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  • SBF
    Illegal wheel modifications on smaller motorcycles are ‘accidents waiting to happen’

    A motorcycle with a long swingarm and narrow tyres spotted recently near Star Vista. ST PHOTO: ZAIHAN MOHAMED YUSOF
     
    Modifications made to motorcycle tyres and swingarms may look cool and unique but could be risky for road use.
    It is now a trend for small motorcycles below 200cc to have an extended swingarm – a part that attaches the rear wheel axle to the motorbike’s lower frame. Some even argue that a lighter, narrow rear tyre combined with a long swingarm may boost acceleration.
    But motorcycle road safety and racing experts have told The Straits Times that such changes are illegal, risky and untested for road use.
    Mr Joseph Lee from SBR Trackdays said on Monday: “These are dangerous modifications (for road use). They have become popular only in the past few years, when Malaysia started doing Thai-style drag racing.”
    Mr Lee, who organises motorcycle track days for superbikes at the Sepang International Circuit in Selangor, said he witnessed in 2022 two long swingarms break on road-going motorcycles.
    “The problem is the (long motorcycle) swingarms are made of soft aluminium,” said Mr Lee. “If a heavy pillion rider sits on the motorcycle, the swingarm may break.” Modifications made to motorcycle tyres and swingarms may look cool and unique but could be risky for road use.
    Mr Aman Aljunied, an assistant manager at the Singapore Safety Driving Centre, said that using non-standard thin tyres may be dangerous as a result of reduced traction on wet surfaces.
    “An extended swingarm is a modification of a (motorcycle) frame’s structure which may cause unstable handling in cornering and straight-line riding,” said Mr Aman. “Motorcycle manufacturers have researched and tested their motorcycles’ handling before production, therefore it is best to ride a motorcycle ‘standard’ as sold in the showroom for transportation use.”
    The narrow tyres seen on illegally modified motorcycles are slightly wider than mountain bike tyres. Like the long swingarms, narrow tyres can be bought on e-commerce platforms and through Facebook groups.
    Mr Norman Lee, owner of motorcycle workshop Race Werks Motor Sports, said such modifications will alter a motorcycle’s handling.
    “Workshops should discourage motorcycle owners from doing such modifications because other than a cosmetic upgrade, there is no long-term benefit for the rider,” said Mr Lee.
    “These are accidents waiting to happen, when the motorcycle performs poorly over bumps or crashes when going into turns.”
    The extended swingarms can be easily bought and installed at late-night motorcycle workshops in Johor Bahru. ST understands that some workshops in Singapore also provide the service.
    A motorcycle mechanic at Jalan Tebrau in Johor said he is seeing more young Singaporean customers wanting longer swingarms.
    “For under RM600 (S$185), your newly modified motorcycle with a longer swingarm can be ready in a few hours,” said the mechanic, who did not want to be named.
    A motorcycle with a pillion rider seen recently near Singapore Turf Club. The motorcycle has a long swingarm, narrow tyres and aftermarket wheels. 
    ST PHOTO: ZAIHAN MOHAMED YUSOF The Land Transport Authority (LTA) said last Friday that it takes a serious view of illegal vehicle modifications, as they could pose safety risks to drivers, riders and other road users.
    An LTA spokesman said: “Modifying the rear swingarm of a motorcycle is not allowed as it can affect the manoeuvrability and safety of the vehicle. When replacing the rims of a motorcycle, the size (width and diameter) of the installed rims must conform to the manufacturer’s recommendations.”
    The most common types of illegal modifications for motorcycles involve exhaust and lighting systems, said LTA. In 2021, LTA issued 2,740 summonses for these types of modifications, with 1,927 summonses issued in 2022.
    LTA also issued 757 summonses to motorcyclists for having improper or unsuitable tyres in 2021, including 19 for rear swingarm modifications. In 2022, 755 summonses were issued, with 39 of them for rear swingarm modifications.

