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  • 2 weeks later...
Tried it (raining almost day and night now).

 

Blipping works - and proper rev matching is totally different from the 'show off' kind. It's gradual, precise, and easy to learn.

 

hello, read about engine braking on two stroke..2t is only injected when throttle is twisted and gas is also released into carb..some says it's harmful some says it's okay..what are you views on it?

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hello, read about engine braking on two stroke..2t is only injected when throttle is twisted and gas is also released into carb..some says it's harmful some says it's okay..what are you views on it?

 

A two stroke offers little 'engine' braking, rather if you drop gears to slow down on a two stroker, it's the mechanical drag that slows you down (gearbox drag etc). Engine braking requires compression, by definition but this is very hotly debated.

 

For me the principle of engine compression braking is driving a 4x4 offroad. Going down a muddy slope you do not brake or you will lock the wheels and lose control. Instead, change to first gear and let go of the pedals, the engine compression slows down the vehicle by itself.

 

As for whether two stroke 'mechanical' braking is harmful, nope not to my knowledge. But theres no real reason to try and engine brake on a stroker.

 

 

For me personally I first rode on two strokes for most of my riding life so when I got a four stroke I tuned it in such a way there is no engine braking :)

 

Sent from my hong kong gangsta phone using Tapatalk

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personally, how i seek to prevent a skid is to always maintain contact with the brake lever and paddle.

in the event of any surprises occuring, at least i will not seize up and grab/depress the brakes suddenly, thus, reducing the chance of locking up the wheels. alternatively, just go slow and maintain a safe following distance.

The only reason why I'm not laughing with you is that I prefer laughing at you.

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My front wheel skid before, its even worse in another way. when front wheel skid, its like a ghost sitting on your fuel tank, and swing your handle bar left right left right all the way with brute strength normal human cannot overcome, that one even worse, luckily i was at multi storey carpark at 30km/hr only, got people wash car and the floor was wet with soap water. i noticed it and use only front brake(quite alot) to slow down as i was moving quite fast for multi storey carpark when i was going down the slope then right turn. i managed to stop smoothly. everything happened in a second.

17 Nov 2011 - April 2013, NSR150 SP

12 June 2013 - 23 Jan 2015, CBR400RRR

23 February 2015 - 29 February 2016, YZF R6 2006

12 March 2016 - 12 May 2017, CBR1000RR05

July 2017 - Jan 2019, YZF R1 2008/CBF150

 

Aug 2019 - Current SYM Joyride 200

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My front wheel skid before, its even worse in another way. when front wheel skid, its like a ghost sitting on your fuel tank, and swing your handle bar left right left right all the way with brute strength normal human cannot overcome, that one even worse, luckily i was at multi storey carpark at 30km/hr only, got people wash car and the floor was wet with soap water. i noticed it and use only front brake(quite alot) to slow down as i was moving quite fast for multi storey carpark when i was going down the slope then right turn. i managed to stop smoothly. everything happened in a second.

 

 

That's not a skid. And there's no ghost on your tank.

 

That's a tankslapper.

 

Also, you're lucky. Usually tank slapper = buang.

And after you buang, you'll feel like Sadako just gave you head.

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My front wheel skid before, its even worse in another way. when front wheel skid, its like a ghost sitting on your fuel tank, and swing your handle bar left right left right all the way with brute strength normal human cannot overcome, that one even worse, luckily i was at multi storey carpark at 30km/hr only, got people wash car and the floor was wet with soap water. i noticed it and use only front brake(quite alot) to slow down as i was moving quite fast for multi storey carpark when i was going down the slope then right turn. i managed to stop smoothly. everything happened in a second.

 

That one is tankslapper, not skid. Most front wheel skids end up in you buang-ing you bike. All my 2 front wheel skids, all ended up in me buang-ing my bike the same way. Front wheel skidded, handlebar turned left, i fell forward on my right side. Both happened when raining.

[2005 Yamaha YBR 125]

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

To prevent skidding, whatever the circumstance (I don't know which part of the scenario the question is on), we MUST read the road situation, people condition, driver and pedestrian behaviours ALL AT THE SAME TIME. When the situation gets suspicious, use STAGED bra kin. How???: Practice, Practice, Practice till second nature. Got time, go out and practice. waiting for BF, GF, husband or wife, in a clear open carpark, go to the top and practice. What's STAGED BRAKING? check it out here: http://www.webbikeworld.com/Motorcycle-Safety/braking-tips.htm

 

Hope this helps!

Why rush? It's the journey, not the destination ... :shades:

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Yamaha Virago XV1100 '92

Honda Pacific Coast '98

Yamaha V-Max '93

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@whitepomfret , thanks for sharing that resource.

 

MegaRider.com (which your article links to) also has a lot of interesting free content such as accident avoidance, observation skills and a lot of other useful strategies such as spotting and avoiding 'road rage prone' drivers by anticipation.

 

I wonder if you have perused the content of the site because MegaRider has a lot of potentially useful ebooks to purchase... but the price is pretty steep. There are a lot of free online content out there that cover similar subjects from what I've seen so far.

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@whitepomfret , thanks for sharing that resource.

 

MegaRider.com (which your article links to) also has a lot of interesting free content such as accident avoidance, observation skills and a lot of other useful strategies such as spotting and avoiding 'road rage prone' drivers by anticipation.

 

I wonder if you have perused the content of the site because MegaRider has a lot of potentially useful ebooks to purchase... but the price is pretty steep. There are a lot of free online content out there that cover similar subjects from what I've seen so far.

 

Hi Pandora's Kitten :3;7440181,

There is a lot on the web that's is free online resource, You're right. Megarider NZ's contribution to webbikeworld is useful for those of us who don't want to pay.

