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Thread: preload

  1. #1
    Xach
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    what tools do u ppl use for adjusting preload setting? its the big "nut" that suppports the spring right? there seems to be two layer/piece...what's the procedure for adjusting? anyone help??

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    BoBOKik
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    erm.. i think u r nt lookin at the right thing... preload is adjust wif 'c' clamp.. normally comes wif yr bikes took kit... u jus look for a 'c' shaped clamp/spanner tool.. den preload is jus a funny dunno wat u call thing.. jus abt yr spring...

     

     
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    what tools do u ppl use for adjusting preload setting? its the big "nut" that suppports the spring right? there seems to be two layer/piece...what's the procedure for adjusting? anyone help??
    This is the stuff that drive me crazy....very difficult to tune to the one that can take good corner and yet be able to absorb irregularity of the road. clockwise make it stiffer anti closewise make it softer....
    Ride it like you stole it
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    This is the stuff that drive me crazy....very difficult to tune to the one that can take good corner and yet be able to absorb irregularity of the road. clockwise make it stiffer anti closewise make it softer....
    Mine has a wide flat ring with holes that you can twist with a c-spanner to get any of the 7 preload settings available. The two-ring type is a little trickier - if you want to decrease preload, loosen the top locking ring then adjust the spring ring accordingly; if you want to increase the preload, adjust the spring ring and lock down its position by screwing down the locking ring.

    Suspension setting is all about compromise. It all depends on how and where you ride.

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    Xach
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    This is the stuff that drive me crazy....very difficult to tune to the one that can take good corner and yet be able to absorb irregularity of the road. clockwise make it stiffer anti closewise make it softer....
    Mine has a wide flat ring with holes that you can twist with a c-spanner to get any of the 7 preload settings available. The two-ring type is a little trickier - if you want to decrease preload, loosen the top locking ring then adjust the spring ring accordingly; if you want to increase the preload, adjust the spring ring and lock down its position by screwing down the locking ring.

    Suspension setting is all about compromise. It all depends on how and where you ride.
    sounds like the suspension on my bike...
    anyway...is it a must to remove some parts of the bike(like the seat?) to get adjust the setting? its damn cramp in there without removing anything..and i dunno to remove what to gain access

    increasing preload will make the suspension feel...softer/harder?

  6. #6
    ZZR-Pilot
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    sounds like the suspension on my bike...
    anyway...is it a must to remove some parts of the bike(like the seat?) to get adjust the setting? its damn cramp in there without removing anything..and i dunno to remove what to gain access

    increasing preload will make the suspension feel...softer/harder?
    No need to remove anything. The shock should be accessible with a c-spanner. Just be sure you get a good grip on the ring with the spanner... or you'll end up with bloody knuckles

    And yes, increasing preload makes the spring feel harder and makes the bike feel slightly taller (since the spring no longer compresses as much - or less 'sag' as bikers call that - when you sit on it).

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    This is the stuff that drive me crazy....very difficult to tune to the one that can take good corner and yet be able to absorb irregularity of the road. clockwise make it stiffer anti closewise make it softer....
    Mine has a wide flat ring with holes that you can twist with a c-spanner to get any of the 7 preload settings available. The two-ring type is a little trickier - if you want to decrease preload, loosen the top locking ring then adjust the spring ring accordingly; if you want to increase the preload, adjust the spring ring and lock down its position by screwing down the locking ring.

    Suspension setting is all about compromise. It all depends on how and where you ride.
    sounds like the suspension on my bike...
    anyway...is it a must to remove some parts of the bike(like the seat?) to get adjust the setting? its damn cramp in there without removing anything..and i dunno to remove what to gain access

    increasing preload will make the suspension feel...softer/harder?
    y dont u try adjustin yr damping and compression... yr preload shd remain more or less constant

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    Xach
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    i dunno the kr stock shock can adjust the compression and rebound setting or not(cheapo?)...got also dunno where to adjust...

    got pics to show?

  9. #9
    ZZR-Pilot
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    Damping (rebound & compression) adjustments are usually found on higher end shocks. Damping adjusters look like little screws that you can turn with a flathead screwdriver of small knobs that you can turn with your fingers.

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    henRRy
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    i dunno the kr stock shock can adjust the compression and rebound setting or not(cheapo?)...got also dunno where to adjust...

    got pics to show?
    KRR no rebound adjustment lah , get a 2A then can do all this...

