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Body posture when cornering


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Need some advice on body posture. I've looked at tons of tutorial videos on body positions. What I currently do now is:

 

1. Half butt-cheek out

2. Inner knee out

3. Toes on pegs

4. Heels against heelguard

5. Outer arm resting on tank

6. Head looking through the corner, past the windshield, infront of the mirror

 

There must be something I am doing wrong here I think, cos my whole butt bounces off the seat when I hit a bump. This results in me having to use my arms to grip tighter and in turn, affects throttle control.

 

Any expert advice here will be appreciated. Thanks. :)

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I'm no pro here. But one thing I learnt, use your inner thigh to hold you in to the tank, and also to pull you back to your straight position. You can rest your outer arm on tank that's fine, but keep the inner elbow loose, then just take the weight off your hands/steering except that enough for your steering. :)

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put yr weight on yr foot pegs, butt jus touchin seat nt restin on seat. on a left corner, anchor yrself wit yr right thigh, most of the weight on the pegs, something like squating instead of restin yr butt on the seat. relax yr arms

 

Thanks for the tip, will try it next time. :)

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put yr weight on yr foot pegs, butt jus touchin seat nt restin on seat. on a left corner, anchor yrself wit yr right thigh, most of the weight on the pegs, something like squating instead of restin yr butt on the seat. relax yr arms

 

Thanks for the tip, will try it next time. :)

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I'm no pro here. But one thing I learnt, use your inner thigh to hold you in to the tank, and also to pull you back to your straight position. You can rest your outer arm on tank that's fine, but keep the inner elbow loose, then just take the weight off your hands/steering except that enough for your steering. :)

 

I am pretty loose on the handlebars, but bumps tend to transfer to my lower body and causes me to lift off the seat, unsettling the bike for a bit..

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I'm no pro here. But one thing I learnt, use your inner thigh to hold you in to the tank, and also to pull you back to your straight position. You can rest your outer arm on tank that's fine, but keep the inner elbow loose, then just take the weight off your hands/steering except that enough for your steering. :)

 

I am pretty loose on the handlebars, but bumps tend to transfer to my lower body and causes me to lift off the seat, unsettling the bike for a bit..

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Yes its important to set your rider sag for front and rear suspension. If it is already done imho you need to increase rear rebound as I suspect that when you hit a bump mid corner the rear spring compresses then extend. Too little rebound and the rear spring will extend too fast causing you to jump off the seat.

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Yes its important to set your rider sag for front and rear suspension. If it is already done imho you need to increase rear rebound as I suspect that when you hit a bump mid corner the rear spring compresses then extend. Too little rebound and the rear spring will extend too fast causing you to jump off the seat.

 

Thanks! This was very valuable advice!

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...when I hit a bump. This results in me having to use my arms to grip tighter and in turn, affects throttle control.

 

Don't do that. Loosen up your grip on both sides of the handlebars.

One valuable advice that I've learned was to let the bike soak up the bumps and carve the corner for you (so long as you turn it in properly: not too little to allow oversteer, not too much to veer inside the corner)

 

There's a reason why, but I'll try to keep my post simple for the time being.

 

Cheers and happy tracking.

- rB

Co-Moderator for IT -inerary forum

Biker nerd • Windows • Apple Mac • Android user

 

"Kick up your sidestand bro, let's ride..."

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haha ya lah. dont f me. can remove my name btw?

 

so u hit the track already??

 

Haha, removed liao. Eh you got lobang for alphinestar or dainese suit? I'm looking to get a new full set, including gloves, boots and back protector. Regina like not very friendly to let me see see -_-

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Don't do that. Loosen up your grip on both sides of the handlebars.

One valuable advice that I've learned was to let the bike soak up the bumps and carve the corner for you (so long as you turn it in properly: not too little to allow oversteer, not too much to veer inside the corner)

 

There's a reason why, but I'll try to keep my post simple for the time being.

 

Cheers and happy tracking.

- rB

 

Yup, I don't ride with a tight grip but when I hit a bump mid corner, my bum actually lifts off the seat, halfway in midair! If i don't hold on to my handlebars, I will fly off haha. Think I'm gonna go setup my suspension. See how it goes. :)

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Haha, removed liao. Eh you got lobang for alphinestar or dainese suit? I'm looking to get a new full set, including gloves, boots and back protector. Regina like not very friendly to let me see see -_-

 

i have a friend who always managed to get good price at regina... maybe can go together to see see look look? :lol:

肥仔七åƒå·

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Most people (me included) think that hard riding means the suspension must be set hard. IMHO I have learnt over time that this is not actually correct.

 

When at mid corner... the suspension is already loaded.. the spring is compressed.. and then you hit a bump.. the spring wants to absorb some more but the compression setting is too hard and refuses to allow the oil to flow within the chambers of the suspension and instead transmits the upward force like a dead stick.. and kicks you out of your seat.

 

Spring preload setting is just to suit the rider's weight and determines the resting position and travel range of the rear shock.

 

Damping and rebound adjustments determine the quality of the ride.. whether its plush or hard.

 

I personally prefer a plush set up to allow the suspension to work in its entire travel range.

 

IMHO... its best you set rear spring sag first... leaving the damping and rebound to the mid range. Ride the bike... and from there work on the damping and rebound to suit your style of riding.

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  • 2 years later...
Lifting up an old thread.

 

What is the rider sag used in PG? thanks

 

Every bike is different. It is like asking what is the best looking shirt to wear to a date. You need to read your bike's manual, set the correct setting (possibly change your springs), and then keep riding and tweaking.

 

But of course, there are "safe" settings, just like clothes that "can't go wrong". Set your free sag to 20-25mm and rider sag to 30-35mm for both front and rear. It won't be perfect but it won't throw you off your lines. If you are unable to achieve these numbers even if you set your preload to max or min, then it's time for a spring change.

 

For me, I managed to get the correct sag on my CBR with stock springs and a little less than factory default preload.

RXZ NSR150SP SV650 CBR400RR GSXR1000 FZ6S VFR800 CBR1000RR R1200GS

Galant ES 2.4A Civic Si 2.0A

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