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[Info] All About Touring


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http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/Touring01_resize.jpg

 

Riding As A Team

 

Guide for Team Riding

 

Here are some guide lines to safe & enjoyable ride as a team

on tour used by Team Hornet.

Hope it will be helpful to those going on tour.

 

Spectrum

 

1. Be Courteous

 

Bike should be in Good Condition

(If u service your bike... do it a week before the ride.

Any problem surfacing... bike would be in Spore)

Get to know the rest of the team.

Smile & say Hi!

 

2. Be On time

 

Won't be nice to let your team wait too long for u.

(Msg me if u gonna be late the time u be reaching or unable to come)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/Staggered01M_resize.jpg

3. Staggered Formation

 

Staggered Formation on One Lane & Singe File on Small roads

Staggered Formation will give us space for emer manoeuver.

And space on the side if bike has a problem.

 

Speed: Will ride at a speed that will overtake most of the traffic at a slow rate.

As such, we would be on the overtaking lane along the highway a fair bit.

Signal and Move Left if a Faster vehicle is coming from the behind

Flash the one infront to do likewise.

 

2nd Link: 110kmh (ever present speed traps)

 

4. Over Take on the Right

 

There will be rare times when traffic is slow and we overtake on the left.

Or when vehicle road hog (We are not gonna follow him all the way to KL)

Overtake slowly...

May use breakdown lane... in a crawling jam... look out for debris.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/Overtaking02M_resize.jpg

5. When Overtaking

 

Do So when it is safe.

Do not be pressured to overtake.

We will wait for u.

On the other hand... overtake quickly when the opportunity arise.

Until u do... the rest behind can't.

Pass and and move forward.

Make sure there's enough room for others to fall behind u.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/BikesonTour3.jpg

6. Know the Ride Plan

 

Know the route, km to run & rest point.

Will help to find the team if separated.

It will also be more interesting for u.

 

7. Hand Signals

 

Point to the tank if u need fuel.

To your head if u need rest...

Wave to the last bike to continue if u just

wanna stop for Some non-emer stuff eg wearing sunglasses...

Quickly catch up after that.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/BikesonTour5.jpg

8. Markers

 

On Quiet Country Roads...

 

The Leader may break formation & open up the pace.

Because of the time required for overtaking...

U may lose sight of the front bikers...

Don't Worry.

Keep to your safe pace... enjoy the roads.

Leader Will leave markers for u.

Important! Don't bunch up!

Keep a wider safety distance between bikes..

 

Approaching a Junction

 

If there are no markers GO STRAIGHT!

 

Anyone riding behind the leader automatically becomes a marker

When Pointed to a location to mark...

Park a safe spot.

Signal lite on the direction of turn.

Watch out for stones that usually gather around junctions.

Wait for the last bike to pass...

Then move back to the front.

Team: please let the marker thru.

 

9. Last Bike

 

He will be last to make sure no one is left behind.

 

When Formation Riding is in Order:

(Highways or Designated Trunk Roads)

It is important not to hold the team by riding too slowly.

If u see the gap for the bike in front is getting bigger...

U are too slow! catch up.

 

The Formation should be tight enough to be safe

And not let any other vehicle get in between.

They are a source of danger when the infiltrate our formation.

That includes bikes not from our team.

It is also courteous not to cut in but to maintain position.

 

10. Lost

 

If u are lost... Msg/call me. Don't Worry.

Will give u direction to return to the team.

May not get me immediately as I be riding.

But will return your call at regroup pt.

(please Pm me your Hp & a Next of Kin if u have not done it)

 

11. Choose a Buddy

 

Buddy someone...

It is the quickest way to know if u are missing or need help.

It is important for each to be responsible in his style of riding.

Safe rides is a culture with this team and

We look after each other at all levels.

Biking has it's risk... we like to keep it at a Minimum.

 

12. Bike Type

 

For day trip: Phantom 150, SP... or likes

For longer trip: Hornet 250, S4... or likes

It will be too stressful for smaller bikes.

Both the rider & team. Thks.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/ResizeofDaineseM.jpg

13. Wear Protection

 

Riding Jacket, jeans/touring pants & Shoes (boots will be gd)

Gloves.

Last line of defence to injury if we do fall.

Full face will help protect your chin/face.

 

I Know it is a little hot... but once on the move.

It is comfortable.

 

Always have your rain suit with u.

 

14. One Lane Please

 

Stay in two lines within one lane.

The Lead will decide the lane to use.

Be it left or overtaking lane.

 

Help the Lead Bike in accounting for all the bikes.

When he looks back...

He should see 2 lines of bikes with the last bike in the center.

Especially so at traffic junctions when in formation.

 

Do not overtake the Leader unless there prior arangement to do so.

