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Tour Ready BMW G310GS Adv (Most affordable BMW)


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    • By SBF
      Last September BMW filed trademark applications for three new ‘M’ branded motorcycles – the M1000RR, M1300GS and M1000XR. Now the first of those machines has been unveiled and it’s aimed squarely at bringing BMW into contention for the WSB championship.

      The standard BMW S 1000 RR, which has been around since it emerged in 2009 as a Superbike World Championship contender, uses a water-cooled 999-cc inline four-cylinder engine producing 205 horsepower with a redline at 14,600 rpm and a top speed of 185 mph. A solid foundation, then. Now, the M 1000 RR (or M RR for short) makes 212 hp at 14,500 rpm and has a higher redline at 15,100 rpm thanks to a bunch of internal upgrades.
      On the list are lighter two-ring forged pistons, titanium con rods, machined intake ports and lighter, slimmer rocker arms, while a titanium exhaust system opens things up and saves nearly 7.5 pounds of weight. Beyond the engine, the M division also gave the M RR carbon fiber winglets and a unique windscreen that generate up to 35.9 pounds of downforce at 189 mph. The bike's swing-arm is lighter than the S 1000 RR, giving it a slightly longer wheelbase, and special M-specific suspension tuning takes things even further. Stopping the bike's M carbon fiber wheels are four-piston twin-disc M brakes in the front and a two-piston single disc in the rear.  We'll go into more details on the individual components later on.

      BMW says these changes have been developed for sport racings and "perfected for the road." That means this race-focused bike features daily rider comforts like heated grips, hill-start control, and ABS Pro settings for rain, road, with a dynamic mode. 
      The M1000RR is BMW’s equivalent to Ducati’s Panigale V4R – a homologation special, designed to meet FIM WSBK and Superstock rules offering increased performance and race-tuning potential compared to the normal S1000RR. It’s built around a revised version of the S1000RR’s Shiftcam inline four, now rated at 209bhp (212PS, 156kW) in road-legal form, plus race-inspired weight loss, suspension and aerodynamics to create a package that comes in at a mere 192kg ready-to-ride. In short it’s the most potent street-legal production bike BMW has ever made, and one that gives the firm the best chance yet of getting the racing success that’s eluded the firm in the decade since the S1000RR was launched.

      Let’s start with the changes to the engine. While the capacity of BMW’s Shiftcam four-cylinder is already right at the limit, and its variable valve timing and lift offers greater tuning potential than its fixed-valve-timed rivals, BMW has still found ways to improve it.
      The big changes are the adoption of new pistons – 12g lighter each – longer and lighter titanium con rods, slimmer and lighter rocker arms and a higher 13.5:1 compression ratio. Those add up to a 500rom higher redline, now 15,100rpm, five extra horsepower at 14,500rpm and greater performance than the normal version all the way from 6000rpm to the redline.

      Peak torque of 83lbft at 11,000rpm is unchanged, but the M1000RR gets a 46 tooth rear sprocket instead of the normal 45 tooth design, giving shorter overall gearing that will inevitably result in stronger acceleration.
      The engine’s intake ports are also tweaked, with new geometry to improve flow, while the titanium exhaust valves get new springs.
      The 2mm longer titanium con rods reduce lateral loads on the pistons, adding to the bike’s race tuning potential. Each rod weighs a mere 85g despite the vast forces it needs to cope with.

      Like the S1000RR, the M1000RR has variable-length intake trumpets, but they’re shorter than before to improve top-end performance. A new Akrapovic titanium exhaust system cuts a remarkable 3657g from the weight of the stock pipe, totalling just 7780g.
      In terms of outright performance, BMW claims the M1000RR reaches 62mph (100km/h) around 0.1 to 0.2 seconds faster than the S1000RR and hits 125mph 0.4s quicker. Not vital on your daily commute, but significant in the race to the first corner.
      The usual, bafflingly vast array of riding modes (rain, road, dynamic, race) are increased further with an extra three ‘Race Pro’ settings (Race Pro 1-3), while the M1000RR also gets BMW’s highest-spec IMU-assisted traction control and a wheelie control that can be finely adjusted in ‘Race Pro’ modes to tailor the precise amount of front wheel lift you’d like. Race Pro also adds three engine brake settings.

      Launch control, an up-and-down quickshifter and a pit lane speed limiter are also standard, as is a ‘Pro’ version of BMW’s hill start control with adjustable settings (although if you haven’t mastered hill starts, maybe the M1000RR isn’t for you…)
      The engine changes might be significant, but the M1000RR’s aero updates are more noticeable. Like an increasing number of its rivals, the BMW has grown wings.
      While we’ve recently seen BMW developing advanced active aerodynamics, its first production foray into the field is with conventional fixed-position winglets on either side of the nose. Designed to help keep the front of the bike down during acceleration, allowing the rider to use more throttle without wheelying, the BMW winglets are intricately-designed carbon-fibre parts that are claimed to create as much as 13.4kg of downforce at 186mph.
      The M1000RR also gets a new, taller windscreen that BMW claims reduces wind resistance and offsets the extra drag of the winglets so top speed isn’t reduced.