  11. #11
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    DAmping adjustment comes after u get the RIGHT RIDER SAG.

    and Rider sag is achieved by fiddling with ya preload....if this isnt right, no matter how range of damping adjustment ya given, it will never handles properly.
    Guru IL4, can elaborate a bit? I have damping and preload adjustments on my bike but I don't really know what they do with them and haven't touch them yet. seems that my shock is a bit soft of late and the dampin gis set to the highest liao...

     

     
  12. #12
    BoBOKik
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    tis wat i read from ohlins site....

    Setting the spring preload

    1. Measuring:


    Preload on the spring/springs is very important, because it effects the height of the motorcycle and the fork angle. Consequently, handling characteristics can be changed, even negatively. Proceed as follows (it will be much easier if done by two persons):

    * Place the motorcyle on a smooth flat surface.

    * Lift up the rear end to a fully extended position

    * Measure the distance, eg, from the lower edge of the rear mudguard or from the point marked by a piece of tape, immediately above the rear wheel axle, to the wheel axle. (A)


    * Make a similar measurement on the front axle, eg. from the bottom of the upper fork to he front wheel axle. The fork must also be fully extended. (A)

    * Allow the motorcycle (without rider) to apply load on the springs and repeat the measuring procedure. (B)

    * Then take the same measurements with the rider and the equipment on the motorcycle. It is important that the rider has the correct riding posture, so that the weight is balanced on the front and the rear wheel in the same way as when riding. ©


    The difference may not deivate from the sizes:

    Without rider: (A-B)

    Rear: Road and Track 5 - 10 mm
    Front: Road and Track 25 - 30 mm

    With rider: (A-C)

    Rear: Road and Track 30 - 40 mm
    Front: Road and Track 35 - 48 mm

  13. #13
    BoBOKik
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    By utilizing the adjustment possiblities you can test by trial and error, and learn how they affect your motorcycle.

    Always begin test riding the motorcycle with all adjustments at their i.e. delivery setting. Choose a short run of varying character, ie, long and sharp bends, hard and soft bumps. Keep to the same run and adjust only one setting at a time.

    Start withe the rebound damping

    If the motorcycle feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy then the rebound damping should be increased. Begin by turning the adjusting knob 1/2 round clockwise. Test run again and adjust 1/4 back if it felt too hard and bumpy.

    If the motorcycle is hard and bumpy, especially over a series of bumps, then the rebound damping should be reduced. Turn 1/2 round anticlockwise, test run and make any necessary correction to 2 steps.

    Compression damping

    If the motorcycle feels soft, has low riding position and a tendency to bottom easily in long dips then the compression damping shoud be increased. Screw 1/2 round clockwise. If this was too much then turn back 1/2 round anticlockwise.

    If the motorcycle feels harsh and has hard resilience: eg, over changes in the road paving, then the compression damping must be reduced. Screw 1/2 round anticlockwise. Test run and make any necessary adjustment.

    When you have sufficient feel of the motorcycle then you can make further fine adjustments. It is the feelin and experience that counts. When you feel that you have achieved an improvement, go back to where you started and check once more. Be observant of other relevant factors such as tyres, tempreture etc. Test run to make sure whether further fine adjustment should be made.

    (ps. Not all bike's suspension are fully adjustable, so just try to adjust what ever adjustment that your bike has base on this guideline, and i have modifty the instruction to suit normal stock suspension.. as Ohlins have more adjustment to play with.. i.e. instead of 1/2 round clockwise, Ohlins uses in form of 4 clicks clockwise.. so if your uses clicks, then maybe you can trying using 4 clicks instead of 1/2 round turns..)

    hope tis can be helpful to u guys...

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    Suspension and Springs

    What's all this ruckus about suspension these days? It seems everyone is clued in that suspension setup can be a key to riding fast and safely, but how do you do it? No matter what shock or fork you have, they all require proper adjustment to work to their maximum potential. Suspension tuning isn't rocket science, and if you follow step-by-step procedures you can make remarkable improvements in your bike's handling characteristics.
    The first step to setting up any bike is to set the spring sag and determine if you have the correct-rate springs. Spring sag is the amount the springs compress between fully topped out and fully loaded with the rider on board in riding position. It is also referred to as static ride height or static sag. My company, Race Tech, (909/594-7755) has an advanced method of checking spring sag that I'll describe.