 

15. In Bigger Towns:

 

Keep in close formation.

Two clear line such that the lead bike be able to see the last bike.

Especially at Traffic lights.

The essential here is not to lose anyone!

 

16. See Children... Wave

 

We are guest of their country. We must always remember that.

Be Respectful to properties & people we come in contact with.

Somehow with our riding gears... we do look intimidating.

But a wave to the kids always brings a smile.

:smile:

Riding thru towns: reduce your speed

 

The Team will do it's best to keep everyone safe.

That means you too will have an important part to play.

For yourself & your team mates.

So let take good care of one another!

 

There is no Glory if u Crash

The Ride will be delay & plans may have to change.

Injury to your body & damage to your beautiful bike.

 

Enjoy Your Ride but come home Safe

 

Important!

 

As riding has it's risk.

Joining our rides will mean you accept responsible for your own safety.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/logo/Signature23.jpg

 

Home of the Hornets

Street Smart

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THINGS TO BRING on TOUR

 

Essential

 

1. Passport (white card)

2. Money (Ringgit $1.30 entrance to 2nd link)

3. Cash Card (60cents for spore side)

4. Driving Licence

5. Bike reg & insurance cert.

6. Handphone (Auto roam)

7. Spare Key!

8. Photo copy (2)

Front side - Insurance cert, Backside - Log Card & Passport

(one copy in your bike seat & other with your passport)

- in the event of need to ship your bike back

 

Mics

 

1. Sunglasses & Spare Specs

2. Rain Gear

3. Camera

4. Maps

5. Rag to clean visor with drizzle

6. Plastic bags to Waterproof doc & electronics

 

Support Equipment

 

1. Tire repair kit & Pump (1 team member will be assign to bring)

2. First Aid Kit

3. Clutch Cable($17), bulbs & sparkplugs

4. Torch light

5. Locking devices

 

TOUR THAILAND

(Notes courtesy of Simon Soh - adapted for our own riding)

 

A. Border Documentation Requirements

For Pax

- Same procedure for entering & leaving JB from Singapore for Singaporeans at both Mlysn check point & returning from Thailand.

- All are required to complete Thais arrival white card & endorsed together with a minimum token sum of RM1/pax or Baht equivalent to the custom officer, same fee for departure.

- Passport MUST be valid at least 6 months before expiry date.

 

For vehicle at Sadao, Thailand.

- 1 copy of vehicle registration card (log-card from owner.)

Non-owners, you are to provide an authorized letter from owner with

1) both parties particulars &

2) clearly indicating you are authorized to use

his/her vehicle in Thailand during your stay.

* Upon vehicle import chit endorsed, PLEASE safe keep it & return it to Thai custom before leaving Thailand, else there will be a penalty fine imposed to your for next visit with the same vehicle

 

Important!

Photostat:

Front - Insurance Cert.

Back - have your log card & passport

 

3 Copies:

One In your bike seat sealed with zip-lock plastic bag

One with your passport

& One for me. Thks.

 

B. Please Take Note.

1. Vehicle(compulsory - NTUC Covers up to 85km from border,

Hty is within coverage eg. no need for vehicle 3rd party insurance,

other Ins co. please purchase 3rd party ins.(Compulsory)/

Personal Insurance(optional)

** Personal travel insurance is strongly encouraged before trip (optional, to be done locally) OR can contact 2_wheeler for advise (about $28 for 5 days trip)

Personal travel insurance

** Compulsory 3rd party coverage insurance to be purchased at border (minimum 10days for 140B-price might change), can also purchase at Gurun R&R Caltex station.

 

2. Bike Requirement-

Well maintained, general maintenance must be done

(including replacement of brake/clutch fluids) &

replace pump kit if u felt abnormal depressing,

major wear/tear component replaced with at least 6months shelf life.

- Chain/sprocket in good condition, well lubricated & properly adjusted.

Bring sufficient supply of chain lube to last for the whole journey.

- All moving components should be well lubricated especially clutch cable,

bring a spare cable(optional).

- Alternator properly charing with good condition battery & healthy rectifier.

- Tire & brake pad must be averagely new (60% good condition).

- DO NOT overload bike.

 

3. Documentation

> 1 Thai white card & 2 x Malaysia white card.

> 1 x copy vehicle log card & 1 x copy of passport/ I.C.

> NOK contact number(will be taken on move-out-nite).

 

4. Personal equipment check list

- Bike lock.

- Own general tools.

- Tire repair kit*, spare tire valve* & foot pump*

- Spare chain clip & chain lubrication.

- 1 x spare clutch cable (for clutch using wire type).

- 1 x spare rectifier (if with active faulty history).

- Walkie Talkie with spare battery(if any).