    A small capacity motorcycle parked near Clarke Quay is seen with an extended swingarm probably made of soft aluminium. This picture was taken three days ago. 
    ST PHOTO: ZAIHAN MOHAMED YUSOF Some motorcycles with swingarm and tyre modifications can be spotted at Housing Board multi-storey carparks, near late-night eateries and at motorcycle workshops in Jalan Besar.
    A food delivery motorcyclist, whose motorcycle has an illegal swingarm modification, said he is currently the only one in his group with the unique swingarm.
      “I look at where I’m going and I know how to take bends safely… I do it slowly,” said the rider, who gave his name only as Jasni.
    But Jasni would also have to look out for the law as anyone who illegally modifies vehicles can be fined up to $5,000, imprisoned for up to three months, or both.
    Penalties for repeat offenders are doubled. Repeat offenders convicted in court may also have their vehicles detained for up to three months, said LTA.
    Article Credits: tnp.straitstimes.com
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    SBF
    Motorcycle convoy from Singapore caught in Johor flood

    The group wanted to brave the flood on Jalan Nitar to continue with their journey to Kuantan, Pahang.
    PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM COMMUNITY RODA JOHOR/FACEBOOK
    A convoy of high-powered motorcycles from Singapore was caught in a risky situation in Mersing, Johor when some of their motorcycles were almost swept away by the strong currents of flood waters.
    Mersing police officer Abdul Razak Abdullah Sani said the group wanted to brave the flood on Jalan Nitar to continue with their journey to Kuantan, Pahang.
    “There were six high-powered motorcycles that were on their way to Kuantan, Pahang. However, a motorcycle broke down after riding through the flood,” he said on Wednesday.
    “A group of army personnel from the Malaysian Armed Forces was patrolling the Kampung Jamari area when they saw the group and provided help.
    “There were no police reports lodged over the incident, and no injuries were reported,” he added. - THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK
     

    327367013_337375458843720_8659560456993236939_n.mp4 Video: Community Roda Johor - CRJ 
     
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    Article Credits: TNP Singapore

    SBF
    Singapore cracks down on motorcycle emissions
     

    If you’re a motorcycle commuter from Malaysia to Singapore, ensure your ride is in compliance with the island state’s rules and regulations. In a recent enforcement exercise, the Singapore National Environment Agency (NEA), the Singapore Police Force (SPF) and the Land Transport Authority (LTA) issued 66 fines to motorcyclists for various offences.
    Of the total, 25 were fined for excessive noise, four for excessive smoke emission and 24 for other misdemeanours such as improper licence plates. Additionally, 13 riders were found riding without a valid motorcycle licence and using a motor vehicle without insurance coverage, as detailed by an NEA media release.
    In the release, the three enforcement agencies stated the exercise is part of efforts to remind motorists to adhere to Singapore’s environmental and road safety regulations. All vehicles, including foreign-registered vehicles entering Singapore, must comply with safety and emission requirements.

    Beginning April 2023, Singapore will tighten emissions standards for motorcycles, including foreign-owned vehicles, registered before July 2003. Such motorcycles falling under the dateline can continue to be used till Jun 2028, provided they meet the April 2023 emissions standard.
    Enforcement will be carried out through random emissions testing for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons at land entry checkpoints to Singapore, as well as during enforcement operations. Malaysian motorists are reminded vehicles that breach the rules may face penalties and be denied entry at the land checkpoints.
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    Article Credits: www.paultan.org