    If you've ever measured sag before, you may have noticed that if you check it three or four times, you can get three or four times, you can get three or four different numbers without changed anything. We'll tell you why this occurs and how to handle it.

    REAR END
    Step 1: Extend the suspension completely by getting the wheel off the ground. It helps to have a few friends around. On bikes with sidestands the bike can usually be carefully rocked up on the stand to unload the suspension. Most race stands will not work because the suspension will still be loaded by resting on the swingarm rather than the wheel. Measure the distance from the axle vertically to some point on the chassis (metric figures are easiest and more precise; Figure 1). Mark this reference point because you'll need to refer to it again. This measurement is L1. If the measurement is not exactly vertical the sag numbers will be inaccurate (too low).

    Step 2: Take the bike off the stand and put the rider on board in riding position. Have a third person balance the bike from the front. If accuracy is important to you, you must take friction of the linkage into account. This is where our procedure is different: We take two additional measurements. First, push down on the rear end about 25mm (1") and let it extend very slowly.

    Where it stops, measure the distance between the axle and the mark on chassis again. If there were no drag in the linkage the bike would come up a little further. It's important that you do not bounce! This measurement is L2.

    Step 3: Have your assistant lift up on the rear of the bike about 25mm and let it down very slowly. Where it stops, measure it. If there were no drag it would drop a little further. Remember, don't bounce! This measurement it L3.

    Step 4: The spring sag is in the middle of these two measurements. In fact, if there were no drag in the linkage, L2 and L3 would be the same. To get the actual sag figure you find the midpoint by averaging the two numbers and subtracting them from the fully extended measurement L1: static spring sag = L1 -[(L2 + L3) / 2].

    Step 5: Adjust the preload with whatever method applies to your bike. Spring collars are common, and some benefit from the use of special tools. In a pinch you can use a blunt chisel to unlock the collars and turn the main adjusting collar. If you have too much sag you need more preload; if you have too little sag you need less preload. For road race bikes, rear sag is typically 25 to 30mm. Street riders usually use 30 to 35mm. Bikes set up for the track are compromise when ridden on the street. The firmer settings commonly used on the tract are generally not recommended (or desirable) for road work.

    You might notice the Sag Master measuring tool (available from Race Tech) in the pictures. It's a special tool made to assist you in measuring sag by allowing you to read sag directly without subtracting. It can also be used as a standard tape measure.

    Measuring front-end sag is very similar to the rear. However, it' much more critical to take seal drag into account on the front end because it is more pronounced.

    FRONT END
    Step 1: Extend the fork completely and measure from the wiper (the dust seal atop the slider) to the bottom of the triple clamp (or lower fork casting on inverted forks; Figure 2). This measurement is L1.

    Step 2: Take the bike off the sidestand, and put the rider on board in riding position. Get and assistant to balance the bike from the rear, then push down on the front end and let it extend very slowly.



    Where it stops, measure the distance between the wiper and the bottom of the triple clamp again. Do not bounce. This measurement is L2.

    Step 3: Lift up on the front end and let it drop very slowly. Where it stops, measure again. Don't bounce. This measurement is L3. Once again, L2 and L3 are different due to stiction or drag in the seals and bushings, which is particularly high for telescopic front ends.

    Step 4: Just as with the front, halfway between L2 and L3 is where the sag would be with no drag or stiction. Therefore L2 and L3 must be averaged and subtracted from L1 to calculate true spring sag: static spring sag = L1 - [l2 + l3) / 2].

    Step 5: To adjust sag use the preload adjusters, if available, or vary the length of the preload spaces inside the fork.

    Street bikes run between 25 and 33 percent of their total travel, which equates to 30 to 35mm. Roadrace bikes usually run between 25 and 30mm.

    This method of checking sag and taking stiction into account also allows you to check the drag of the linkage and seals. It follows that the greater the difference between the measurements (pushing down and pulling up), the worse the stiction. A good linkage (rear sag) has less than 3mm (0.12") difference, and a bad one has more than 10mm (0.39"). Good forks have less than 15mm difference, and we've seen forks with more than 50mm. (Gee, I wonder why they're harsh?)

    It's important to stress that there is no magic number. If you like the feel of the bike with less or more sag than these guidelines, great. Your personal sag and front-to-rear sag bias will depend on chassis geometry, track or road conditions, tire selection and rider weight and riding preference.