(organizer will bring)

 

5. Riding attire

- Individual dressing or comfortable attire with minimum exposure.

Jeans & riding jacket encouraged(no so flapping type).

- Proper footwear(prefered boots, army also can)

 

6. Safety

- In the event of break contact, DO NOT exit NSHW unneccessary(unless at planned R&R points), remain at your position safely(away from traffic flow), contact me (Let phone ring for a while... then msg me. I will stop to read msg)

- Do not stop unneccessary for misc activities along NSHW, a quick one IF you need to fresh up from drowsiness(let the last bike know eg signal with hand wiping face), if u r at rest parking area make sure we can see you.

- Consume food & beverages wisely,

practise water safety to drink from canned or bottled drinks.

 

Video on What can Go Wrong If U are Not Alert in a Convoy...

Your friends & U can get badly injured if u are not alert...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/logo/Signature23.jpg

 

Home of the Hornets

Street Smart

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Also the need to pay the Thailand Immigration Bureau RM$2 or THB$20 when they stamp your passport at the Sadao border crossing.

 

Steps to do a proper KNNBCCB with middle finger.

 

1. Bow down slightly, looking intensely at objective

2. Like a raging bull, hop and jog slowly towards objective

3. Take your left palm and slap it hard on the right mid-arm with a SLAP!

4. With charisma, raise right arm, whilst showing middle finger (with left palm trapped in bend right arm)

5. Shout! KNNBCCB

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  • 5 weeks later...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/Touring01_resize.jpg

 

Riding As A Team

 

Guide for Team Riding

 

Here are some guide lines to safe & enjoyable ride as a team

on tour used by Team Hornet.

Hope it will be helpful to those going on tour.

 

Spectrum

 

1. Be Courteous

 

Bike should be in Good Condition

(If u service your bike... do it a week before the ride.

Any problem surfacing... bike would be in Spore)

Get to know the rest of the team.

Smile & say Hi!

 

2. Be On time

 

Won't be nice to let your team wait too long for u.

(Msg me if u gonna be late the time u be reaching or unable to come)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/Staggered01M_resize.jpg

3. Staggered Formation

 

Staggered Formation on One Lane & Singe File on Small roads

Staggered Formation will give us space for emer manoeuver.

And space on the side if bike has a problem.

 

Speed: Will ride at a speed that will overtake most of the traffic at a slow rate.

As such, we would be on the overtaking lane along the highway a fair bit.

Signal and Move Left if a Faster vehicle is coming from the behind

Flash the one infront to do likewise.

 

2nd Link: 110kmh (ever present speed traps)

 

4. Over Take on the Right

 

There will be rare times when traffic is slow and we overtake on the left.

Or when vehicle road hog (We are not gonna follow him all the way to KL)

Overtake slowly...

May use breakdown lane... in a crawling jam... look out for debris.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/Overtaking02M_resize.jpg

5. When Overtaking

 

Do So when it is safe.

Do not be pressured to overtake.

We will wait for u.

On the other hand... overtake quickly when the opportunity arise.

Until u do... the rest behind can't.

Pass and and move forward.

Make sure there's enough room for others to fall behind u.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/BikesonTour3.jpg

6. Know the Ride Plan

 

Know the route, km to run & rest point.

Will help to find the team if separated.

It will also be more interesting for u.

 

7. Hand Signals

 

Point to the tank if u need fuel.

To your head if u need rest...

Wave to the last bike to continue if u just

wanna stop for Some non-emer stuff eg wearing sunglasses...

Quickly catch up after that.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/BikesonTour5.jpg

8. Markers

 

On Quiet Country Roads...

 

The Leader may break formation & open up the pace.

Because of the time required for overtaking...

U may lose sight of the front bikers...

Don't Worry.

Keep to your safe pace... enjoy the roads.

Leader Will leave markers for u.

Important! Don't bunch up!

Keep a wider safety distance between bikes..

 

Approaching a Junction

 

If there are no markers GO STRAIGHT!

 

Anyone riding behind the leader automatically becomes a marker

When Pointed to a location to mark...

Park a safe spot.

Signal lite on the direction of turn.

Watch out for stones that usually gather around junctions.

Wait for the last bike to pass...

Then move back to the front.

Team: please let the marker thru.

 

9. Last Bike

 

He will be last to make sure no one is left behind.

 

When Formation Riding is in Order:

(Highways or Designated Trunk Roads)

It is important not to hold the team by riding too slowly.

If u see the gap for the bike in front is getting bigger...

U are too slow! catch up.

 

The Formation should be tight enough to be safe

And not let any other vehicle get in between.

They are a source of danger when the infiltrate our formation.

That includes bikes not from our team.

It is also courteous not to cut in but to maintain position.