 

I must say that we can read as much as we want and go out to practice. But sometimes, and at points, it's always good to have a coach. I had the priviledge of advanced motorcycling training under Advanced Motorcycling Australia. We pay. Classroom physics, racetrack practical. no showing off stuff, just serious learning all you can. It ain't cheap but boy did the initial investment reap benefits after that and up till now. Less spills, more anticipation, less stupidity too... which is one point megarider raised: the rider's control of him/herself.

 

The Australian lesson was backed by the insurance association's encouragement for riders to be better trained - 20% off premiums. that's substantial but because the riders are not sharper, it costs the companies less to insure these guys.

 

Makes a whole load of sense to bring advanced riding techniques here to Singapore. We haven't got it yet. i hope we will.

 

Cheers!

Why rush? It's the journey, not the destination ... :shades:

Moto Guzzi Breva v1100ie '07

Yamaha Virago XV1100 '92

Honda Pacific Coast '98

Yamaha V-Max '93

BMW K100 '83

Kawasaki GpZ900 Ninja '89

Honda CB 750 FII '97

BMW R100G/S Paris Dakar Classic '95

Honda CB 250 RS '88

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  • 2 weeks later...

technically the only way to prevent is not to ride it.

 

predicting the road condition and getting better tyre, etc, only reduce ur chances of getting a skid. self experience and knowing how to react to avoid falling further reduce getting serious injury.

Accident can happen anytime, anywhere.

However ask yourself, do you want to fall at 120km/h or 60km/h?

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  • 1 month later...
ABS nt exactly safer. you still will go down.

 

I rode a bike with ABS , n beg to differ with ur opinion... Had never skid my ride b4 no matter how hard i applied both brakes (i dun call it "jam" brake coz my tires nvr jammed b4 hehe) .. Riding bike with ABS, juz slammed hard on it if u require to slow down immediately... Do not release e lever until u know ur safe from e obstacle ahead of u.. Common mistakes that riders did is to apply intermittent braking ( for wat u wanna do dat for when ur bike have ABS ?? ) ...

"Shut Up n Ride"

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  • 1 month later...

Having ABS n TC are some of the safety devices good to have but after riding for more than 20 years i just can't change my mindset. I don't think I can jam the the brakes in emergency or squeeze in the throtle in corner harder than I thimk is safe.

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u do that in a car...Just have to apply relevant knowledge/skills to different machines. eg. Bikes with TC & ABS and bikes w/o. There is always a reason why ABS and TC are invented in the first place. This is progression to a more safe environment rather than regressing.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

If we remember the 3 step braking:

 

1) COVER your brakes: fingers over the levers - get ready (time saved)

2) SET-UP the brakes: Pads/shoes are engaged slightly (physics shifts the weight of the bike forward so that more traction is on the front wheel)

3) SQUEEZE PROGRESSIVELY: brakes bite, enables the weight shift forward, tires plough into the ground and bike stops.

 

This is text book. But the real world, like Pandora's Kitten mentioned in the earlier example last year is like turning and skidding. Nevertheless, if we keep this 3 step braking principle and make it second nature, ABS or no ABS, we can stop the bike better.

 

In fact, I've seen a race track demonstration of ABS vs non-ABS by a highly trained motorcyclist. ABS has a longer stopping distance for him. Although for a standard rider, ABS will do better. But what this means is that if we train and practice, we can equal what technology compensates for the lack of skill. A good and promising point to note.

 

Another slightly off tangent point is the set up of bikes today: the Rear brake levers are on the same side as the Front. (Older Nortons and BSAs are diagonally opposite - Clutch on the right, Rear brakes on the left). What this means is the brain and leg & hand muscles are unable to independently control different pressure on the rear from the front so easily. (if opposite, the brain can control separately better.) Reason for needing this is that a lower amount of brake pressure must be applied to prevent rear wheel lock-up. Too bad the technology has changed. There's nothing we can do about it now.

 

So road and situation reading with calm collected mind are critical skill and psychological aspects to this. Got time, go practice, practice, practice. a 15 min session every fortnight or every month helps.

Edited by whitepomfret

Why rush? It's the journey, not the destination ... :shades:

Moto Guzzi Breva v1100ie '07

Yamaha Virago XV1100 '92

Honda Pacific Coast '98

Yamaha V-Max '93

BMW K100 '83

Kawasaki GpZ900 Ninja '89

Honda CB 750 FII '97

BMW R100G/S Paris Dakar Classic '95

Honda CB 250 RS '88

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  • 5 months later...

For me, i will continue to tap my brakes frequently (Front and rear) while riding. This can create heat on both front and rear brake disc and brake pads. This will caused them to be more dry, which is easier for braking during your journey. However, do not tap hard suddenly. You will skip for sure.

If there are better methods, please kindly tell me. Thanks!

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  • 3 months later...
For me, i will continue to tap my brakes frequently (Front and rear) while riding. This can create heat on both front and rear brake disc and brake pads. This will caused them to be more dry, which is easier for braking during your journey. However, do not tap hard suddenly. You will skip for sure.

If there are better methods, please kindly tell me. Thanks!

 

wow. never heard of this technique till now

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  • 2 weeks later...

For not so experienced rider, ABS is the best option. U only need to brake hard n ABS will do the job for u.

My Ride History:

1997 - 2003 : Yamaha SRE 100 a.k.a My First Love

2001 - 2004 : Yamaha Sports Y110SS a.k.a My First 2-Stroke Bike

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2012 - 2012 : Honda CB400 Spec II a.k.a My First VTEC Love

2013 - NOW : Yamaha YZF-R1 a.k.a My First SuperBike :cool:

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