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Put up a recommended setting for bike to be used on track days.

 

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Make:

Model:

Tyre:

 

Front:

Preload:

Compression:

Rebound:

Pressure:

 

Rear:

Preload:

Compression:

Rebound:

Pressure:

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Make: Suzuki

Model: GSXR750WX (99)

Tyre: Metzeller Rennsport RS2

 

Front:

Ride Height: 5mm of fork showing

Preload: 3 rings showing

Compression: quarter turn from full

Rebound: quarter turn from full

Pressure: 32 psi

 

Rear:

Ride Height: 5mm spacer added

Preload: 15mm showing

Compression: Full

Rebound: Full

Pressure: 34 psi

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Tyre pressure also depends on your riding style. Some presure may work for some while other are more comfortable with their own. Also, Peter is of a different weight as compared to myself.

 

Lastly, there's a different if you're using Air or Nitrogen. As Nitrogen does not expand much, you can afford to pump close to your desired pressure after heating. Whereas for Air, you need to check the cold pressure vs pressure at operating temp.

 

There is no fix setup for all riders. just a base or recommendation and the tweeking is done by each after riding.

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Make: Yamaha

Model: YZF-R6 (2001)

Tyre: Metzeler Rennsport

 

Front:

Preload: 2 lines showing

Compression: 3/4 turn out from full

Rebound: 1 turn out from full in

Pressure: 31psi

Ride Height: 5mm of fork tube protruding through top yoke (Exclude fork cap)

 

Rear:

Preload: Position 7 of 9

Compression: 1/2 turn out from full in

Rebound: 8 clicks from full on

Pressure: 28

 

(Courtesy from Performance Bikes July2002)

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Make: Honda

Model: CBR 954 (2002)

Tyre: Bridgestone BT012

 

Front:

Preload: 9 full turns out (from full in)

Compression: 1 turn out on punch dot (from full in)

Rebound: 2 turn out on punch dot (from full in)

Pressure: 32psi

 

Rear:

Preload: Position 6 from minimum

Compression: 1 turn out on punch dot

Rebound: 2 turns out on ounch dots

Pressure: 36

 

(Courtesy from Performance Bikes Sept2002)

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Make: Honda

Model: CBR 900 T/V (96/97)

Tyre: Metzeler Sportec M-1

 

Front:

Preload: 1 line showing

Compression: 1/2 turn turn out from full

Rebound: 1 turn out from full

Pressure: 30 psi

 

Rear:

Preload: 6th hardest notch out of 7 stepped notches

Compression: 1/2 turn out from full

Rebound: 1/2 turn out from full

Pressure: 32

 

(Courtesy of Performance Bikes Dec 2002)

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Make: Suzuki

Model: TL1000S

Tyre: Metzeler Sportec M-1

 

Front:

Ride Height: 3mm of fork leg showing (excluding cap)

Preload: 2 lines showing

Compression: 3/4 turn turn out from full

Rebound: 1 turn out from full

Pressure: 30 psi

 

Rear:

Preload: 5mm of tread showing above locking ring

Compression: 1/2 turn out from full

Rebound: 1/2 turn out from full

Pressure: 32

 

(Courtesy of Performance Bikes Nov 2002)

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Make: Triumph

Model: Daytona 955i (99/00)

Tyre: Pirelli Super Corsa

 

Front:

Preload: 3 Lines showing

Compression: 1 1/2 turns out from full in

Rebound: 1 1/2 turns out from full in

Pressure: 31psi

 

Rear:

Preload: 6mm fo tread showing above top locking nut

Compression: 1 1/2 turns out from full in

Rebound: 1 3/4 turns out from full in

Pressure: 28psi

 

(Courtesy from Performance Bikes June 2002)

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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Although this isn't strictly a riding technique there's a lot of false information about the 'correct' set up for a bike's suspension.The one main thing that most of these articles miss is the most crucial - setting the sag correctly.

 

The sag range will be the same for everyone but some of you will find that you will need to change springs to get into that right range. Race bikes, generally, need harder setting than road bikes as they ride on smoother surfaces. Road bikes have a huge range of dips, bumps and potholes to cope with so need to set slightly softer.

 

Most of you will have different preload settings, thanks to your weight but all of you will need to be in the same range for your suspension to work at it's optimum range, namely it's middle third.

 

Without the sag set right the damping will never be able to work at it's best, as it will be trying to overcome the effects of a badly set spring. Don't forget that your pride and joy has been designed to work with a hugely varying type of rider on board. It has to cope with very heavy riders to very light riders. Aggressive riders to steady riders and all points and weights in between.

 

A compromise? Damned straight!

 

It's amazing that people will spend hundreds, even thousands of pounds on suspension components and twiddle with them all day and night but never take the time to set the sag correctly and never get the bike handling any better!

 

So what is sag? There are two types, Static and Loaded. Static sag is the amount the bike settles under it's own weight. Loaded sag is the amount the bike settles with a rider on board.

 

To check that you have the right rate of spring you will need to set both the static sag AND the loaded sag, just doing one or the other is only getting half the story.

 

Here's what you will need to check and set your sag.

A tape measure.

A pen and paper.

Tools to adjust the front and rear preload.

Three strong friends.