 

10. Lost

 

If u are lost... Msg/call me. Don't Worry.

Will give u direction to return to the team.

May not get me immediately as I be riding.

But will return your call at regroup pt.

(please Pm me your Hp & a Next of Kin if u have not done it)

 

11. Choose a Buddy

 

Buddy someone...

It is the quickest way to know if u are missing or need help.

It is important for each to be responsible in his style of riding.

Safe rides is a culture with this team and

We look after each other at all levels.

Biking has it's risk... we like to keep it at a Minimum.

 

12. Bike Type

 

For day trip: Phantom 150, SP... or likes

For longer trip: Hornet 250, S4... or likes

It will be too stressful for smaller bikes.

Both the rider & team. Thks.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/2100spectrum/ResizeofDaineseM.jpg

13. Wear Protection

 

Riding Jacket, jeans/touring pants & Shoes (boots will be gd)

Gloves.

Last line of defence to injury if we do fall.

Full face will help protect your chin/face.

 

I Know it is a little hot... but once on the move.

It is comfortable.

 

Always have your rain suit with u.

 

14. One Lane Please

 

Stay in two lines within one lane.

The Lead will decide the lane to use.

Be it left or overtaking lane.

 

Help the Lead Bike in accounting for all the bikes.

When he looks back...

He should see 2 lines of bikes with the last bike in the center.

Especially so at traffic junctions when in formation.

 

Do not overtake the Leader unless there prior arangement to do so.

 

15. In Bigger Towns:

 

Keep in close formation.

Two clear line such that the lead bike be able to see the last bike.

Especially at Traffic lights.

The essential here is not to lose anyone!

 

16. See Children... Wave

 

We are guest of their country. We must always remember that.

Be Respectful to properties & people we come in contact with.

Somehow with our riding gears... we do look intimidating.

But a wave to the kids always brings a smile.

:smile:

Riding thru towns: reduce your speed

 

The Team will do it's best to keep everyone safe.

That means you too will have an important part to play.

For yourself & your team mates.

So let take good care of one another!

 

There is no Glory if u Crash

The Ride will be delay & plans may have to change.

Injury to your body & damage to your beautiful bike.

 

Enjoy Your Ride but come home Safe

 

Important!

 

As riding has it's risk.

Joining our rides will mean you accept responsible for your own safety.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v189/Loontoot/Funny%20Pics/adminuser4mw.gif

 

<CMO> Quality IT Services for homes & businesses.

<CMO> 3M Products from U.S.A

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I hope people here practice what they preach for I have yet to meet a biker group doing the abovementioned.

 

Talk is easy but when on the road all hell break loose.

It doesn't make any difference whether a motorcyclist has the right-of-way or not, the rider is the one most likely to get hurt.

 

 

 

http://www.motorcycle-accidents.com/bike_photo/4-21-02_b.jpg

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I hope people here practice what they preach for I have yet to meet a biker group doing the above mentioned.

 

Talk is easy but when on the road all hell break loose.

 

Reading your above statement, apart from not meeting a bike group that practice this, there are also things about motorcycle touring that you've yet to experience or come across. So we learn by experiencing more.

 

Riding style be it in a group or not, are the choices of individual riders. Riders whom don't stay in convoy and whom ride at faster speed is their choice, not ' all hell break loose'.

 

Advices and techniques that is shared here can only do so much, it's still our own responsibility to keep us out of danger.

 

If you got a better way to do it, why not share it with us here? You could also join some of Spectrum's ride someday.

video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-594683847743189197

 

 

 

 

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  • 5 months later...

1DTO: Trunk Road Trivia

All trunk roads in malaysia is dangerous, but there are tactics to conquer them. Just like the highway, there are do's and don't's for the trunk road. I'm starting a section for the trunk road for informative purposes. By any means any orthodox or unorthodox ways are to be viewed upon as general and not personal. This also prepares our riders for up-coming trips to ensure their safety and knowledge of risk.

All contributions are welcomed. Contributers are advice to be realistic and responsible on the contributions. Constructive criticism are also welcome, directing questions to contributor would be preferred. But criticism directed to individuals by flaming will not be tolerated.

Riders have to realise that all contributions are subjected to one's judgement and experience, and 1DTO disclaims any mishap, injuries or death arising from the rider's action without proper on-the-field guidance from experienced professionals.

1) Overtaking on the double-white line:

 

Can, double-white lines occurs in bends and slopes. The idea of overtaking in up-slope is to get away from the overtaking madness from other cars in a chain when going down-slope. But precise decision has to be made with calculations on of the over-taking with conditions of the road, bike, acceleration speed, distance of acceleration.

