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Better than relying on your tapping the brakes, which might not happen in an emergency. Of course ABS sometimes have a temper, activating at the wrong time and place.

 

i trust myself more than ABS.

 

different situations calls for different reactions.

 

human intervention is always faster and more reliable, this said, has to come with road experiences.

 

however with ABS in the way, you might not be able to avoid a fall which is totally avoidable.

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Stock is good...Choose your weapon wisely and enjoy it...you can have all the $$$$ to mod and in the end you can't make full use of it....
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Let make clear :Skid not equal to slide.

Skid happens when tyre's Grip is gone...slippery road, bad tyre, out balance due to wrong riding posture+ too fast.

SO to prevent it, let get rid of the above points: SLow on wet/oil/slippery road, Good tyre and correct ride style! Skid never occurs on straight line.

 

Fish tailing happens when rear tyre have more power then the front one, or should say the rear tyre want to overtake the front one on the same bike, and it can occurs during straight line riding ,this won't couse fall unless you are dancing on your bike, just not to be panic and slow down.

 

Slide is a professional act, like sheelie.....only those not so professional will fall.....:)

FJR 1300...

以德æœäºº...

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i trust myself more than ABS.

 

different situations calls for different reactions.

 

human intervention is always faster and more reliable, this said, has to come with road experiences.

 

however with ABS in the way, you might not be able to avoid a fall which is totally avoidable.

 

Modern ABS systems can beat humans all the time. Many bike magazines have tested with professional test or race riders, with and without ABS, and even top riders stop in a shorter distance with ABS. Needless to say ordinary riders like us will benefit from ABS. In the past, yes, ABS was unreliable, sometimes too little braking, but right now there is no doubt that ABS beats even the most skilful riders.

 

Here are some videos.

 

Super 4 ABS vs non ABS -

 

Complete MCN CBR1000RR ABS vs non ABS, using ordinary rider, magazine test rider, and professional racer. -

 

Stopping distance from 80 mph (about 130 kmh)

Amateur rider: non ABS 92m ABS 75m

MCN test rider: non ABS 66m (nearly skid) ABS 61m

Professional racer: non ABS 59m ABS 42m

 

This is just one example, there are many tests that conclusively prove ABS' superiority. Not to say we must all ride ABS, I myself riding non ABS bike, but definitely for my next bike I will look out for ABS if I can afford it.

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1) what SSDC: stupid school for driving carelessly teach u is wrong: they teach u to jam e brake bla bla bla ...

 

u should use engine brake especially during rain ...

 

1)change to super good tyres & brakes ...

2)clean your disc so that it is free from oil & dirt

3)don't ride onto paint

4) put your left feet down to act as extra balance

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1) what SSDC: stupid school for driving carelessly teach u is wrong: they teach u to jam e brake bla bla bla ...

 

u should use engine brake especially during rain ...

 

1)change to super good tyres & brakes ...

2)clean your disc so that it is free from oil & dirt

3)don't ride onto paint

4) put your left feet down to act as extra balance

 

which part of ebrake they fail ?

Life sux..Take control ..and live it and pick yourselves up now.. die later

if the roads end ....i go off road

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"Bikers Don't bleed, we mark our territory"...

"Bikers Don't leave our body behind , we just a smear on the road"

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"Bikers Don't stop Riding,We keep cruzing after we Die"

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1) what SSDC: stupid school for driving carelessly teach u is wrong: they teach u to jam e brake bla bla bla ...

 

u should use engine brake especially during rain ...

 

1)change to super good tyres & brakes ...

2)clean your disc so that it is free from oil & dirt

3)don't ride onto paint

4) put your left feet down to act as extra balance

 

I don't wish to flame but IMO, putting your foot down while under heavy braking unsettles the bike. Do what the driving centre teaches, grip tank and look ahead. You don't see motogp riders put their foot down after a straight into an hairpin, do you?

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1) what SSDC: stupid school for driving carelessly teach u is wrong: they teach u to jam e brake bla bla bla ...

 

u should use engine brake especially during rain ...

 

1)change to super good tyres & brakes ...

