performance compared to conventional motor oil, which is important in many parts of the country where bikes may sit in garages for several months of the year.

    Compared to conventional oils, motorcycle oils provide superior wear and high-temperature protection, and promote engine cleanliness and lower oil consumption.

    Once you get past these general advantages, you have to deal with each specific motorcycle oil one at a time to understand the benefits.


    Okay. Let's start with Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40. What does it offer that Mobil 1 for cars does not?

    Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 is designed for sport bikes. Most of these bikes have multi-cylinder/multi-valve engines and use a common sump, which means the engine oil lubricates the engine, transmission and wet clutch. So unlike Mobil 1 for cars, Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 motor oil has no friction modifiers, which could lead to clutch slippage.

    The motorcycle oil also has more phosphorus/zinc for enhanced wear protection at high engine speeds and high loads.

    In addition, Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 has a high performance dispersant/detergent technology for better high-temperature performance and engine cleanliness. Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 is also offered in a different viscosity grade than Mobil 1 for passenger cars. (Updated December 2007)

    The owner's manual says I should change the oil every 5,000 miles or once a year. I change my oil every 2,500 miles or twice a year. So why do I need that kind of protection?

    For peace of mind and added protection. You pay a lot for a bike these days, so why risk running your engine in ordinary oil? Just like Mobil 1 synthetic oil for cars, Mobil 1 synthetic motorcycle oil helps keep your engine clean – free from varnish and deposits – and smooth running mile after mile, no matter what conditions you ride in.

    Mobil 1 oil benefits engine life and performance. In fact, the lubrication capability of Mobil 1 motorcycle oil helps maintain peak horsepower and acceleration throughout the life of your engine. And with Mobil 1 motorcycle oils you can go the full 5,000 miles between oil changes.

    So, if you want to ride your bike long and hard and not be concerned about the oil, choose Mobil 1 motorcycle oil.

    Taken from http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...AQs.aspx#FAQs1

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Years ago, it was possible to put the same oil in bikes and cars. Since then, car and bike engines have followed different design objectives. This means that nowadays, some 600cc Japanese road bikes produce twice the bhp per litre of a sports car by using engines with running speeds approaching 15,000 rpm.

    A sporty 105bhp 1.4-litre car with a 3.2-litre sump has an engine oil stress factor of approximately 23. A sporty 0.6-litre 123bhp bike with a 2.7-litre sump, on the other hand, has an engine oil stress factor of around 76 – nearly three times that of the car.

    Most 4-stroke bike engines contain less oil than car engines, and that oil not only has to perform in the engine, but also has to survive the high stresses of the gearbox and allow smooth clutch operation. Bike oils have to work much harder in comparison with car oil.

    With less sophisticated oils, intense shear forces can lead to the breakdown of viscosity modifiers that prevent oils from becoming too thin as the temperature increases. When this breakdown occurs, small carbon particles are released into the oil and can form sludge deposits. These can lead to carbon and lacquer deposits especially on hot engine parts such as pistons and piston ring grooves, resulting in starting problems, power loss and failure to protect pistons from metal loss.

    In the harsh environment of a modern bike engine, oil degrades with time, which results in a loss of the properties it was formulated to have. This degradation leads to a build-up of acids and an increase in the oil’s viscosity, which results in a reduction in your engine’s performance and the level of protection that the oil gives to engine components.

    Your engine oil needs to be changed regularly to ensure engine longevity.
    Oil changes are at owner's discretion.

    Taken from: http://www.shell.com.hk/en/products-...rotection.html

    Click here to view the oil change interval & feedbacks of other CB400 riders.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 08:57 AM.

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    Default Q&A related to the bike (IV)

    @Ong_Lai
    Fuel injected, hence the high idling, it may also mean higher compression of the engine hence the high idling, I might be wrong.
    IMO lowering the idling might stall the engine but it does no damage to the engine, though I might sound different.

    As for the fuel consumption for 1000rpm and 1400rpm its not much of a difference, put in in km, maybe only difference in 1 to 2 km for a full tank of fuel mileage..

    Normally a Revo is able to attain 300 to 320km from full tank till it touch reserve (about 14 litre of fuel, not including reserve fuel) base on 90% normal riding and 10% drag a bit

    My conclusion is as below
    Riding style, 100% never open vtec, 300 to 320
    Riding style, 70% normal, 30% open vtec, 280 to 300
    Riding style, 50% normal 50% open vtec 260 to 280
    Riding style, 20% normal 80% open vtec 250 to 260
    (My meaning of open Vtec is really drag till at least 11k and above)

    This is based on few months of observation
    My bike is almost stock, only change of exhaust to GPR Slip on (Stock Header)
    Btw I am using 95 all along.



    @Winners
    It's really not much use to prevent the 2nd sweeping problem with the retrofit headlight switch.
    I had already made 1 on my bike since day 1 and it can be selected in "OFF" mode, "halogen bulb" mode and an "LED daytime running light" mode, which I had built into the headlamp. So, when I ride during the day (which is most of the time), I'll just use the LED light in my headlamp.

    Unfortunately, the 2nd sweeping problem will recur again. Initially, it was about once a week, then once every few days and now, every morning, even with the headlight switch set to "OFF" mode. If I charge the battery manually, the problem will recycle again.
    That is: once a week or 2, once every few days and every morning again after about 2 to 3 weeks. So, it's a waste of time.