 

Double-white line on bends advices the road users against over-taking due to limitations of view blocked by the front vehicle. Can also be done by peering through the windscreen of the front car, edging out to have a clearer view, or looking far-sightedly to the next bend to predict wat's coming past you in the next few seconds. Again calculations to be done.

 

In all calcultions I would like to add that the judgement for stopping your bike, pulling back to the chain due to mis-calculations or sudden over-taking from the front vehicle, or even bailing out of the over-taking process and pin-point your escape space in the chain has to be included in the whole action, as to ensure against mishap.

 

Convoy over-taking, which requires both safety for yourself and safety for your fellow riders, are more challenging. Lead bike has to ensure the most of the group can go through the over-taking process before embarking the action. Anyone and everyone has to automatic take up the leadership role once there is a breakage or gap. Each bike has to be reminded that following the speed and style of the front bike is hazardous for u might not even know the rider well, less his bike. Over-taking your fellow riders also applies to the same rules, doesn't mean that he knows you well, he will not bang into you.

 

Let the ball start rolling...

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn242/Gr8Whit3/Sign1.jpg

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1DTO: Highway Trivia

 

All Highways in malaysia are just as dangerous, but there are tactics to conquer them. Just like the trunk roads, there are do's and don't's for the highway. I'm starting a section for the highway for informative purposes. By any means any orthodox or unorthodox ways are to be viewed upon as general and not personal. This also prepares our riders for up-coming trips to ensure their safety and knowledge of risk.

 

All contributions are welcomed. Contributers are advice to be realistic and responsible on the contributions. Constructive criticism are also welcome, directing questions to contributor would be preferred. But criticism directed to individuals by flaming will not be tolerated.

 

Riders have to realise that all contributions are subjected to one's judgement and experience, and 1DTO disclaims any mishap, injuries or death arising from the rider's action without proper on-the-field guidance from experienced professionals.

 

1) Convoy Riding:

 

We have experienced a surge in group riding and as an amatuer, I personally find that convoy riding is suited for all kinds of group, fast or slow speed. I'll be listing some suggested do's and dont's for these section as to share and upgrade ourselves in group riding. Contributions are welcomed.

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Procrastination

 

Watching for obstacles during riding is something a lot of us overlook as bikers. During the travel, procrastination usually save our lifes.

 

Junctions' the number source of accidents.

 

Number 2 are the "Looked stationary but doesn't stay stationary" objects, cars and pedestrians some of these examples.

 

Next comes the driver/riders who doesn't check mirror, let alone check blind spot, lane changers.

 

The list goes on...

 

The above videos gives a very good narative on how a rider should think when riding thru a street, congested or not.

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn242/Gr8Whit3/Sign1.jpg

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SPEED DEMON COMING, KEEP LEFT

 

The above is something we've seen or even done before. Official legal limit for M'sia HW for example is 110km/h. But do we also realise the fact that the Unoffical legal limit is 400km/h there also? Legality = Your Wallet weight.

 

We are sometimes spoilt by understanding (or LL) drivers or riders when we hog in SG, so it's not much of an issue when we stay on the right lane with the speed limit. The kena hogged vehicle just flash and horn until we know wat's happening. But Drivers in M'sia are more "right of way" minded and doesn't mind giving u a scratch or knock when you hog... the police comes late, and NOBODY would be a witness anyway.. And with vehicles going at high speed, they would be behind you 2 seconds when u have last checked your rear mirror. By the time u looked back 3mins time their impatience level would have gone way up.. next would be road rage for some of them.

 

So, keep left unless overtaking, keep left after overtaking. Ride safe guys.

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn242/Gr8Whit3/Sign1.jpg

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1DTO: Trunk Road Trivia

All trunk roads in malaysia is dangerous, but there are tactics to conquer them. Just like the highway, there are do's and don't's for the trunk road. I'm starting a section for the trunk road for informative purposes. By any means any orthodox or unorthodox ways are to be viewed upon as general and not personal. This also prepares our riders for up-coming trips to ensure their safety and knowledge of risk.

All contributions are welcomed. Contributers are advice to be realistic and responsible on the contributions. Constructive criticism are also welcome, directing questions to contributor would be preferred. But criticism directed to individuals by flaming will not be tolerated.

Riders have to realise that all contributions are subjected to one's judgement and experience, and 1DTO disclaims any mishap, injuries or death arising from the rider's action without proper on-the-field guidance from experienced professionals.

1) Overtaking on the double-white line:

 

Can, double-white lines occurs in bends and slopes. The idea of overtaking in up-slope is to get away from the overtaking madness from other cars in a chain when going down-slope. But precise decision has to be made with calculations on of the over-taking with conditions of the road, bike, acceleration speed, distance of acceleration.