    Using different sag front and rear will have huge effect on steering characteristics. More sag on the front or less sag on the rear will make the bike turn more slowly. Increasing sag will also decrease bottoming resistance, though spring rate has a bigger effect than sag. Racers often use less sag to keep the bike clearance, and since roadraces work greater than we see on the street, they require a stiffer setup. Of course, setting spring sag is only first step of dialing in your suspension, so stay tuned for future articles on spring rates and damping.

    -Paul Thede



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Magazine: Sport Rider
    Issue : August 1995

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    Anyone know how to adjust the WR200 rear suspension? Want to make it a tiny bit lower.

    I've attached some pics of the rear shock. can explain what the 2 screws do?

    thanks

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    Originally posted by S750WP@Feb 1 2003, 11:25 AM
    Suspension and Springs

    ** Edit to remove long quote **

    -Paul Thede


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Magazine: Sport Rider
    Issue : August 1995
    hey bro, read bout the suspesion thingee on ur post....can help me adjust my suspension damping?? treat u coffee. im ridin honda 954 front fork using minus screw driver, rear using clicks

    Previous Rides: RXK 135, S4 Project Big 1, S4 Vtec1, ST1100 Pan European, Cbr954, K7 600, FJR1300 ABS, SilverWing FJS 400.
    Current Rides: FIT 1.3 GF MoonRoof.

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    Originally posted by FunkyChicken@Dec 14 2006, 11:48 PM
    hey bro, read bout the suspesion thingee on ur post....can help me adjust my suspension damping?? treat u coffee. im ridin honda 954 front fork using minus screw driver, rear using clicks
    yo bro, when u change to CBR954 one ? where is ur ST11 ? i'm si yuan from SP mechatronics. always see u at north side one. I also want do the suspension setting.
    My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.

  18. #18
    quizesilver
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    if u really wan.
    u may refer to this link

    http://www.gostar-racing.com/club/motorcyc...sion_set-up.htm

  19. #19
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    Originally posted by Vuitton@Dec 15 2006, 02:08 AM
    yo bro, when u change to CBR954 one ? where is ur ST11 ? i'm si yuan from SP mechatronics. always see u at north side one. I also want do the suspension setting.
    wahh so fast laio climb to cbr6 arr.. juz got it last mth. intended to get cbr6 at loois, skali when i came back sold liao... he quote me 12.5k.

    saw tix 954 and fell in love with it, traded in my st11!! hahahaha

    btw i adjusted my rebound and compression softer coz i fy my bike too bumpy and doesnt absorb the shocks. now manouevering is more sweet and confident, can cup corner more fast....hahaha

    Previous Rides: RXK 135, S4 Project Big 1, S4 Vtec1, ST1100 Pan European, Cbr954, K7 600, FJR1300 ABS, SilverWing FJS 400.
    Current Rides: FIT 1.3 GF MoonRoof.

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    Originally posted by FunkyChicken@Dec 18 2006, 02:09 PM
    wahh so fast laio climb to cbr6 arr.. juz got it last mth. intended to get cbr6 at loois, skali when i came back sold liao... he quote me 12.5k.

    saw tix 954 and fell in love with it, traded in my st11!! hahahaha

    btw i adjusted my rebound and compression softer coz i fy my bike too bumpy and doesnt absorb the shocks. now manouevering is more sweet and confident, can cup corner more fast....hahaha
    I just get my preload, damping and rear shocked adjusted to my weight. the mechanics used the same theory as the person told us in forum. measuring from the axle. U can try going kaki bukit ave 1 behind Sanfu motor, Bikeworkz there. Nice workmanship and service attitude.
    I found my cornering is much stable without bouncing up and there so much. What is ur tires pressure for front and rear ?
    My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.

  21. #21
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    had my suspension setting done..the riders sag agak agak bout 20 to 30mm... damn tis shocks are good, my ride is more confident. wonder ohlins and other top end aftermarket shocks feels like.

    aniwae interesting stuff u all gave. it really helps me alot.

    Previous Rides: RXK 135, S4 Project Big 1, S4 Vtec1, ST1100 Pan European, Cbr954, K7 600, FJR1300 ABS, SilverWing FJS 400.
    Current Rides: FIT 1.3 GF MoonRoof.

     

     
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    did my forks rebuilt and front fork and rear shocks setting to my weight.
    impressively good tho bit ex...but to my dismay, lotsa scratches on my front fender and fork. the guy did in in a rush too. waited for an hr plus before he starts doin my bike. and worst still use a car jack instead of a paddoack stand to lift my front wheel.

    i wud recommend u guys BIKELAB!! friendly, proper tools, do it wif passion. no use boasting u participate in ahm bla bla bla...whereas ur service not up to standard.