    Anyway, I am of the opinion that the fuel pump will draw a high current when the key switch is first set to "ignition" (that is before starting the engine).
    Although the fuel pump will stop after a second or 2, however, this action could have caused the battery to lose its power momentarily and if we were to start the engine immediately after the orange "Fuel Injection" light is off (which most riders will usually do), it may be too short time for the battery's voltage to recover.
    Further to that, the voltage drop caused by the heavy current consumed by the starter motor will then cause this 2nd sweeping of the meters because its circuit would have detected excessive overall voltage drop. The chances of this occurrence will be much lesser if the battery is pretty brand new at less than 6 months old.

    My conclusion is that the battery's capacity is insufficient for this bike (which is equipped with Fuel Injection).
    The older carburettor model (Spec 3 and older) will experience less of this problem because there's no fuel pump to drain the battery when the key switch is set to "ignition". I am well aware that most Japanese vehicles (cars and motorcycles alike) are designed with just the minimum battery capacity needed. This whole issue is because they want to save costs as a larger capacity battery will need a larger alternator (to charge the larger capacity battery), which in turn will increase the overall manufacturing costs.

    Therefore, I believe it's no use to see Boon Siew after all. The only way to prevent the 2nd sweeping problem is to modify the battery compartment to accommodate a larger capacity battery. But this is not really necessary as the bike will still perform as per normal with its existing battery (already proven by forumer LeoWai in his post), albeit with the annoying 2nd sweeping of the needles. Looks like we'll just have to live with it then.

    Take note that it is not a good practice to keep the key switch at ON position for too long without starting the engine.
    This is because the ignition coils (the 1 giving the high voltage to the spark plugs and there are 2of these, 1 on each side below the fuel tank) will be "charged" and heated up if the engine is not started soon.
    However, I think if it's less than 1 minute, it should be okay, but never leave the key in the ON position without starting the engine for more than 2 minutes.
    Otherwise, the ignition coil may overheat.

    Furthermore, for those without the manual headlight switch (self-retrofit) to manually switch OFF the headlight, the battery will be further drained by the 55watt halogen bulb if the engine is not started soon.

    My conclusion is that there are only 2 ways to resolve the 2nd sweeping problem:

    a. Change to a larger capacity battery.

    b. The firmware for the detection circuit has to be changed/upgraded, which I doubt the manufacturer is willing to do.
    So, we'll just have to live with it then, since it won't really affect the operation of the bike anyway.


    In my conclusion, a well designed bike would not need to manually charge its battery every week or so.

    This is ridiculous and it just doesn't makes sense. It is only necessary if the bike is left unused for more than a month.
    Apart from the HISS and IU unit, which are only consuming in milli-amperes, there is no other electrical consumption when the key switch is in OFF position.
    I'm referring to a stock bike without an alarm unit.

    Under normal circumstances, the battery should be adequately charged if it is ridden (not idling) for about 1 hour per day.

    My comparison here has all the while been the original HONDA battery. I have never changed my batteries before, even for my ex-SPEC 3, which lasted me more than 2.5 years and my present REVO is only coming to 1 year.

    A larger capacity battery will definitely help to eliminate this problem because it will have more than sufficient stored energy to prevent the large voltage drop during starting. Of course if you are going to store the bike for more than 2 months without starting, there is a likelihood of the problem recurring again. This is of course an exceptional case and generally, most riders would have used their bikes at least once a week, if not more.

    In comparing the ratio of the weight of a slightly larger battery to the weight of the bike, it won't create any noticeable increase in fuel consumption. Under-inflated tires will be a more prominent cause, although this is a different subject altogether.

    The present original HONDA battery, which is less than 1 year old, is not even able to prevent the 2nd sweep problem despite the bike is being used every day. Some forumers even commented that even during mid-day starting (that means the bike was just ridden a few hours before), the problem will recur. I also had personally experienced this myself.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 28-05-2013 at 06:13 AM.

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    Default Q&A related to the bike (V)

    Can I spray water on my headers/engine to cool it off after a super hot day of riding?
    Don't do that. The metal parts on the bike will weaken and will lose their strength if prolonged drenched with water after a hot ride. If raining days then it cannot be helped.
    If its for cooling down, just turn off the engine and let the air cool it down. If you're going to wash the bike, let it cool down first.


    Regarding bike warm up for Revo, if never wait for that warm-up/anti choke to finish and just ride as normal after starting, does it has any affect?
    If it's the first start up of the day, I will prefer to let it warmed up properly before moving off as I can use the waiting time to check the bike, during the rest of the day depending how long I park the bike.
    I can just ride off slowly without waiting for the warm up to finish. But if start and ride off slowly it's also alright.
    Do not whack the bike or wide open throttle will do.
    Eventually you make the call.


    Oil Filter Information [For Sharing with all REVO riders]
    1. If you purchase performance filters (why not use stock OEM Honda oil filters? Because there are better filters out there which can either give higher filtration or higher flow rates), then do be informed that both KN-303 and KN-204 from K&N Filters, can be used for the Honda Revo.

    2. The difference between KN-303 and KN-204, is in its length, which varies only by 10mm. Width, thread size etc (all features) are the same. This 10mm length is negligible in both performance and mileage. The reason for difference in length is to facilitate installation in tight spaces, for example if you have changed to an aftermarket full system, the pipes may be closer to the oil filter due to variations in the headers/pipes design.