 

Double-white line on bends advices the road users against over-taking due to limitations of view blocked by the front vehicle. Can also be done by peering through the windscreen of the front car, edging out to have a clearer view, or looking far-sightedly to the next bend to predict wat's coming past you in the next few seconds. Again calculations to be done.

 

In all calcultions I would like to add that the judgement for stopping your bike, pulling back to the chain due to mis-calculations or sudden over-taking from the front vehicle, or even bailing out of the over-taking process and pin-point your escape space in the chain has to be included in the whole action, as to ensure against mishap.

 

Convoy over-taking, which requires both safety for yourself and safety for your fellow riders, are more challenging. Lead bike has to ensure the most of the group can go through the over-taking process before embarking the action. Anyone and everyone has to automatic take up the leadership role once there is a breakage or gap. Each bike has to be reminded that following the speed and style of the front bike is hazardous for u might not even know the rider well, less his bike. Over-taking your fellow riders also applies to the same rules, doesn't mean that he knows you well, he will not bang into you.

 

Let the ball start rolling...

 

Hi Gr8white,

 

It is great that you took the liberty to add this section. I would like to add somethings if you dont mind with regards to convoy riding.

 

Some things to note on Convoy Riding...imho...

 

a. Slow and in-experienced riders in the convoy to stay in front. Preferably just behind the lead marshall.

 

b. Always keep to the speed limits so as not to widen the gap in between bikes and also varying experiences and different levels of fatigue.

 

c. Never overtake unless you have too or situations forces you too. It is very dangerous to slot yourself into a gap in the convoy. It causes a chain reaction towards the back and at different reaction and fatigue levels in the group, it may cause an accident.

 

d. If slottting yourself into a gap, be it overtaking (only if absolutely necessary) or whatever reason, signal your intention to the bike next to you and tell him you are coming infront of him. Do not do this quickly and give the whole group time to slow down collectively then you slot yourself into the gap.

 

e. If you see debris or danger up ahead, point to it and everyone should also point so that people behind you know and will be cautious when they approach it.

 

f. never ride slower than the last sweeper.

 

g. always ride in staggered formation. ie: never have a bike side by side next to you.

 

h. If you are running out of gas...notify the marshalls or riders next to you by pointing at your tank. This should be done during the pre-ride brief. The message would then be passed up to the lead marshall by having all riders pointing to their tanks. If you are the only one, then the sweeper would accompany you to fill and another road marshall shall be the new sweeper.

 

i. likewise if you need to go for a pee. you point to your privates.

 

j. all riders in the convoy should be in proper riding gear. those not in proper gear should not be allowed in the convoy.

 

k. riders who speed off ahead of the convoy coz they feel it is too slow, should not be allowed to join back the convoy and should just meet at the final destination.

 

l. when convoy is broken up by traffic lights, turns, cars etc... the lead marshall is to ride slightly slowler until the rest of the convoy catches up. or wait by the road side.

 

m. If a car must cut into the convoy lane due to the need to change lanes...open up and let the car in but do so with care. if it is dangerous, then do not open up and let the car change lanes after the sweeper/last bike.

 

n. Be patient. Not everyone is expereinced. Not everyone has a fast and nimble bike. Not everyone has tons of energy. If you are inpatient, then dont join the convoy.

 

o. The convoy's aim is to RIDE SAFELY TOGETHER.

 

Just my 2 cents.

Cheers

Most experts aren't...and research is the difference between speculation and investment.

 

1430...ã™ãã€æ¥ã‚‹ã“ã¨ã€‚ :thumb:

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Would like to thank chris for sharing these valuable lessons that some of us are not fortunate to learn. Hope u can also throw some light in the other Highway Trivia Thread.

 

Feel free to contribute more. I have seen too many avoidable accidents already, so guys, keep it coming. Save and protect our fellow riders.

 

Hope that this thread can be a good lesson for our new comrade, and a reminder for our old ones.

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Quoted & Edited

 

Tips for Group Riding

Riding in groups can be more difficult than riding on your own, because you have to be aware of what other members of the group are likely to do at all times. You are likely, at times, to be riding closer to people than you would normally, and it is important that you do not do something unexpected and cause problems to other members of the group.

 

These tips are given to help you enjoy your rides with the club and to ensure that we all ride to the same pattern and with increased safety. Please accept them in the spirit they are intended, not as a criticism.

 

Always ride on dipped headlights

In built up areas and places with speed limits, ride in staggered formation and close up. This means that we don't take up as much road space and are less likely to become separated at junctions and traffic lights. By riding staggered it is easier for you to see in front of you and gives you an extra margin of safety than if you are following line astern. This is also the best way to ride in large groups on the motorway, (remember the two second rule)

On the open road you can obviously position for bends, but don't forget to watch out for the person behind you, try and keep the bike behind in sight all the time. (He may have come off or got lost!)