    Previous Rides: RXK 135, S4 Project Big 1, S4 Vtec1, ST1100 Pan European, Cbr954, K7 600, FJR1300 ABS, SilverWing FJS 400.
    Current Rides: FIT 1.3 GF MoonRoof.

  23. #23
    Non Stop Racing
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    Quote Originally Posted by FunkyChicken View Post
    did my forks rebuilt and front fork and rear shocks setting to my weight.
    impressively good tho bit ex...but to my dismay, lotsa scratches on my front fender and fork. the guy did in in a rush too. waited for an hr plus before he starts doin my bike. and worst still use a car jack instead of a paddoack stand to lift my front wheel.

    i wud recommend u guys BIKELAB!! friendly, proper tools, do it wif passion. no use boasting u participate in ahm bla bla bla...whereas ur service not up to standard.
    which shop that scratches ur front fork ??? bike lab ?
    'R6' RedlineRocketRedesignRazor sharpRevolutionaryReward 6.

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    How to set suspension sag
    By MCN Technical Staff

    Suspension

    29 November 2006 15:38


    What is sag?

    Loaded sag is the name given to the amount of suspension travel used up when the bike settles with a rider on board. To alter the sag you need to adjust how much the springs in the forks and the spring in the rear shock are compressed (also called altering the springs’ tension or altering the pre-load). As a very broad guide a road bike should have 25-30mm of loaded sag at the front and 20-22mm at the rear.

    Why bother?

    Adjusting the sag to match your weight will ensure your bike's suspension works in its optimal range. This will improve ride and handling and boost your confidence as well as making the bike safer to ride.

    Don’t do it if…

    You are particularly rubbish at very simple maths, or own a bike that doesn’t have pre-load adjustment – you can but it’s very specialised and includes new springs, fork oil and money.

    Stuff you’ll need

    A friend, a socket that fits the front fork pre-load adjusters (though some bikes only have facility for adjustment by spanner), and a C-spanner to turn the rear spring’s pre-load ring. Check the bike’s toolkit and if there isn’t one you’ll have to visit a specialist tool shop. You’ll also need a small cable tie, a tape measure, a notepad and a pen.

    What can go wrong?

    The worst that can happen is that you get completely confused or ‘lost’ with which way you need to adjust the pre-load. As long as you have an owners’ manual, or have access to the stock settings (dealer can supply), you can revert to standard and start again.

    Anything else?

    This guide shows you how to set sag for a solo rider. If most of your riding is two-up or with luggage, you’ll need more pre-load at both ends (especially the rear) to compensate.



    1. Before you do anything, check that the bike is on stock suspension settings. Second-hand bikes are particularly likely to have been mucked around with. Revert to the settings given in the owners’ handbook, or from a dealer. The reason for this is to have a solid base setting to start from to reduce the chance of confusion.



    2. Starting at the front of the bike, fit a cable tie around the slider part of one fork leg (the chromed bit). With the aid of a friend, pull the bike over on its sidestand to lift the front wheel clear of the ground so the suspension ‘tops out’. Slide and butt the cable-tie against the fork seal.



    3. On upside-down forks (pictured) measure the distance between the fork seal and the point where the slider joins the lower casting (the mount for the wheel spindle and brake caliper). Note the measurement and call it ‘A’. On conventional right-way-up forks measure from the fork seal to the underside of the lower fork yoke instead.



    4. Sit on the bike in your normal kit and riding position while a friend balances it (without applying force up or down). The cable tie will move as the forks compress. Measure from the fixed reference point on the casting to the top of the cable tie (or on right-way-up forks, from the bottom of the tie to the fixed point on the yoke). Call this distance ‘B’.



    5. Your sag value is simply A minus B. If you have too much sag, say 40mm, you need to increase the fork tension/pre-load by turning both pre-load adjusters in/clockwise. Start by increasing pre-load one turn on each adjuster and then repeat the measurement procedure until the ideal sag figure is achieved.



    6. To measure the rear suspension’s sag, lift the rear of the bike until the rear wheel is off the deck. Measure vertically from the centre of the rear wheel spindle to a fixed reference point on the chassis. On the ZX-10R used here we used the bottom of the bungee point. Make a note of measurement ‘A’.