    SBF
    The Why Behind Arai Helmets

    An Arai shell expert with a helmet during the production process at the factory in Japan.
    In 1914, a doctor practicing near the Brooklands racetrack in England first correlated the relationship between motorcycle accidents and serious head injuries. Dr. Eric Gardner went on to invent the first purpose-built motorcycle helmet. It wasn’t until two decades later, when a head injury resulting from a motorcycle accident took the life of Thomas Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia, that the first serious studies were conducted into the efficacy of motorcycle helmets in reducing the severity of head injuries. Hugh Cairns, Lawrence’s attending doctor and a leading neurosurgeon, used his findings and influence to ensure that helmets would become obligatory equipment for British Army Signal Corps riders going forward.
    Early helmets were mostly constructed from cork, leather, and sometimes wood, and remained so until post-war developments in synthetic materials lead innovators such as Hirotake Arai to develop an entirely new design. Arai, a keen motorcyclist, had retooled his family hat business to produce safety helmets for construction workers. Applying the same manufacturing techniques, he began making and selling the first Japanese motorcycle helmets in 1952. They were made from a fiberglass resin outer shell lined initially with cork, and later, expanded polystyrene (EPS).
    Seven decades on, motorcycle helmets, along with a multitude of international standards, have evolved exponentially, as has our understanding of science. Nonetheless, the infinite number of variables existing in a real-world crash ensure that even the most sophisticated models used to gauge a helmet’s ability to absorb an impact will remain controversial. While tests aimed at appraising shell penetration, peripheral vision, and the strength of chin straps lend themselves more readily to laboratory observation, governing bodies are forced to compromise in the face of producing practical, repeatable tests that accurately simulate impact absorption

    An Arai factory engineer utilizing an ‘anvil test’ rig on a helmet shell.
    An effective helmet design aims to minimize the energy reaching the wearer in a crash, and since much of the testing involves dropping helmets from a given height onto an anvil, passing the resulting standards can be as simple as thickening the EPS layer in all the right places. Arai argues that the resulting helmet would no longer possess the overall strength and durability afforded by a sphere and ignores the role a helmet plays in redirecting and absorbing energy. In the same way a stone can be made to skim across a pond, a round, smooth helmet will glance off a surface, redirecting energy away from the wearer.
    Arai’s design philosophy first accepts that practical limitations on a helmet’s size and weight restrict the volume of protective EPS foam it can contain. Inevitably, helmets can’t prevent all head injuries. But, with the understanding that safeguarding a rider’s head goes far beyond meeting the demands of governing bodies, Arai applies the “glancing off” philosophy to design helmets that reduce the effect of impacts on riders’ heads. Given that most impacts are likely to occur at an oblique angle because motorcyclists are moving at speed, Arai’s design aims to maximize the ability of a helmet to redirect energy by glancing off an object. The design is a function of shape, shell strength, and deformation characteristics that absorb energy along with EPS.


    Arai collects crashed helmets for analysis and data collection, and uses the information to continually refine their helmet design.
    Arai has developed and refined its approach through decades of evaluation and experimentation. Its helmets are round and smooth, and any protruding vents or airfoils are designed to detach on impact. The shell itself must be strong and flexible, but it must not deform too quickly or it will dig in rather than glance off. Arai uses multiple laminated layers combining glass and composite fiber to produce a very strong but lightweight material, and areas of potential weakness at the helmet’s edge and eyeport are reinforced with an additional belt of “super fiber.” Arai says its shells can withstand much higher abrasion than what is mandated by standards tests, and in doing so, can retain its energy absorption properties for a second or third impact.

    Every Arai helmet is still made and inspected by hand at the family-owned factory in Japan
    While glancing off can redirect energy from the impact, a high-velocity crash may also require a helmet to absorb and distribute impact energy. Arai’s proprietary one-piece, multi-density EPS liner is made up of different sections of varying densities corresponding to the adjacent shell surface. This helps maintain the helmet’s spherical form and enhances its ability to glance off. In the case of a crash involving a slide along the ground and into an object, such as a curb or barrier, Arai’s helmets are designed to deflect the initial impacts with the ground with minimal shell deformation, saving its absorption properties for the rapid deceleration caused by impacting the object.
      Many other helmet manufacturers and philosophies exist, and riders must make their own conclusions in the knowledge that certification requirements mandated by bodies such as the DOT and ECE only guarantee a minimum standard. Every Arai helmet is still made and inspected by hand at the family-owned factory in Japan; the only automated process is the laser cutting of the eyeports. Over its history Arai has built an enviable reputation for quality and attention to detail. As the saying goes, it is expensive for a reason.

    Each helmet shell undergoes a series of quality control checks before continuing through the production process.
    For more information on Arai helmets, visit araiamericas.com.
     