    3. This is the specs for the 2 filter models:

    Part KN-303 Product Specifications

    Anti Drain Back Valve: Yes

    Bypass Valve: Yes

    Filter Material: High Flow Premium Media

    Gasket Material: Nitrile Rubber

    Height: 3.344 in (85 mm)

    Outside Diameter: 2.688 in (68 mm)

    PSI Relief Valve: Yes

    Removal Nut: Yes

    Style: Canister

    Thread Specification: M20 x 1.5


    Part KN-204 Product Specifications

    Product Style: Oil Filters

    Anti Drain Back Valve: Yes

    Bypass Valve: Yes

    Filter Material: High Flow Premium Media

    Gasket Material: Nitrile Rubber

    Height: 2.969 in (75 mm)

    Outside Diameter: 2.656 in (67 mm)

    PSI Relief Valve: Yes

    Removal Nut: Yes

    Style: Canister

    Thread Specification: M20 x 1.5

    4. Both filters have the same PSI for the relief valve/bypass valve. It is 14psi/1bar.

    5. What is the purpose of the relief valve/bypass valve? - When the filter material is too clogged up with dirt, oil pressure will increase, and this will activate the bypass allowing the engine oil to bypass the filter material through a valve, and enter the engine. The reason for such a design is so that you will not ever encounter a situation whereby the engine receives zero or too little EO, due to a clogged up filter (e.g. maybe the user never change it for a long time). This protects your engine. If however, you REGULARLY change your oil filter, or like me, I change it before its lifespan reaches, then the bypass valve will unlikely ever be activated.

    6. How often to change oil filter is up to user preference, and riding patterns. You can follow the manual's recommendations, or like me, I find that its a pretty cheap thing to change, so I change it every two EO change.

    Hopes this add to the knowledge base for Honda REVO users.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 18-06-2013 at 11:01 PM.

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    Default DIY Speedometer Bulbs

    @lycan
    Changing your own meter light saves you a lot of money! My is a CB400 Spec 1. I think the bulbs locations are the same for all Super 4 with VTEC. Maybe someone with a non vtec can "tear" apart his/her meter too. ;D

    I only spend USD$ 3.40 for the pair of T10 from dealextreme. Time spent is about 30min as I took my time to figure out how to remove the meter.

    Step 1: Remove the bolts that is holding your headlight and the headlight bracket.



    Step 2 & 3: Remove the bolts from both sides (Circled in Red) that are holding the headlight bracket and the meter. Then remove 3 screws for the covers behind the meter. Circled in purple.



    Step 4: Put out the sockets and you will see the meter light sockets



    Step 5: Replace it with your new T10 and switch on your ignition. If the new T10 doesnt like up, the polarity might be wrong. Pull out, flip it over
    and insert it again. If it still doesnt light up, you have a faulty bulb(unless your light socket wiring is already faulty for some reason).

    WALLA!



    I changed it to orange(same as stock) because I like the colour. However, I wanted to save some electricity so I used LED instead of filament bulbs. It is bright enough to illuminate the whole meter

    Have fun!
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 09:02 AM.

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    Default DIY Section

    How to open & remove the fuel tank


    First remove the seat and unscrew the bolt.


    Unscrew the side cover bolts on both cover sets of the bike (Left - fuse box, Right – Coolant reservoir). Remove both cover sets.


    Here is where you can access to the coolant reservoir on the right side of the bike.


    Disconnect the connector from the tank (Connector as shown after the tank has been removed). There is a small catch where you can disconnect the connector.


    Remove the fuel line, breather tube & drain tube.
    Slowly move the tank backwards and lift up the tank gently to remove it smoothly from the bike frame.



    Remove the 3 screws to access to the air filter.


    This is where you can access to the coolant radiator cap of the bike.



    To fix back the tank, do the procedures in reverse.
    Remember to check that all hoses and connectors are fixed back in sequence.


    Disclaimer: This is a reference of how to remove the fuel tank of CB400.
    Do not remove the tank or any components if you are not familiar or mechanical-trained.
    Any damages or breakages are at owner’s risk.
    Let an experienced or qualified mechanic to handle the bike only.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 31-05-2013 at 05:19 PM.

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    Default DIY Section

    Reserved.........





    To be continued........
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 09:07 AM.

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    Default Recall for owners of CB400 from Honda

    Recall for owners of CB400 for Rear Stop Switch Assembly:
    Recall for owners of CB400.
    If your VIN number falls within the following numbers:

    JH2NC429*8K010001 to JH2NC429*8K010070
    JH2NC429*8M000001 to JH2NC429*8M000174
    JH2NC429*9K100001 to JH2NC429*9K100053

    Due to water penetrates into rear stop switch, leading to poor electricial contact and resulting in possibility of no stop lamp operation while braking by rear brake.

    For the prevention or resolution of this problem, Honda will, at no cost to the owner, carry out the replacement of an improved type rear stop switch assembly.

    Please contact Boon Siew Singapore check and to arrange for inspection if necessary for replacement.

    - http://www.boonsiewhonda.com.sg/boonsiew/news.asp?id=63
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 09:09 AM.