    7. Again sit on the bike as if riding normally. The bike has to be supporting all your weight to get an accurate measurement, so feet must be on pegs. Try parking next to a wall and balancing yourself with an elbow while your pal does the measuring. Again measure from the centre of the spindle to the fixed reference point for measurement ‘B’.



    8. Subtract measurement ‘B’ from measurement ‘A’ to get the rear sag figure. Now it’s just the simple matter of adjusting the amount of pre-load on the rear spring (or springs if it’s a twin-shock set-up) and re-measuring until A minus B is in the right range. More pre-load will reduce sag, less pre-load will add to it.



    9. Rear pre-load adjusters can differ, but the principle is the same – by reducing the length of the spring you increase the tension in it. On the ZX-10R you need to use a
    C-spanner to slacken off the upper locking ring first. More often than not, it’s easier to use a hammer and drift to crack it loose.



    10. Back off the locking ring by hand to give more access to the adjusting ring. Fit the C-spanner to the adjusting ring and turn clockwise to increase the pre-load, or anti-clockwise to reduce it. Adjust by one to two turns at a time then re-check the sag. Go steady as C-spanners are notorious for slipping off.



    11. Once you’re happy with the sag figure, tighten the locking ring to the adjusting ring, being careful not to move the adjusting ring while doing so. Two C-spanners are ideal, otherwise hold the adjuster ring with the C-spanner and get your friend to tap the locking ring against the adjuster with a drift and hammer.



    12. Push up and down on both ends of the bike to ‘settle’ the springs and re-check the sag figure. Take the bike for a test ride to assess the improvement in ride quality. If you haven’t been able to get the sag figure you desire then the chances are different springs (with a harder/softer spring rate) are needed from aftermarket suspension specialists.
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  25. #25
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    wat's the meaning of Preload ,Rebound and Compression in simple terms?


    ideal for track what's the recommended settings for a 60 - 65 kg?

    "But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. Now if you know what you're worth then go out and get what you're worth."

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    ivant
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    Quote Originally Posted by 299 View Post
    wat's the meaning of Preload ,Rebound and Compression in simple terms?


    ideal for track what's the recommended settings for a 60 - 65 kg?
    Preload - Also called spring preload. Its how much the spring is pre-compressed. Its used for setting sag.

    Rebound damping - resistance of the fork/shock from extending

    Compression damping - resistance of the fork/shock from compressing

    You can try 40mm front and 30mm rear for rider sag. There are no recommended settings for damping. Its a matter of preference. The ultimate measure will be the stopwatch though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ivant View Post
    Preload - Also called spring preload. Its how much the spring is pre-compressed. Its used for setting sag.

    Rebound damping - resistance of the fork/shock from extending

    Compression damping - resistance of the fork/shock from compressing

    You can try 40mm front and 30mm rear for rider sag. There are no recommended settings for damping. Its a matter of preference. The ultimate measure will be the stopwatch though.
    how do u set 40mm front and 30mm rear?

    "But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. Now if you know what you're worth then go out and get what you're worth."

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    ivant
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    Quote Originally Posted by 299 View Post
    how do u set 40mm front and 30mm rear?
    By adjusting preload.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ivant View Post
    By adjusting preload.
    How to get the measurement? Any reference to take?

    "But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. Now if you know what you're worth then go out and get what you're worth."

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    Quote Originally Posted by 299 View Post
    How to get the measurement? Any reference to take?
    Why not you read the entire thread before asking questions.

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    Didn't catch the calculation, my bad,mate.

    "But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. Now if you know what you're worth then go out and get what you're worth."

     

     
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    where to get 'C' spanner? All use same tool?


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    Yeah, where to get a C spanner? The shop where I changed my suspension to a YSS one didn't give me anything.

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    How about bike with only rear adjustable shock? Does it make sense to adjust the rear only?
    bike is a machine without soul, rider would inject new life and character to this machine

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    Definetely Bro. If U 're heavy then better reset. Like wen U sit on the Bike & the Spring Compress alot, confirm wen cornering Bike will b damn wobbly, so U will nid 2 Tighten the Spring/s. But alwayz remember 2 jack up the Rear 1st making the Suspension "free" then only U cn go to tighten the Spring/s w/o damaging the Thread. Its Best wen the Compression is juz slightly wen U sit on the Bike from Stationary. Prefrence differ fr ppl.