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    Article Credits: ridermagazine

    SBF
    Chong Aik: Lunar New Year 2023 Promotion
     
    Hop into a prosperous Lunar New Year and enjoy great deals on brand new riding gears and accessories with our LUNAR NEW YEAR 2023 PROMOTION! VALID FROM 12 JAN 2023 - 5 FEB 2023     Many more promotional deals for various brands are also available! Call us now at our showroom (+65 6294 2532/1) to find out more!   Check out our current ongoing promo deals at: https://www.chongaik.com.sg/content/9-promotions   Check us out on all our social media platforms: https://linktr.ee/chongaiksg     Visit us at: Helmets & Apparels Showroom 45 Desker Road, Singapore 209576 (+65) 6294 2532/1 9am-6pm | Mon-Fri 9am-5pm | Sat   Powerstar Motor P/L 151 Jalan Besar, Singapore 208869 (+65) 6392 5803 10:50am-7:30pm | *Tue-Sun * temporary operating hours   Join SingaporeBikes on Telegram for more of the latest news, special offers, reviews of motorcycles, and more!


    SBF
    Mah Pte Ltd: 2023 New Year Sale on VESPA & PIAGGIO MODELS
     
    Mah Pte Ltd NEW YEAR DEAL YOU WOULDN’T WANT TO MISS!!   Mah Pte Ltd is having a sale till end of January 2023!!!   What’s even better? $2023 OFF COE this New Year   Hurry Come down now and book your dream bike that you have been wanting to own!!   323008692_656200016251797_1150765531287455149_n.mp4   Mah Pte Ltd 1179 Serangoon Rd, Singapore 328232 Send us a chat during office hours, or drop our friendly salesperson a message 24/7 to know more!
     
    Amin: +65 9114 9428
    https://wa.me/6591149428
    Megan: +65 8533 3462
    https://wa.me/6585333462
    Danny: +65 8750 2254
    https://wa.me/6587502254
    Firdaus: +65 8292 4460
    https://wa.me/6582924460
     
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    SBF
    TVS Apache RR 310 has hit Singapore Roads.., Here is SBF take on it!!
     

     
    The TVS Apache RR 310 is a high-performance motorcycle that was developed by the Indian manufacturer TVS Motor Company. The Apache RR 310 is the company’s flagship model in the under the TVS brand, which also includes the Apache RTR 200 4V, Apache 2V, and Apache RTR 160 4V. TVS has a long history of producing
    reliable and affordable motorcycles, and the Apache RR 310 is no exception.
     

     
    TVS Motor Company was founded in 1979, and has since become one of the leading manufacturers of motorcycles and scooters in India. In addition to the Apache series, TVS also produces a range of other popular models, including the Jupiter, Sport, and Star City+. The company has a strong presence in the Indian market, and is also expanding its reach globally, with a presence in over 80 countries.



    Handling Characteristics:
    One of the standout features of the TVS Apache RR 310 is its exceptional handling. The motorcycle is equipped with a perimeter frame that provides excellent stability and cornering capabilities. The Apache RR 310 also comes with a suspension setup that is designed to handle the rigors of the road, including a 41mm upside-down front fork and a monoshock rear suspension.



    The Apache RR 310 is powered by a 300cc, single-cylinder, liquid-cooled engine that produces 33.5 horsepower and 27.3 Nm of torque. The engine is paired with a 6-speed transmission that provides smooth and precise shifting. The motorcycle also comes with a slipper clutch that helps to prevent wheel-hop under aggressive downshifting.

    In terms of braking, the Apache RR 310 is equipped with a 300mm disc brake up front and a 240mm disc brake at the rear. The motorcycle also comes with dual-channel ABS as standard, which helps to improve braking performance and reduce the risk of skidding.



    Outlook:
    In terms of design, the TVS Apache RR 310 has a sporty and aggressive appearance. The motorcycle features a sharp and angular design that is complemented by its full-fairing bodywork. The Apache RR 310 also comes with a set of 17-inch alloy wheels that are shod with sticky Michelin Road 5 tires as standard.
     


     
    Notable Features:
    The TVS Apache RR 310 comes with a host of notable features that enhance its performance and functionality.