2)clean your disc so that it is free from oil & dirt

3)don't ride onto paint

4) put your left feet down to act as extra balance

 

Bet you keep your right leg hanging after moving off.

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Modern ABS systems can beat humans all the time. Many bike magazines have tested with professional test or race riders, with and without ABS, and even top riders stop in a shorter distance with ABS. Needless to say ordinary riders like us will benefit from ABS. In the past, yes, ABS was unreliable, sometimes too little braking, but right now there is no doubt that ABS beats even the most skilful riders.

 

Here are some videos.

 

Super 4 ABS vs non ABS -

 

Complete MCN CBR1000RR ABS vs non ABS, using ordinary rider, magazine test rider, and professional racer. -

 

Stopping distance from 80 mph (about 130 kmh)

Amateur rider: non ABS 92m ABS 75m

MCN test rider: non ABS 66m (nearly skid) ABS 61m

Professional racer: non ABS 59m ABS 42m

 

This is just one example, there are many tests that conclusively prove ABS' superiority. Not to say we must all ride ABS, I myself riding non ABS bike, but definitely for my next bike I will look out for ABS if I can afford it.

 

clear track vs road with traffic, i rest my case.

 

oh, did the test incorporate dropping of gears + engine braking or just the brakes ALONE?

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Stock is good...Choose your weapon wisely and enjoy it...you can have all the $$$$ to mod and in the end you can't make full use of it....
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I felt we should be more forgiving towards the ABS technology. While some might find ABS is not useful for them as they find their riding skill is far more superior than the rest, I feel it will somehow benefit others who might ultilise its benefit. Afterall technology are susposed to be invented for the good and safety of the riders. Don't you think?

 

Back to the TS question, I would say it takes a rider's instinct to prevent it. You just have to moderate the rear brake. But fret not if you can't master it. Not all of us are really that good either. I can say most knows how to speed better than braking. Usually I will just use the front brakes, thats all.

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engine brake ?

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Ride Defensively; always.

 

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Kawasaki KIPS -> 2010 ~ 2014

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Hi, guys. It's a bonus that with abs the braking distance maybe shorten, I said maybe. The real benefit of abs is that u are still able to steer without the wheels locked up putting us at the mercy of inertia pull. ^^

 

True and this is used widely in car ABS advertising. ABS can indeed shorten stopping distance helpfully in scenarios like this:

 

1) Rider approaching Toa Payoh Central junction thinking he can make the turn in front of McDonalds before the green arrow goes out

 

2) Green arrow flashes for 2 seconds then stops (wtf!?)

 

3) Rider brakes

 

4) Suay suay it was raining and there's always a puddle of deep water before the turn itself due to road wear

 

5) Panic brake on a Phantom or other less forgiving cruiser/classic bike, instant wheel lockup

 

It takes a lot of self discipline in that scenario to realise that if you have locked up the front wheel and rear wheel braking will just make things worse, then rider needs to do 'manual traction control' and release the brakes momentarily to let the tyres grip, then apply steadily increasing braking pressure again.

 

Because this 60-0 stop must be done in under 2 seconds before the bike and rider swoops into the junction, most riders will just cross fingers and let the wheel be locked. Unfortunately we are not driving on ice/snow and a locked wheel means the machine simply will not slow down probably resulting in the inevitable skid / crash situation.

 

However ABS by preventing wheel lockup in the first place, will ensure braking force is always optimal and the bike will stop in the same or better distance than a car would (during a road test, a 2009 BMW 650cc ABS can brake as well as or better than a 2000 Honda Accord V6). The ABS system can modulate the braking force up to 50 times a second, whereas with 'manual traction control' like in my personal experience above, you only got one chance to get it right in those two hair raising seconds.

 

 

Video credits - @Metal_Heart for sharing with BSMR forums

 

Regardless of rider skill, it's prudent then to identify hazardous road conditions, slow down beforehand, and prevent the accident situation in the first place. Most bikes on the market don't have ABS or advanced traction control unless you can afford the latest 2A or class 2 bike.