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    Default

    @ProFatSir Honda CB400 Project Big One

    Normal Plug can change at 12k km
    Iridium plug at 25k km
    Denso normal plug type - U24FER9
    Denso Iridium plug type - IUH24

    Engine Oil - Semi syn max-3300km / Fully syn max-7000km
    Fresh oil is always better than good oil.

    Eo filter - Every 10K km or every 2 Oil change

    Air filter check every 6 months, wash or replace every 1 year(20000km).
    Those ride in dusty area (tuas,jurong) will need to wash or replace at 12-15k km, shorter interval as compared to normal riding conditions.

    Coolant - Check/top up every 3 months(for older machine,pb1,Ver S(NC31) replace at 15k km).
    Flush radiator with distilled water only.
    Capacity of coolant needed 2-2.5L(spare coolant included).

    Pb1/Ver S(NC31) - Tank 18L(reserve 3L) I manage to fill 18.5L.

    NC31 Oil change - just the EO 2.7L / with EO filter 2.9L

    Common problem of NC31:
    - Rectifier
    - Water pump

    Will update you more when I can think of more info.

    Nice write up! Keep it up!
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 09:16 AM.

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    Default

    Motorcycle Safety Education

    PREPARING TO RIDE
    1. Wear the right gear.

    2. Become familiar with the motorcycle.

    3. Check the motorcycle equipment.

    4. Be a responsible rider.


    KNOW YOUR MOTORCYCLE
    • Read the owner’s manual first.

    •Start with the right motorcycle foryou.

    •Be familiar with the motorcycle controls.

    •Check the motorcycle before every ride.

    •Keep it in safe riding condition between rides.

    •Avoid add-ons and modificationsthat make your motorcycle harder to handle.


    RIDE WITHIN YOUR ABILITIES
    - “Following too closely” could be a factor in crashes involving motorcyclists.

    - Speeding up to lose someone following too closely only ends up with someone tailgating you at a higher speed.

    - Good experienced riders remain aware of what is going on around them.

    - The best way to help others see your motorcycle is to keep the headlight on — at all times


    GROUP RIDING
    - Do it in a way that promotes safety and doesn’t interfere with the flow of traffic.

    - Place inexperienced riders just behind the leader. That way the more experienced riders can watch them from the back.

    - Plan frequent stops on long rides.

    - Maintain close ranks but at the same time keep a safe distance to allow each rider in the group time and space to react to hazards.

    - Never ride directly alongside another rider.There is no place to go if you have to avoid a car or something on theroad. To talk, wait until you are both stopped.

    - Staggered Formation — This is the best way to keep ranks close yet maintain an adequate space.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Tips for a Safe Drive/Ride

    Long Distance Travel
    - Get a good night's sleep before leaving

    - Avoid driving/riding for long periods.
    Get a co-driver. Take breaks every 2 hours.

    - All rear-seat passengers are required by Malaysia traffic laws to belt up.


    Driving in heavy rain
    - Turn on your headlights and wipers.

    - Double your normal following distance.
    Longer braking distances are required on slippery roads.

    - Avoid hard braking to prevent loss of vehicle control. Etc fishtail or rear wheel skid.

    - Crosswinds may cause your vehicle to veer off course. Look out for warning signs at danger spots and slow down.


    Night Driving
    - Avoid looking directly at oncoming headlights to avoid being blinded.

    - Dip your headlights to avoid blinding oncoming vehicles.

    - Do not speed, drive/ride to your own limit.
    Longer reaction time is needed because of poorer visibilty at night.

    - Flash your high beam when driving/riding around blind corners to notify oncoming motorists of your presence.

    - Overtake only when you are on a straight road.


    Motorcycle & its components are replaceable & rebuildable.
    The human body don't work this way.
    The human body takes time to heal & recover, it might even break and cannot be fixed.

    Please set your priority right.

    No such thing as could afford to buy a bike but couldn't afford appropriate riding gears.

    We are not famous racers or even paid to ride, protect yourself with riding gears to minimize the pain & injuries from the crash.


    It is good to know our bike's own limitations.
    Not to forget our own limitations as well.
    Ride at your own pace. Don't compare with others.
    Ride safe guys.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 09:14 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

    Click on the bike models for Information/Servicing/Maintenance on Kawasaki KR150, Honda CB400 Revo, Suzuki DRZ400SM and Suzuki GSXR

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    Default SparkerS1's Additional Motorcycle Information

    @SparkerS1

    Need to run in the engine first during the required running-in period after overhaul,
    change the engine oil n oil filter at required intervals, you can feel the surge of power once the engine has been broken in, then can whack the bike.

    Bikes manufactured recent years have higher tolerance level thus seldom have the need for overhaul.

    Improper modification of bikes might caused pre-mature damaged/spoilt thus having the need to overhaul and replaced faulty components.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Improper use of engine braking might cause more harm because of the excessive over-drive of the engine might cause the rear wheel to over spin, another factor is the rear wheel will over-drive the engine thus stressing the engine tat might cause pre mature damages.

    But proper use of engine braking with smooth co-ordination of the braking system is good for the engine and ensures a more stable and enjoyable ride.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    There are three categories of oil contaminates active in the engine wear process:

    1. Solid particles, including wear debris and soot, which damage mechanical components and catalyse lubricant breakdown;

    2. Liquid contaminates, including fuel and water, which corrode metals and hinder the functioning of lubricants; and

    3. Gaseous contaminants, including acidic combustion products, which corrode component surfaces and degrade the oil.

    Lube oil contamination accounts for seventy to eighty percent of all failures and wear problems. The wear process promoted by oil contamination leads to diminished fuel efficiency, shorter useful oil service life, increased engine down time, reduced component life, loss of engine performance, and an overall increase in operating costs.