    Some of the notable features of the Apache RR 310 include:
    A fully-digital instrument panel that provides a wealth of information, including speed, RPM, fuel level, and trip data. LED headlights and taillights that provide excellent visibility and a modern look. A quick-shifter that allows for seamless gear changes without using the clutch. A ride-by-wire system that helps to optimize power delivery and improve fuel efficiency. A bi-directional quickshifter that allows for seamless upshifts and downshifts.


    Riding Experience:
    The TVS Apache RR 310 is a joy to ride, with its responsive handling and smooth power delivery. The motorcycle is well-suited for a variety of riding conditions, whether you're tackling twisty backroads or cruising down the highway. The Apache RR 310 is also comfortable to ride, thanks to its upright riding position and well-padded seat.
     


    One of the standout features of the Apache RR 310 is its strong acceleration. The motorcycle's 300cc engine provides plenty of power, and the quick-shifter makes it easy to make the most of that power. The Apache RR 310 is also agile and nimble, making it well-suited for winding roads and tight turns.
    Conclusion:
    Overall, the TVS Apache RR 310 is a solid choice for riders looking for a sporty and agile motorcycle. The motorcycle's handling, performance, and features make it a great value for the price. Whether you're a seasoned rider or a beginner, the Apache RR 310 is sure to provide an enjoyable and satisfying riding experience.
     

    The TVS Apache RR 310 is now available from exclusive local distributor – Motor Sport Pte Ltd. The listed machine price is S$9,500 + COE and test-ride units are available. To find out more first-hand, head down or contact Motor Sports Pte Ltd to try the bike out first-hand!
    🏍️🏍️🏍️         Motor Sport Pte Ltd        🏍️🏍️🏍️
    Address: 3007 Ubi Rd 1, #01-446, Singapore 408701
     

    SBF
    Chong Aik: Year-End SALE Promotion
    End this year with a blast and get awesome deals on brand new riding gears and accessories from us with our YEAR-END SALE PROMOTION!
    📅 Valid from 10 DEC 2022 - 8 JAN 2023

    ❗❗ EXCLUSIVE AT OUR OUTLETS ❗❗
    ❗❗ WHILE STOCKS LAST ❗❗


     
    📞 Call us at +65 6294 2532/1 to contact our showroom for stock availability!
    🤩 Many more promotional deals for various brands are also available! Call us now at our showroom (+65 6294 2532/1) to find out more!

    🛍️ Check out our current ongoing promo deals at: https://www.chongaik.com.sg/content/9-promotions

    🌐 Check us out on all our social media platforms: https://linktr.ee/chongaiksg
    💬 Send us a message for any enquiries!

    Visit us at:
    Helmets & Apparels Showroom
    📍 45 Desker Road, Singapore 209576
    ☎️ (+65) 6294 2532/1
    🕘 9am-6pm | Mon-Fri
    🕘 9am-5pm | Sat

    Powerstar Motor P/L
    📍 151 Jalan Besar, Singapore 208869
    ☎️ (+65) 6392 5803
    🕘 10:50am-7:30pm | *Tue-Sun
    * temporary operating hours

     
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    SBF
    Mah Pte Ltd: 12-12 Sale 35% off on GIVI Products
    Save the Date - 12/12/2022
     
    For Enquiries Pls Msg us thru +65 6295 6393 or +65 9782 6997
     
    Mah Pte Ltd
    www.mah.com.sg
    Address: 1179 Serangoon Rd, Singapore 328232
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    SBF
    RACING WORLD: CHRISTMAS SALE
     
    It's the festive season! Get a FREE Taraz# Waterpoof Helmet Bag worth $49.90 and a FREE Putoline Helmet Sanitizer (500ml) worth $19.95 for every helmet purchased!   Valid from 1st December 2022 to 31st December 2022   Visit us: 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538 Monday to Saturday (10am to 7pm) Closed on Sunday & Public Holiday OR Shop online: www.singaporeracingworld.com (Note: trade in deal only available for walk-in purchase)    

     

     
     
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