 

The riders at risk on the road today are commuters and 2B riders who have to make do with 'fighter pilot' instincts and be totally aware of vehicle dynamics and road conditions. In this case knowing how ABS works and how it highlights the danger of wheel lockup... may be a very useful survival tip on the road for both newbies and lao jiaos alike. It's never too old to learn new stuff on two wheels.

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Slow & steady is always good advise. Not just speed discipline, but smooth throttle control as well. Driving smoothly gives better control and prevents loss of traction in any condition, especially important when hurrying in the wet.

 

Thankfully most Singaporean riders & drivers are excessively cautious in the rain, which is a good thing. However, watch out for sudden panic stops for seemingly no reason. Don't get impatient, overtake smoothly :)

 

The majority of bike ownership incidents involve dropping the bike at low speeds, ironically.

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I felt we should be more forgiving towards the ABS technology. While some might find ABS is not useful for them as they find their riding skill is far more superior than the rest, I feel it will somehow benefit others who might ultilise its benefit. Afterall technology are susposed to be invented for the good and safety of the riders. Don't you think?

 

 

 

+1

 

Technological driver/rider aids should be welcomed, not shunned. We should embrace it.

If you already think you're good without ABS or even TC, then you'll be even better with them

 

Don't adopt a backwards puritanical stance abt tech overshadowing your leet "skills" or "driving/riding experience". It's like a fighter pilot harping on abt the good old days of propeller planes. Technology moves on. He'll get left behind or shot down.

 

Not many years from now, all our bikes will come w TC and ABS as standard. Looking forward to it.

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+1

 

Technological driver/rider aids should be welcomed, not shunned. We should embrace it.

If you already think you're good without ABS or even TC, then you'll be even better with them

 

Don't adopt a backwards puritanical stance abt tech overshadowing your leet "skills" or "driving/riding experience". It's like a fighter pilot harping on abt the good old days of propeller planes. Technology moves on. He'll get left behind or shot down.

 

Not many years from now, all our bikes will come w TC and ABS as standard. Looking forward to it.

 

Well said. +1

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+1

 

Technological driver/rider aids should be welcomed, not shunned. We should embrace it.

If you already think you're good without ABS or even TC, then you'll be even better with them

 

Don't adopt a backwards puritanical stance abt tech overshadowing your leet "skills" or "driving/riding experience". It's like a fighter pilot harping on abt the good old days of propeller planes. Technology moves on. He'll get left behind or shot down.

 

Not many years from now, all our bikes will come w TC and ABS as standard. Looking forward to it.

 

Well said. +1

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Yep, connecting the engine to the drive wheel somehow makes it have more rotational inertia, giving less tendency for the wheel to lock. Just be careful if your bike is a 4 stroke because some (choppers especially) have very strong engine braking. Which is as good as using the rear brake. Engine braking can cause loss of control in the wet too if applied wrongly.

 

Best defense is to smooth out one's driving line to such a point that every maneuver is made as gently as possible so as not to upset the bike's balance and maximise traction over bad road surfaces. This is taught in Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist Vol. 2 DVD.

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+1

 

Technological driver/rider aids should be welcomed, not shunned. We should embrace it.

If you already think you're good without ABS or even TC, then you'll be even better with them

 

Don't adopt a backwards puritanical stance abt tech overshadowing your leet "skills" or "driving/riding experience". It's like a fighter pilot harping on abt the good old days of propeller planes. Technology moves on. He'll get left behind or shot down.

 

Not many years from now, all our bikes will come w TC and ABS as standard. Looking forward to it.

 

ABS vs non ABS, the difference is obvious :D

 

 

abs comparison.jpg

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Yep, connecting the engine to the drive wheel somehow makes it have more rotational inertia, giving less tendency for the wheel to lock. Just be careful if your bike is a 4 stroke because some (choppers especially) have very strong engine braking. Which is as good as using the rear brake. Engine braking can cause loss of control in the wet too if applied wrongly.

 

Best defense is to smooth out one's driving line to such a point that every maneuver is made as gently as possible so as not to upset the bike's balance and maximise traction over bad road surfaces. This is taught in Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist Vol. 2 DVD.

 

blip.......

--- A twist of the wrist ---

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