    Contaminant particles responsible for this damage are in the size range of the dynamic lubricant films separating moving engine component surfaces... 10 microns and smaller. Typically these particles pass through the oil filter and continue to build up in the oil system. By making simultaneous contact with opposing surfaces these harmful particles focus the load onto a small area, degrading the surface and perpetuating a chain-reaction-of-wear.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    True speed, best way is to put on dyno machine and do a dyno run. Another way is fix a GPS to find out the actual speed.

    Speedo error is caused by different tire sizes, sprocket sizes etc..........
    Same model of bike has different speedo error % as well, no matter it's a 150cc or 1000cc, speedo error exist, just how much % is the error.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Dyno-run can check the powerband and A/F ratio.
    A PC can fine tune and ensure a smooth powerband curve for maximum performance or long distance cruising depending on wat type of mapping u wan.

    At certain range, more fuel is need (too lean), sometimes less fuel is needed (too rich), thus a PC can do the adjustment and solve the problem.

    Proper re-jetting is need for caburetor bikes also ensures proper A/F ratio for maximum performance without increasing fuel consumption.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Things to take note when buying bike:
    1. Compare the insurance prices
    2. Compare the parts availability and waiting time
    3. The shops/mechanics that can repair the bike
    4. Resale value of the bikes
    5. Sitting posture for rider & pillion

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Wat to look out for if you feel vibration when riding.
    1. Wheel bearings
    2. Steering cone bearing
    3. Fork oil (Time to service fork)
    4. Check for loose chain or worn-out sprockets
    5. Rear shocks too soft (Time to change the shocks or rebuild them)
    6. Check tire pressure.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Poor gas mileage may be due to:
    • Under inflated tires
    • Engine running too cold
    • Transmission malfunction
    • Dragging brakes
    • Misaligned wheels
    • Dirty fuel filter

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://www.doityourself.com/stry/a-c...orcycle-engine
    http://www.doityourself.com/stry/how...r-battery-last

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Information on safety wire & what is it for:
    http://www.sportrider.com/suspension...ues/index.html

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 27-05-2013 at 09:18 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Default

    Although this thread is dedicated to Honda CB400 Revo, I would like to add in some details about Suzuki DRZ400SM for comparing with CB400.






    Dyno Hard break-in

    INFORMATION/MAINTENANCE OF SUZUKI DR-Z400SM

    Engine 4-stroke, DOHC
    Bore x Stroke 3.54 x 2.46 in. (90 x 62.6 mm)
    Compression Ratio 11.3:1
    Fuel System Mikuni BSR36, single
    Cooling Liquid
    Ignition Electronic, CDI
    Lubrication Dry sump
    DIMENSIONS
    Length 87.6 in. (2,225 mm)
    Width 33.7 in. (855 mm)
    Height 47.2 in. (1,200 mm)
    Weight 321 lbs. (146 kg)
    Ground Clearance 10.2 in. (260 mm)
    Wheelbase 57.5 in. (1,460 mm)
    Fuel Capacity 10 litres including reserve
    Seat Height 35 in. (890 mm)
    Transmission 5-speed constant mesh
    Final Drive RK520KZO, 110 links
    Suspension Front: Inverted telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
    Rear: Link type, coil spring, oil damped
    Brakes Front & Rear: Disc
    Tires Front: 120/70 R17 M/C 58H tube type
    Rear: 140/70 R17 M/C 66H tube type

    The Suzuki DR-Z400 is a dual purpose motorcycle. It is powered by a single-cylinder, 398 cc four-stroke engine. Its reliability, low price and decent performance have made it a popular dual-sport choice around the world.
    Mix in street-legal capabilities and unmatched handling. For exceptional performance on the street, the DR-Z400SM offers remarkably smooth performance, along with a rush of torque across the powerband. For crisp handling, it features a lightweight, compact design, complemented by advanced suspension front and rear, including an RM250-derived inverted fork

    The Suzuki DR-Z400SM is an excellent bike for beginners / commuters - cheap to run and maintain, easy to drive in town
    (The above is extracted from sources from the internet)
    Can go to thumpertalk.com or supermoto.sg for more related information, deals and tips



    What is neccessary to be done or fixed on a stock DRZ400SM:
    MCCT- Manual Cam Chain Tensioner where u can manually adjust the cam chain instead of the OEM ACCT (Automatic cam chain tensioner)
    Factory automatic adjusters can back out when the throttle is suddenly closed at higher rpms.
    This allows the cams to momentarily go out of time and can result in bent valves and/or serious engine damage!
    Hydraulic tensioners have a tendency to put too much tension on the chain guide under high rpm/high oil pressure conditions, resulting in premature cam chain wear.
    Installation of a Manual Cam Chain Tensioner will allow you to maintain the proper, constant cam chain tension necessary for reliable hi-performance riding and it will not backout.

    PAIR System- If u have a aftermarket exhaust fixed, best to remove the PAIR system, or else will cause popping and unsteady deceleration, removing it won't give more power, may give a little better response and will give better smoothness.