 

Static Sag

 

Setting the static sag is easier than the loaded but it will still need a set of strong hands to keep the bike off the floor while you take your measurements. Lift the back wheel of the bike off the floor by pulling the bike over on its side stand.

 

 

 

Now, using your tape measure, take a reading from the centre of the rear wheel spindle to a point on the tailpiece that is directly above the spindle. It will be helpful to mark that point on the tailpiece for the future reference.

 

Write down the measurement and we will call this reading A.

 

Measurement A will remain the same throughout the procedure so you only need this reading once. Now put the bike back down on it's wheels and hold it upright. You will see the bike settle under it's own weight. Measure the distance from the spindle to the tailpiece. We will call this reading B.

 

Subtract B from A. This is your rear static sag. Keep a note of it just in case you want to change it back. Ideally you are looking for 5-10mm on a race bike and 15-20mm on a road bike.

 

Either compress or loosen off the spring to get into this range. The adjuster is normally a pair of rings on top of the spring. One of them is a locking ring and the other is the adjuster. You will need a C-spanner to make the adjustment. If you don't have one then a hammer and drift will do (animal!)

 

Now lift the front of the bike off the floor using the same side stand method. Measure from the bottom yoke to the top of the stanchion. We will call this measurement C. Like measurement A this will remain the same through out.

 

Drop the bike back onto two wheels and take the reading again. We will call this D.

Subtract measurement D from C. This is your front static sag reading. Keep a note of it just in case you want to change it back. Ideally you are looking for 10-20mm on a race bike and 20-25mm on a road bike. Either compress the spring or loosen it off to get in this range. The adjuster is the bit wot pokes out the top of the forks. Use a suitable spanner or socket to adjust them.

 

Loaded Sag

 

If all is well we have managed to get with in range but this isn't the whole story. We now need to take into account your weight!

 

Sit on the bike and have one friend steady the front, one steady the back and the other ready to measure. Sit the bike upright. Now WITHOUT touching the front or rear brakes bounce up and down a few times in the seat and then assume your normal riding position. Measure the rear of the bike as before and we will call this measurement E.

 

 

 

Subtract E from A and this gives you your rear loaded sag reading. Try and get between 20-25mm on a race bike and 30-40mm on a road bike by adjusting the preload as before.

Now do the same for the front. We will call this measurement F.

 

Subtract F from C and try to obtain 25-35mm on a race bike and 35-50mm on a road bike.

If you can't get in these ranges for BOTH Static and Loaded then you will need to change the spring for a harder or softer one. Harder if you're outside the range and softer if you are inside the range.

 

:help: it's 6 in the morning and i almost freak out when i saw this... can u have a more lay man and easily understandable summary on the above???

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My mentor often tells me that most if the time, to ride fast requires technique and skill. The right settings can improve your timing by 0.75 sec per lap. But the rider's skill divides the 1minute50s from the 1minute40s. Most setup recommended are a base to start with and experiment with different setting to suit the rider. This includes posture and a whole lot of others. That's the beauty of motorcycling. There's more physics applied then a 4-wheel.

 

The last GP in Jerez, Ruben Berricello had a shock to know that GP riders are doing 320km/h on the straights with 2 credit card size contact to the road. It's high praise from a top driver about 2-whell racing.

 

When I went to theoritical, my timing got worse. The feedback to the rider is the most important and something yet to master.

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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  • 1 month later...

Make: Kawasaki

Model: ZX-636R (03)

Tyre: Michelin Pilot Sport

 

Front:

Preload: 9 Lines showing

Compression: 4 turns out from full in

Rebound: 1 1/2 turns out from full in

Ride Height: 5mm of fork protruding

Pressure: 33psi

 

Rear:

Preload: 8mm fo tread showing above top locking ring

Compression: 6 turns out from full in

Rebound: 6 turns out from full in

Pressure: 36psi

 

(Courtesy from Performance Bikes June 2003)

Wolverin

"You live only once"

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:thumb:

 

i went thru everything, i would say its excellent reading material...both on suspension set up and tires....

 

spend some time for quality reading guys...you will benefits from them

 

not a bad one huh.

hehehehee.......

thought it might be useful.

thanks for the comment....

hahahahha.....

will try it when i get my class 2 in one years time..... :pity: :pity:

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  • 3 weeks later...

 

do you know tat ya riding a very good bike, and the above mentioned set up applies to your bike as well and YES they makes hell lots of a difference....

 

drop me a line, i gladly get ya RRR set up sweetly

 

il4, can help me set up mine too?

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
Guest mercenaryrider

I think this thread is not too right. Somethings are missing

 

You have to provide details on the rider weight with full gears.

 

Not all bike set the same. They all have to depend mostly on rider weight.

 

Then you need to get the right spring rate... The wt of oil for different track... tunning the suspension is an art and only the rider can feels the different.

The basic. Race sag, static sag. This are impt area for the intial setup.

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  • 3 months later...

yeah.. that's what i thot too. I think weight, condition (road or track) and riding style matters. I don't think there's a "sure" setup for any bike. It's very much how you want it to handle.

 

I am not a pro, but it took a lot of trial and error to make it ride sweet... in fact i am still exploring ways to make it ride better :)

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