      BMW says that during tests with Tom Sykes and Eugene Laverty, the M1000RR was 0.5s to 0.7s per lap faster with the winglets fitted than without. Speaking of lap times, the firm says that BMW World Endurance rider Markus Reiterberger, on a stock M1000RR fitted with slicks, was just 2.101s slower than Tom Sykes and 1.590s slower than Eugene Laverty when they were riding full WSB-spec machines that were 15hp more powerful and 15kg lighter.
      While we had been hoping that BMW might have used the lessons learned on the HP4 Race to bring carbon-fibre frame technology to the M1000RR, the firm has stuck with the normal aluminium chassis. That’s probably as a result of having to meet the strict €40,000 WSBK price cap for homologated street versions of the racers – something the M1000RR does with ease, with a UK list price of £30,935. (We'll check back in with BMW Motorrad Singapore to see how much the landed cost will be, if it even arrives on our shores)
      The chassis might be familiar but the M1000RR gets new suspension geometry with a 23.6 degree head angle and 3mm less fork offset. Wheelbase grows from 1441mm to 1457mm in the process, thanks in part to a swingarm that’s 11.7mm longer than the normal version. The swingarm pivot point is also more widely adjustable than on the stock S1000RR.
      At 192kg, the bike’s weight is 5kg less than the normal S1000RR, largely accounted for by the 3.7kg lighter exhaust system. The wheels – BMW’s ‘M’ carbon rims – are also 1.7kg lighter than the normal aluminium ones.
      Other chassis tweaks include milled alloy triple clamps and revised rear suspension geometry that increases the rear ride height by 6mm. It’s all slowed down by new ‘M’ brakes developed with Nissin with lighter calipers and thicker discs than the stock S1000RR.
      While the bike’s on-board view is largely familiar the TFT dash gets customised displays for the M1000RR, and if you splash out an extra £4100 for the ‘M Competition Package’ you get an activation code that allows comprehensive data logging to be downloaded via the bike’s OBD port.

      That M Competition Package also brings the software for a GPS lap timer trigger and an array of milled alloy parts including levers and footrests, the ‘M’ carbon package and a 220g lighter swingarm as well as the firm’s newly-released M-Endurance chain, which is DLC-coated to prevent wear and eliminate the need for regular adjustment. A pillion seat cover completes the somewhat pricy set.

      Will the M1000RR be what it takes to bring BMW into contention in WSBK? The firm will certainly be hoping so. At the time of writing Sykes and Laverty are languishing in 11th and 13th places in the WSBK championship table and the firm is last of the five regular manufacturers in the constructors title race, behind Kawasaki, Ducati, Yamaha and Honda. Only Aprilia is behind BMW, and the Italian firm has only appeared in wildcard races with a single privateer bike this year.
    • By SBF
      Global Reveal of the Harley-Davidson® Pan America™ Adventure Touring Motorcycle!
      More information and news to follow!

    • By ChongAik
      🏍️ Designed to meet the demanding requirements of today's scooter market, the #DUNLOP ScootSmart tyres includes innovation normally reserved for Dunlop's full-size motorcycle tyres!
      🇸🇬 Available in most service and repair outlets in Singapore!
      💬 Send us a message for any enquiries!
      Visit Us at:
      Replacement Parts & Tyres
      📍 34/36 Desker Road, Singapore 209566
      ☎️ +65 6297 2532
      🕘 9am-6pm | Mon-Fri
      🕘 9am-5pm | Sat

    • By REDEMPTIONITE
      With a heavy heart, I am putting up my trusty bike for sale starting a family soon and I am changing to a car.
      Had no issues with the bike since I owned it. This bike is perfect for Singapore’s urban riding. Awesome fuel consumption. I am currently averaging around 28-29km/l. Bike is serviced regularly every 6 months or every 5000km whichever is earlier.
      Here are some details & accessories that comes with the bike
      1)     Single owner
      2)     Bike has never gone further than JB. Never embarked on touring trips before
      3)     COE ending on 04/2026
      4)     Low Mileage: 49140 as of 17/12/2020 (~10k/yr)
      5)     KOSO Voltmeter
      6)     Main Stand
      7)     Kajima Re-inforced Steel Crash Bar
      😎     Hepco Becker Inspired Steel Crash Bar Guard
      9)     Exhaust Sliders
      10)  Handguard
      11)  R&G Inspired Radiator Guard
      12)  “Spider” Handphone holder
      13)  New K&N Air Filter – Dec 2020
      14)  Kappa 52L Top Box + Rack
      15)  2” risers
      16)  Extra Fuel-Tank Holder Bracket (5L emergency fuel tank included)
      17)  New Pirelli Angel GT Tyres (Front & Back)
      18)  Custom Rear Wheel Mudguard (Original Mudguard will be given)
      19)  Mudguard Extension
      20)  Pair of Fog Lights with switch
      21)  Original Honda Owner’s Manual
      Looking to let go at $13,888. Negotiable.
      If the price is right, I will throw in my AGV Helmet (used) worth $300 & a NOLAN Full Face Modular Helmet (only wore it once) worth $200.
      PM me @ 90105916 for more photos or to arrange for viewing😊
      Cheers!





    • By DrRipper
      Last of the carburetted KTM Duke. Light weighted (145kg dry) and more than enough torque to keep your smile on your face. Great city ride, nimble, fast from the start and amazing carburetted thumper sound which makes it more of a character ride than the efi successors. Unaffected by NEA ban.
      Stock bike with: Brembo brakes Magura clutch WP fully adjustable suspension Marchesini wheels Steel braided lines Updated Silver engine without the issues of the earlier LC4, and with high flow heads.
      Some upgrades: FCR carburetor Brembo RCS brake master cylinder New silicone radiator hose set installed. Lithium battery with switch for IU FBN921U New oversized radiator (May 2020) Clutch master rebuilt (Sep 2020) New chain (Oct 2020) Low 3x,000km for a 15-yr-old bike.
      Registration date: 30 Dec 2004 COE expiration: 30 Apr 2024
      Asking $6,000. Priced to sell due to work.
      Best price is $6,000. If this is the bike you want, show your commitment and then we negotiate. Please pre-arrange viewing in Clementi at 81211154.
       



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