    Stainless Steel Brake Hose- Enhance braking feel.
    Rubber hoses or mild steel fittings are cheap but we all know how rubber hose bulges under pressure, allows brake fluid to absorb water vapour from the atmosphere and that mild steel fittings rust.

    BRAKING Disc- More friction coefficient, Better resistance to the heat, More initial braking power, More feeling on the lever, Better handling, Less weight, Thicker than stock disc.

    UNABIKER Radiator Guard- Provide awesome side impact protection and help prevent radiator fold-back during a crash.

    Axle Sliders- Protects front fork and rear swing-arm.

    SME Rear Axle Slider Block- Additional protection with concurrence with the axle sliders, protects swing-arm, rear disc, sprocket.

    ThumperTalk Skid Plate- Extra protection specially if for off-road purposes.

    3X3 Air Box Mod- De-restrict the air flow and better performance with an aftermarket Air Filter. Remember to re-jet the stock carburetor to match the A/F ratio.

    Pilot air screw & jet -> Idle till 1/4 throttle
    Throttle valve -> 1/8 till 1/2 throttle
    Jet Needle -> 1/4 till 3/4 Throttle
    Needle jet -> 1/2 till 3/4 throttle
    Main Jet & Air jet -> 3/4 till Full throttle


    CFC Case Shields- Extra protection for Ignition and clutch covers.
    The stock magnesium DRZ engine cases are both thin and brittle.
    As a result, they are very vulnerable to damage (cracks & impact punctures) from the bike's shift/brake lever and rocks when the bike falls.

    Handguards- Prevent clutch and brake levers from breakage/bent during a drop or crash.

    Exhaust Slider- APA Muffler Slider is made from a specially formulated thick, tough, plastic material that resists wear and helps protect your muffler in the event of a crash, much like a frame slider does.
    The slider clamps on securely and the material has built in lubrication molecules that let them slide and not grip the pavement like a soft piece of rubber would.
    Road Racers are enjoying the benefits of Muffler Slider protection when they fall off. It can not easily slide off.

    Remove the kickstand safety switch. DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK.
    If the kickstand is down the bike will not start.
    On jumps and bumps the kickstand will bounce around momentarily killing your engine.
    Thus I remove kickstand sensor.

    Remove the clutch safety switch. DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK.
    If the clutch isn't pulled in, it will not start.
    This just one more electronic switch to break from nowhere, so I remove this safety device.


    What I have done on my Suzuki DRZ400SM:(DO THESE AT YOUR OWN RISK)
    PERFORMANCE
    - Leo Vince Endcan
    - Arrow Header
    - Racewerk Hard Break In
    - Clutch safety switch removed
    - Side-stand safety switch removed
    - Pair System removed
    - Helmet Lock removed
    - 3X3 Air Box Mod with mesh removed
    - K&N Air Filter
    - Re-jetted Mikuni BSR36 carb
    - MCCT

    PROTECTIONS
    - Lightspeed carbon parts(Frame Guard, Front sprocket cover)
    - Motivation Slider (Front & Rear)
    - CFC Case Shields
    - UNABIKER Radiator Guard
    - Radiator Mesh
    - APA Exhaust Slider
    - SME Rear Axle Slider Block
    - Motivation Bar-end Sliders
    - ThumperTalk Skid Plate

    ACCESSORIES
    - EASTON 35mm Handlerbar with Clamp & Hardware
    - HEL Brake Hose (Front & Rear)
    - BRAKING Brake Pads
    - BRAKING 320mm SK Front Disc
    - BRAKING OEM Caliper Bracket for 320mm Disc
    - BRAKING Rear Disc
    - DRC Edge-2 LED Tail Light
    - DRC Signal Light
    - Acerbis Front Fender
    - Blue Tinted Mirror
    - R1 Throttle Tube
    - PLaylife Grips
    - ZETA Engine Oil Dipstick
    - Zeta Unbreakable Clutch & Brake Lever
    - Sunline Gear Shifter
    - Supersporx Sprocket
    - DID X-ring chain
    - Pirelli DIABLO tires
    - Juzzwheel Customised Decal
    - Osram Nightbreaker H4 Headlight Bulb
    - Rim sticker
    - Lizard Skin
    - New Slim IU unit

    SERVICING
    - NGK Iridium Spark Plug CR8-EIX
    - Motul 300V Factoryline 4T Engine Oil
    - OWS 3 in 1 Treatment
    - Radiator & Coolant Reserve using Engine ICE
    - Special Fuel Additives Used
    - Latest Fuel Consumption: 25 km/L


    Bike Servicing/Maintenance
    Basic servicing like service carburetor every 6 months and yearly servicing can keep the bike in good running condition.
    Engine Oil: Semi-syn change every 2000km
    Fully-syn change every 4000km
    (Can + up to 1000km for fully/semi syn)
    Oil Filter: Change every 2-3 EO change
    Air Filter: Service once a year or every 20,000km
    Coolant: Flush at least once a year
    Brake Hose: Bleed every 14-18 months
    Fork Oil: Change every 2 years or 20000km
    Change spark plug when faulty, spark plug can last at least 10000km.
    Change chain and sprocket at least once a year, can last more than a year if u clean and lube your chain periodically.

    Other basic maintenance can be done periodically.
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 07-08-2012 at 09:51 PM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    @ReZaF

    Information about the Honda CB 400, which is listed as a production model, is sparse; it features a new fuel-injected four-cylinder, which should lend it improved emissions over its previous carbureted version. This variant is clad with a fairing.