We operate the "drop off " system on ride outs. We are always going straight on at road junctions and roundabouts, following the same road number, even if it turns right or left (ie A59) If we turn off onto another road (ie onto B6265 or any other road off the A59) the leader may point to the junction to indicate to the second man that he should stop at the junction to show the way for the rest of the convoy. When the person acting as rear marker is in sight, the rider at the junction can rejoin the convoy in front of the rear marker.

If the leader hasn't dropped someone off at a junction and you cant see the rider behind you, WAIT at the junction, point the way and rejoin the convoy in front of the rear marker.

The advantage of this system, apart from keeping everyone together is that your position in the convoy changes the more the system is used. Therefore you are not always riding at the front, (generally the slowest position where those new to convoy riding should be) or you are not always at the back of the convoy, playing catch up all the time and generally having to ride faster in order to keep up.

Remember when following someone, don't just look at their back wheel, it can be hypnotic. Look past the person in front of you and use your observations of what is going on as if you were riding on your own.

 

 

 

Ride the Plan

Ideally, you know and trust the people you ride with. However, there has to be a first time for any riding companion. A pre-ride discussion of your plans, preferences, and requirements helps everyone avoid surprises. Talk about a pace, signals, details like fuel stops and routes, and make sure everyone gets to offer something. If you ride with a club, it may have a fairly detailed set of rules for group rides, with procedures for a variety of situations.

 

On the road, use those signals liberally and be sure that other riders are aware of your intentions so that no one is caught by surprise, which can lead to a collision like the one described above.

 

The group's leader should signal early and slow gradually. Ideally he knows the route intimately and has a plan to get everyone safely along it without disrupting other traffic. But if it is his first time there, he may get surprised too and have to make a quick decision such as whether to turn abruptly or miss the turn and try to find a way to get everyone turned around safely on down the road.

 

It's always good to have an experienced rider at the back of the group to ride sweep and attend to those who have problems. He should have a cellphone to call for help.

 

That's Why they Call Him Scary Harry

 

 

 

If you aren't comfortable with the riders you end up riding with, give yourself plenty of margin until you discover your companions' habits. On one new model group ride, one rider consistently slowed and made lane changes into riders on his right. He didn't turn his head far enough to really see his blind spot and I think his glasses blocked his view. His loud pipes also drowned out the sounds of bikes near him. It wasn't long before this guy had a large buffer zone around him. He compounded the problem by getting upset and denying it when someone tried to point out the problem. He ended up riding -- and eating -- by himself.

 

If you aren't comfortable with what others in the group do, drop out before it causes trouble. A common problem is a speed differential. Slower riders often feel uncomfortable trying to maintain the pace of faster folks. They shouldn't try to. If the other riders complain that you are slowing them down, tell them to go ahead. You don't need the risk or the tickets. Problems can also arise when some group members have "a couple of beers" at a lunch stop or if they behave recklessly in other ways. Tell them to go ahead or go ahead yourself. Or take a side trip.

 

If you have an exhaust system that you think saves lives, other riders will probably be pleased if you deploy it at the back of the group, even if it means a loss of protection. Sidecars and trikes are also best at the back of the group or in a group of their own.

 

Keep It Together

When traveling with friends, you may be mutually dependent. For example, you might have one first-aid kit, one tire-repair kit, one set of good tools, and one cellular phone (to call for aid), each packed on a different bike. In this situation you probably want to stay together. The most certain way to do this is to make each rider responsible for the one behind him or her. If you don't see the rider behind you for a few minutes, signal the rider ahead if possible, then slow down or pull over and wait for the rider(s) behind you. If everyone in the group does this, you can avoid that 100 miles of back-tracking at night in the rain. However, it's still possible to get separated, such as when a rider who has fallen behind turns a different way than those ahead. To help your group get together again, use these three systems:

 

1. Give everyone an emergency phone number in writing to call (perhaps someone's answering machine which everyone knows the code for) or everyone's cell phone numbers. If you have just a single number, Murphy's Sixth Law of Communication says that phone's battery will be dead when the lost boys try to call it.

 

2. Agree on the next stop every time you all pause for gas, grub or sightseeing. Be precise, "the first gas station on the west side of town," for example.

 

3. Make sure everyone knows the evening's destination, preferably in writing.

 

Formation Flying

The basic group riding formation is familiar to most riders. The lead rider rides to the left of the lane, with the second rider to the right and a few lengths back. The third rider is a similar distance behind the second, and so on. This staggered formation leaves room for each bike to swerve to the side and provides reaction time to brake. But you can't change speed and the side of the lane at the same time. Riding side by side limits escape routes when a threat arises. When overtaking and passing traffic, the second rider follows the first, and the third hangs back to let the second pull in to the left to make the pass.

