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WTS | Ducati Super-bike 1098(S) c/w 10 year COE till 2029


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Ducati Super-bike 1098(S) - Last generation of dry clutch beast

THE MOST POWERFUL, LIGHTEST L-TWIN SUPER BIKE IN HISTORY

 

COE till April 2029

 

Comes with Upgraded Goodies:

- Full Ohlins specification

- Brembo RCS19

- Brembo RCS16

- Termi Racing Exhaust (Optional)

- CNC Slave pump

- DNA Air filter

- Volt Meter

- Wireless TPMS

- Wireless Remote Anti thief Alarm + Tracking

- Servo Bypassed

- Ducabike Open Clutch Cover

- Ducabike Foot rest extender

- Zero Gravity bubble windshield

- Headlight protector

- Rizoma Accessories

- Rear pillion seat cowl cover

- Carbon Fiber Front mudguard

- Carbon Fiber Air intake cover

- Carbon Fiber Rear Hugger

- Carbon Fiber Swing Arm cover

- Carbon Fiber Body side panel cover

- Carbon Fiber Side exhaust cover

- Carbon Fiber Rear tail side cover

- Carbon Fiber Upper Heat shield cover

- Carbon Fiber Heel Guard Cover

- Carbon Fiber Brake Pump cover

- Carbon Fiber Instrument Guard

- Carbon Fiber Key Cover

- Carbon Fiber Tank Cover

- Carbon Fiber Mirror Cover

- High Gloss Spray rims

- Motivation Front slider

- Torx Bolts in GR Titanium Gold

- HID Headlight

- Rear LED smoke tail light

 

Recent Service & Parts replacement with reputable workshop:

- 36k Full servicing with receipt

+ Valve Clearance with Belts & Shim

+ Coolant replacement

+ New Spark plug

+ Ohlins Front & Rear serviced

+ Replace all Fluid

+ New Galfer Front and Rear Brake Pad

+ New chain Slider + Link

+ New Rear Brembo master cylinder

+ DID 525 Chain + F/R Driven spocket with aftermarket carrier

+ Diablo Supercorsa F120/70 & R200/55

+ Recent NEW starter clutch (clutch, flange, Gear) and coolant change & EO Change

 

Underutilised as I have too many other hobbies and prefer car modifications. Am a mod enthusiastic and not a road racer.

 

Letting go @ S19,888.00 @ Watsapp +65 90618558 only

 

Note that bike is fully paid off hence no COI. Keen owner pls find your own source of loan if require.

 

Thanks for viewing my post. Cheers

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Edited by siaokao07

2018 Ducati 1098s

2018 Mercedes W205 C250

2012 Volkswagen Sicrocco

2011 Honda FD2R Type R

2008 MY07 Subaru Impressa

2007 Yamaha 06 Fazer 1000

2005 Honda RVF 400 | 2006 Suzuki K2 1000

2004 Honda CBR 150 | 2004 Honda CBR 400

2001 Honda SP 150 | 2003 REVOKED

2000 Yamaha TZR 125 | 2001 Kawaski KR 150

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      Article by CarBuyer.com.sg, kudos to Deyna Chia for the awesome writeup!
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      Mah Pte Ltd
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      Address: 1179 Serangoon Rd, Singapore 328232
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      Who is involved?

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      The final piece of the TE-1 puzzle is the UK Government’s Office for Zero-Emission Vehicles (OZEV), delivered by Innovate UK. OZEV will be helping with funding the project, as well as supporting charging point infrastructure throughout the UK – something without which no electric project can become viable in the real world.
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    • By SBF
      This is more like it. After we gave Ducati a razzing over its insistence that a paint scheme and some small spec changes constituted a new model, it has wowed us with an all-new 2021 Monster. It’s 40 pounds lighter, it’s more powerful, and its bones are substantially different than the 2020 bike.

      Ducati’s legendary naked bike showed up in 1993, a Massimo Tamburini-designed beauty with a steel trellis frame and Ducati’s infamous L-twin on full display. It was a hit, but even with a blue-chip name behind the drawing board, it was a parts-bin special. That, friends, ain’t the case here.

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      The power is sent through a new gearbox that has an up-and-down quickshifter as standard.
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      Coupled with the weight loss, the new Monster is narrow, and has a stock seat height of 32.3 inches. If you’re more compact, Ducati will sell you a seat to lower the bike to 31.5 inches, and if you’re of truly Napoleonic proportions, you can throw in a lowering spring to get the seat down to just 30.5 inches off the deck.
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      Last but not least, for 2021 Ducati is unveiling decal sets to help buyers separate their Monster from the crowd. The Monster will be available in Ducati Red and Dark Stealth with black wheels or Aviator Grey with red wheels in ’21, though price varies by color. If you want a small windshield and a pillion cover, you’ll need to upgrade to the Monster Plus, which is available in the same three hues.

      The 2021 Ducati Monster will hit dealers in April, available in 3 colours - the standard Ducati Red, Dark Stealth and Aviator Grey. There will also be a Monster Plus which comes with upgraded Ohlins and other goodies. We will confirm the pricing once we hear back from Ducati Singapore.



      2021 Ducati MonsterTechnical Specifications and Price
      Price: Engine: 937cc, liquid-cooled, Testastretta V-twin; 4 valves/cyl. Bore x Stroke: 94.0 x 67.5mm Compression Ratio: 13.3:1 Fuel Delivery: Fuel injection w/ 53mm throttle bodies; ride-by-wire Clutch: Wet, multiplate slipper and servo-assist; hydraulic Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain Frame: Aluminum Front Suspension: 43mm inverted fork, 5.1-in. travel Rear Suspension: Monoshock, adjustable for spring preload, 5.5-in. travel Front Brakes: Radial-mounted Brembo 4-piston M4.32 calipers, radial master cylinder, dual 320mm semi-floating discs w/ Cornering ABS Rear Brake: Brembo 2-piston caliper, 245mm disc w/ Cornering ABS Wheels, Front/Rear: Light alloy cast wheels; 3.5 x 17 in. / 5.5 x 17 in. Tires, Front/Rear: Pirelli Diablo Rosso III; 120/70-17 / 180/55-17 Wheelbase: 58.0 in. Rake/Trail: 24.0°/3.7 in. Seat Height: 32.3 in. Fuel Capacity: 3.7 gal. Claimed Wet Weight: 414 lb. Warranty: 2 years, unlimited mileage Available: April 2021 Contact: ducati.com


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