    The Honda CB400SS Super Four Hyper VTec is on display as a production model, and features naked styling (as opposed to the fairing-equipped Super Bol D'Or variant) and fuel injection.


    The Honda CB1300 Super Bol D'Or ABS, which is scheduled for release, shrouds its squarish headlight with a fairing.

    The CB1300 Super Four ABS is listed as "scheduled for release" by Honda; little else has been disclosed about the bike.


    @hyssnemesis
    this is my baby..




    @ethanleeqh
    My humble bike for your viewing, guys

    1. Tinted tail lights


    2. Tunnel


    3. Bur bur burflame


    4. Jing wu men & the headers


    5. Black pillion bar covers

    Thank you!


    @ResmeN
    I finally managed to take the bike for a few spins after putting on the clipons and uploaded some pics.

    First impressions, with the stock handlebar it feels like the rider is on the bike and sitting fairly upright with not as much feedback from front.
    With clipons the rider feels more at one with the bike in a typical forward leaning semi sports stance with good feedback from front.
    Due to lowering and not going up all the stock cables were used and no modifications were required though mechanic suggested we perhaps go for braided brake lines down the track.

    I was after a sporty riding position. Due to my height the stock handlebars felt they were too close to me and made me sit fairly upright like on a scooter but not as bad so I am happy with the end result.

    I put on a set of mirrors I got from ebay but didn't like the rear view vision so put the stock ones back on.

    As this is a daily ridden street bike we opted to put the clipons on top of the fork next to the triple clamp otherwise we were going to put them below.
    Have to thank Fazli, khao and Kelvin (Unique Motorsports) for their constructive feedback in pointing me along the way.

    Negatives:
    Feels like I'm learning to ride all over again.
    Slow speed manoeuvring is a bit difficult but will get used to it.

    Regardless of what else they may be for others (such as back pain, discomfort etc) I wanted this riding position and have no complaints so far but time will tell what the future will hold.
    Sometimes you need to make sacrifices to get what you want.

    CB400 revo with stock handlebars:

    CB400 revo with gilles tooling 41mm clipons



    Before:


    After:




    So with a simple mod we went from this


    By adjusting a screw we could end up with anywhere between these and more



    More posts about this in this thread.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Pictures & Photos (II)

    Pics of Hakim's throttle body.
    Here they are:











    @khoa9876
    This is clipon handle bar conversion kit for Revo + scottt damper. Many thing is very new for Revo bikers



    M4 mono block + Agras CNC bracket (japan)
    Front fender is from WR's (japan) 100% real carbon, very nice


    rear: brembo billet, GP type
    it is rear set K-factory on my bike, you can offer it at Motovation or Unique motor (Kelvin)




    most parts from Japan, some from USA, and some from Europe. You can order them from Alvin Motovation

    Actually, clipon handle bar of Hurricane is No 1, then CF-Posh is No 2.
    Very nice and safe


    CRG supersport clutch set, you can change into Brembo but I think CRG is very good for handling and control













    My Bike after tune up many racing parts from Japan. many photos will be upload

    I listed the upgraded items below (USD only)

    1/ Body
    - SUbframe: Active (Japan) 590$
    - Engine guard: (Honda): 290$
    - Rear suspension height: Yamamoto: 398$
    - Rear carriage: Hurricane: 270$
    - License plate support: Daytona: 230$
    - Front fender carbon: WR: 650$
    - Rear hugger carbon: Spicer: 640$
    - Injector cover, carbon WR: 440$
    - Main stand: Honda : 398$
    - Headlight fairing: Daytona : 660$
    - Front fork balancer: Sansei racing: 250$
    - Tank protector, carbon: Spycer: 180$
    - Seat GEL: 139$
    - Sub rear handle: Kijima: 120$
    - Tank cap: DMV (Italia) not Taiwan: 390$
    - Rear set: K-factory: 790$
    - Quickshift: Battle Racing: 440$

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    @SparkerS1



    Honda CB400 Revo 2008 1st Gen


    Black Gen Revo
    Dyno Hard Break-In By Racewerks



    Seng Kwang Stainless Steel Crashbars

    Attachment 195626
    Brembo RCS 19 + Evo Tech Brake Reservoir + STAR Performance Steel Braided Hose


    @kimmeng
    when i get yoshi that time, only got 2 types.
    1 is stainless steel, another is the carbon fibre one lor.



    @Schecter
    Hey guys, finally got a decent photo of my bike.


    Doing my bike up slowly~


    @Fazli
    For our stock bars we will be using the Honda OEM bar end sliders. Notice the tabs on the ends inserted into the bars...

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

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    Pictures & Photos (IV)


    Yoshimura R77 Metal Magic


    Yoshimura R77 Titanium Blue


    AFAM 520 O-ring Sprocket & DID Chain Setup


    Plain Radiator Mesh


    Fuse box from ABS Revo

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

    Click on the bike models for Information/Servicing/Maintenance on Kawasaki KR150, Honda CB400 Revo, Suzuki DRZ400SM and Suzuki GSXR

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    Reserved.........





    To be continued........

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    Godsendworx Custom Radiator Guard

    1.Why do I need a radiator guard?