 

When roads get twisty or narrow, you should open up into a single-file formation. When you come to a stop at an intersection, tighten up into a two-abreast configuration at the stop. If you all stay in a single lane at intersections with two or more lanes each way, it gives the traffic behind you a chance to pass. While it is tempting to block an intersection so your entire group can go through, it is against the law. So is going leaving in large bunches at a time from a four-way stop. More than two (you can each say you thought the other was waiting) is also a request for citation.

 

One common problem I see with large groups is a failure to provide gaps for other traffic. On a two-lane road, it may be impossible for overtaking traffic to safely pass a line of a dozen or more motorcycles. Some members of the group may get run off the road if a driver tries to pass and has to pull back into the right lane when oncoming traffic appears. On a multi-lane road like an interstate, a long double column of motorcycles may trap a car on one side of it, blocking it from reaching an exit. Some riders act as if permitting a car to cross their column of bikes is a violation of their religious and constitutional rights, and can make a driver already in a panic about missing his exit quite dangerous.

 

Do address this problem. It's best to ride in sub-groups of four to six bikes and provide a gap of four or more car lengths between each sub-group. These groups can also be responsible for each other, taking care of other members of their group so that the entire fleet of bikes doesn't end up trying to squeeze onto the shoulder, which can create a real hazard.

 

If the group is stopping, make sure that everyone gets completely off the road. If you are arriving at a destination with a large group, bikes at the front should keep moving to allow room for the one behind to pull off the road.

 

Stupid Passing Tricks

Motorcyclists riding in large groups consistently do a bad job of passing slower traffic on two-lane roads, which can create a dangerous situation. Typically they cut back in too close to the car they just passed and immediately slow down. This not only annoys the driver, it leaves little room for the next rider coming up behind. He or she has to wedge in even closer to the front of the car being passed. I have seen riders get locked out of the lane because those ahead left no space for them to pass. When passing a car on a road with only one lane going each direction, keep your speed up after you have completed the pass, and don't slow back down until there is a gap large enough for all the riders behind you to pull back in and safely decelerate. Stay aware of what the riders behind you are doing. If you are farther back in the group, don't begin your pass until there is a gap ahead of the car for you and the other riders in your sub-group.

 

Finally, though it isn't a safety consideration, there is an art to fuel stops, providing you are all willing to use one pump (Use more if it is a very large group or you use different grades of fuel) and figure out who owes what later. If one or more riders get out of line and man the nozzles, the rest can simply march through. The first riders through then get the pumpers' bikes and roll them through. This system takes about a third of the time required when each rider has to get off his or her bike and pick up the nozzle and maybe a sixth of that required if each rider pays independently. Nobody rides a motorcycle to spend time in gas stations. (If you want a record, someone can write down the total cost after every bike is filled.) Riders at the back of the line can go the restroom immediately (asking someone to push their bikes through), and riders at the front can go later after their bikes and the pump handler's are fueled and moved out of the way.

 

The social aspect of group riding has much to recommend it. You have someone to share your experiences and anticipation. There is also security in numbers when the unexpected happens. Pay attention to new riding companions; you may learn something. Working through initial adjustments to each other is worth it, because when you find someone you enjoy riding with, you have usually found a special friendship too.

Edited by sino74

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" People are like Motorcycles ; Each is customized a bit differently " c",)

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** Compulsory 3rd party coverage insurance to be purchased at border (minimum 10days for 140B-price might change), can also purchase at Gurun R&R Caltex station.

 

regarding the thai 3rd party temporary insurance to be purchased at the border, i was told it covers ONLY 3rd party humans and livestock, i.e. the 3rd party's vehicle is not covered.

 

* could someone kindly advise on what that insurance covers and does not cover?

* is there temporary comprehensive insurance available?

suppose we ride or drive up to bangkok (beyond the 85km coverage by our Sg comprehensive or 2nd party insurance), the rider would be very exposed even with the thai 3rd party temporary insurance:

... rider covered by his own PA policy (provided motorcycling not excluded) and travel insurance (with motorcycle loading)

... 3rd party human and livestock covered

... own vehicle not covered cos outside the 85km boundary

... 3rd party vehicle not covered at all, pay from own pocket

 

like that must make sure passengers buy travel insurance and sign indemnity form, else suay suay accident they claim driver then he siow liow :faint:

 

thank you thank you

Edited by scoobydoo

~

Current Ride: FJS400 Silver Wing

Trips:

23~27 Dec 2014: 5D5N KL & Ipoh

Scooby's blog http://scoobydooby-doo.blogspot.sg/

Tech Corner http://www.singaporebikes.com/forums/showthread.php/325894-lt-Info-gt-Silverwing-400cc-600cc-Tech-Corner

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