    C Spanner cn b bought fr any Tools Shop, nearby LAB gt a few. But If no haf then can also knock the End Screws Slowly & Carefully using a long Rod / Shaft Loosen the one further fr away Springs 1st then tightened the ones closest 2 the Spring/s making the Spring/s Tighter, after Done then only tightened the one U loosen earlier. Woola Done.....
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  36. #36
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    Hi guys. I want to ask ah, lets say after the forks are serviced and they are very hard after that. Is this normal?
    [2005 Yamaha YBR 125]


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    Quote Originally Posted by crazydj View Post
    Hi guys. I want to ask ah, lets say after the forks are serviced and they are very hard after that. Is this normal?
    these feelings are very subjective, and different types of bikes, track bike, to dirtbike have specific suspension requirements. Some forks are gas filled. So if you tell us what bike is that, the right answer will be more forthcoming.

    if before servicing your forks felt like pogo stick ie, no dampening, then after servicing, filled with the proper oil, then the fork will definitely feel firm as it has regained it's dampening property.

    Check with the mechanic, if they have done anything to the preload as that would have a direct impact on the firmness. The worst thing can ever happen is that the fork was not assembled properly.

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    I ride a YBR125. My mech says the forks stiffness cannot be adjusted. He said its because the oil is new.

    Before, like what you said, it was like a pogo stick. Very bouncy, very soft. I cannot feel bumps on the road. But now, after the forks have been serviced, the forks are super hard and stiff. Last time i can push my forks down almost all the way with just my body weight, now it only goes like 1/4 to halfway.

    Is this normal?
    [2005 Yamaha YBR 125]


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    Quote Originally Posted by crazydj View Post
    I ride a YBR125. My mech says the forks stiffness cannot be adjusted. He said its because the oil is new.
    The weight of the oil will also determine firmness. But you use the word stiff and I use firm, so I am not even sure if we are talking about the same thing

    Quote Originally Posted by crazydj View Post
    Before, like what you said, it was like a pogo stick. Very bouncy, very soft. I cannot feel bumps on the road. But now, after the forks have been serviced, the forks are super hard and stiff. Last time i can push my forks down almost all the way with just my body weight, now it only goes like 1/4 to halfway.
    To able able to push the fork right down with just your body weight is definitely not right unless you weigh like Sheik Haikel. I am sure your fork had bottom out when riding fast over speed humps.

    However, it should not feel super hard for a bike like the YB125.


    Quote Originally Posted by crazydj View Post
    Is this normal?
    I wouldn't know whether that is normal or not, it is best you test it with another YB125.

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    I weigh 98kg. The front forks can go almost all the way down before i had it serviced. Now the forks are hard. Like when i go over speed bumps, i feel the bump. Hard. Or any other bump. When i jam my front brakes, the rear wheel will rise up. In the past, i could never do that.

    Normal bro?
    [2005 Yamaha YBR 125]


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    Quote Originally Posted by crazydj View Post
    I weigh 98kg. The front forks can go almost all the way down before i had it serviced. Now the forks are hard. Like when i go over speed bumps, i feel the bump. Hard. Or any other bump. When i jam my front brakes, the rear wheel will rise up. In the past, i could never do that.

    Normal bro?
    Even on the most plush dirt bike fork suspension, you can still endo if you ride fast enough.

    There is no way we can comment on the state of your fork over the forum. Check with your friends if they are knowledgeable about bikes, otherwise, bring your bike to another bike shop for a second opinion.

     

     
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    Alright thanks Demon!
    [2005 Yamaha YBR 125]


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    For riders who might want the "bling" look and adjust preload on the fly.

    http://www.singaporebikes.com/forums...ng-Enthusiasts

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    erm.. i think u r nt lookin at the right thing... preload is adjust wif 'c' clamp.. normally comes wif yr bikes took kit... u jus look for a 'c' shaped clamp/spanner tool.. den preload is jus a funny dunno wat u call thing.. jus abt yr spring...

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    When i serviced my forks in December last year, they were hard. Now in September, they are very soft. Its like when i sit on my bike, the thing goes more than 75% down. I think YBR front forks are very soft by default. Besides putting in heavier oil and losing weight, is there any other way to stiffen the front forks like you can the rear suspension which are those spring type?
    [2005 Yamaha YBR 125]


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    Thanks for the helpful tips! Will try this one out for sure..

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    Hi all...im riding spec3 juz wanna know how adjust ohlins suspension to soft....

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