    ◾There will always be debris/ small stones from the roads hitting our bike's radiator during riding. Over a long period of exposure, unprotected radiator will have the fins clogged up with tiny stones/ debris.

    ◾For the more severe case scenario, damages caused by high impact hit from stones might even cause leakages to your radiator. If you're on the track and that will pretty much take you out of the race.

    ◾Even for street bikes which only commutes in Singapore, your radiator would be expose to possible hits from the road debris as well.



    2.What is the material of your radiator guard?

    ◾Our Radiator Guards are engineered so they are manufactured to be heat resistant & anti-rust interlocking metal wires that forms a formation "metal shield" which provides MAXIMUM PROTECTION to our bike's radiator and yet, allowing it to "breathe freely" with no restriction to the air-flow.

    3.Will the radiator guard restricts airflow and cause overheating?

    ◾We have installed on over a thousand bikes in Singapore, and so far, we have received NO complaints on a overheating bike due to an installed radiator guard.

    ◾On the positive side, we have received hundreds of reviews on the radiator protection that our product has provided!


    4.How much does it cost me to get a radiator guard fixed?

    ◾For custom designs, price varies according to the complexity of your chosen design.

    ◾Please send us your design in order in order to get an accurate quotation.


    5.How do you secure the radiator guard to my bike?

    ◾We uses ultra fine metal wires to secure the radiator guard to your radiator. The wires are about 1mm diameter hence it will not damage your radiator fins and are strong in securing the radiator guard firmly.

    ◾The wires are high temperature resistant and we have been using them without any issue for years.

    ◾In addition, the securing of the radiator guard is done professionally and it can be easily removed if required.


    6.Do we have to provide our own design?

    ◾You may choose from our Gallery or you may even search for your own design online (e.g. Google image search) and sent us the image itself or simply provide the image's hyperlink to us at godsendworx@hotmail.com


    7.Is installation provided with your radiator guard?

    ◾Yes, it is a free service whenever a radiator guard is purchased from us.


    8.For custom designed radiator guards, will the paintwork last?

    ◾There is no guarantee on this as it is dependent on the exposure of the radiator guard to dusty environments. The paintwork will darken gradually over time. Reason being, that the dust from the roads will stick to our heated radiator guard while we are riding. Usually from a period from 6-12 months (estimated).

    ◾Again, it depends on the level of exposure to different environment. Our radiator guard itself is rust-resistant and tolerant to high temp accumulated during city riding or even during touring or track riding.

    ◾We do have returning customers whenever they have changed a new bike or wished to have a new design done. And of course, they will definitely enjoy superb discount rates as our appreciation.


    9.How do we discuss about the design?

    ◾Discussion on your mesh project is purely done online at the comfort of your own home, do try to stick to using email as our means of communication so that we can capture your request accurately. HP provided by me is meant for meetup arrangements only.


    10.Any maintenance required for the radiator guard?

    ◾Basically.. NO EFFORT needed. It is usually an "Install and forget" kind of thing. You will NOT need to remove it for washing. Simply wash your bike as per normal. Just avoid hard-scrubbing the mesh will do.

    ◾Artwork painted on the mesh is protected by more then 5 layers of lacquered. E.g. when the paintwork starts to darken e.g. after 8 months of riding, you may use a sponge with light soap on it and clean it gently.

    ◾To save the hassle! You can just contact us for re-mesh service! We have regular supporters who frequent us every 1-2 years or as and when they have change their ride. As mentioned, we treasure our customer loyalty.. hence.. you'll get a fresh radiator mesh with a new design. All these at an amazing price!


    11.How do I start ordering a radiator guard?

    ◾Please click on the following link for the details:http://www.facebook.com/notes/godsen...53832831304849


    Quick Links:

    Purchase Order (PO):
    http://www.facebook.com/notes/godsen...53832831304849

    Installation Venue
    http://www.facebook.com/notes/godsen...53843644637101


    Godsendworx's Testimonials
    http://www.facebook.com/notes/godsen...59159894105476
    Last edited by SparkerS1; 31-05-2013 at 12:18 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

    Click on the bike models for Information/Servicing/Maintenance on Kawasaki KR150, Honda CB400 Revo, Suzuki DRZ400SM and Suzuki GSXR

    Facebook HONDA CB400 REVO

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    Last edited by SparkerS1; 31-05-2013 at 12:11 AM.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

    Click on the bike models for Information/Servicing/Maintenance on Kawasaki KR150, Honda CB400 Revo, Suzuki DRZ400SM and Suzuki GSXR

    Facebook HONDA CB400 REVO

    Can't post a new thread ?? Read HERE

    SBF Garage Sales Act ---> Read HERE

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    Anyone who wish to contribute to the above post, please kindly PM me.

    All the thanks to those who contributed in making this thread a Super4 encyclopaedia.

    I appreciate all relevant information/problems/solutions given.

    Yamaha RXZ, Kawasaki ZX KR150, Yamaha Spark135, Honda CB400 REVO NC42, Suzuki DRZ400SMK8, Aprilia RS125, Suzuki GSXR600K9

    Click on the bike models for Information/Servicing/Maintenance on Kawasaki KR150, Honda CB400 Revo, Suzuki DRZ400SM and Suzuki GSXR

    Facebook HONDA CB400 REVO

    Can't post a new thread ?? Read HERE

    SBF Garage Sales Act ---> Read HERE

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