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  • SBF
    Racing World: Happy 2022 New Year Promotion 
    Here is a happy a reason to hit the road with more joy this new year! Racing world have launched New Year Promotion Sale with various international brands. Many trade in deals (for walk in customers) and huge discounts on the helmets, engine oils, accessories and other merchandise.

     
    Visit @Racing World: 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538, Monday to Saturday (10am to 7pm), closed on Sunday and Public Holiday

    Shop at: www.singaporeracingworld.com (Note: Trade in deal only available for walk in purchase)
    Join SingaporeBikes on Telegram for the the latest news, special offers, reviews of motorcycles, and more!


    Visit Racing World: 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538
    E-Shop: https://www.singaporeracingworld.com/
    For more promotions and deals from Racing World, do visit their vendor folder on SBF located here:
    https://www.singaporebikes.com/forum/376-racing-world-s-pte-ltd/
    Visit Racing World @ 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538, 10am to 7pm, Closed on Sunday and PH
    Or shop online @ www.singaporeracingworld.com































     
     

    SBF
    Chong Aik: Latest TRAX TZ301 Motorcycle Sunvisor Helmet
    Get geared up with the optimal protection for the road and against the glaring sun with the all-new #TRAX TZ301 - TRAX's latest lineup of PSB APPROVED motorcycle open-face helmet, ideal for daily use and provides the rider with the much-needed features such as ventilation, removable and washable top and cheek pad, and sun visor! @ChongAik
    ❗❗ NOW AVAILABLE - AVAILABLE FROM SIZE S UP TO 2XL ❗❗
    ✅ PSB APPROVED Helmet
    🛒 Purchase from us and have our products delivered right at your doorsteps at the comfort of your home! Visit and message us at www.chongaik.com.sg to order!
    🛍️ Various options available: https://www.chongaik.com.sg/311-trax-tz301

    Helmets & Apparels Showroom
    📍 45 Desker Road, Singapore 209576
    ☎️ +65 6294 2532/1
    🕘 9am-6pm | Mon-Fri
    🕘 9am-5pm | Sat
     
    Powerstar Motor P/L
    📍 151 Jalan Besar, Singapore 208869
    ☎️ +65 6392 5803
    🕘 10:50am-7:30pm | Mon-Sun
    Join SingaporeBikes on Telegram for more of the latest news, special offers, reviews of motorcycles, and more!


     

    SBF
    Racing World: New Arrival - 2022 EVO RS9 HELMET With Trade-In Promo     NEW ARRIVAL: 2022 EVO RS9 HELMET (PSB Approved) With Trade-In Promo Now   Solid NOW: $99.90 (U.P. $129.90) Trade-In and save $10: After Trade-In $89.90   Graphic NOW: $119.90 (U.P. $149.90) Trade-In and save $20: After Trade-In $99.90   Visit @Racing World: 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538, Monday to Saturday (10am to 7pm), closed on Sunday and Public Holiday

    Shop at: www.singaporeracingworld.com (Note: Trade in deal only available for walk in purchase)
    Join SingaporeBikes on Telegram for the the latest news, special offers, reviews of motorcycles, and more!


    Visit Racing World: 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538
    E-Shop: https://www.singaporeracingworld.com/
    For more promotions and deals from Racing World, do visit their vendor folder on SBF located here:
    https://www.singaporebikes.com/forum/376-racing-world-s-pte-ltd/
    Visit Racing World @ 8 Ubi Road 2 Zervex #01-14/#01-11 Singapore 408538, 10am to 7pm, Closed on Sunday and PH
    Or shop online @ www.singaporeracingworld.com



     














     
     

    SBF
    For us, one of the best aspects of the Italjet stand at this years EICMA was the stripped-down Dragster displayed on a ramp which you could move up and down and take a close look at exactly how the Dragster is designed & engineered.
    Italjet Singapore exclusive distributor: Scooter Narcotics

    109 Kaki Bukit Ave 1, Singapore 415989
    Tel: +65 9009 2371
    If you've missed our initial article on the Italjet Dragster, more details on specs, arrival in Singapore, and how you can purchase your very own piece of art:
     

    Not many manufacturers, especially scooter manufacturers, would ever dare display their bikes naked at a show, as typically, all the ugly bits or design shortcuts are hidden underneath the panels.

    When you get the chance to see the Dragster exposed like this, you realise what makes it unique and why the Dragster is in a different league than any other scooter ever made. It would seem that Massimo Tartarini, the designer of the Dragster and President of the company, has put just as much effort into designing the bits you wouldn't usually see as he did the sculptured outer panels.

    Every little detail is placed perfectly and with careful thought, even down to things like the ABS pump, wiring and fuel tank.  
    Italjet are famous for their frame design, The trellis frame on the Dragster looks impressive with or without the panels, but when stripped down, you can really appreciate its modular nature and see the various pieces that fit together to form the core on which the Dragster is built.

    One thing people need to understand about the Dragster is this is not simply a product Italjet want to release to make money, but it has real passion behind it. Italjet wants to show the world what they can do and how they refuse to conform to the normal, and the new Dragster couldn't be any further away from normal. 

    Massimo commented in a recent interview that he is not interested in creating a sensible commuter vehicle; instead, Italjet has a key focus on high-end machines that break the mould and stick the middle finger up to practicality. 

    The Dragster appeals to those who have an eye for design and appreciate engineering its fair to say the level of detail on the Dragster is easily on par with the likes of MV Augusta or Ducati, You could even argue it's in some ways better. Taking this into account, the Dragster is exceptionally good value for money. Some people have said it's a bit expensive for a scooter, but the Dragster is so much more than a scooter. Its automotive artwork driven by a true passion for innovation and design.

    These days we find many manufacturers sharing components, copying other people's designs or simply rebadging otherwise identical vehicles. So it's a real breath of fresh air to see a new scooter that is entirely bespoke, except for the Piaggio engine that powers the new Dragster.

    The original Dragster was considered by many as one of the best scooters ever made. Well, it's back and ready to take its throne back. To me, it also signifies one final hurrah before we are all forced to go electric. 

    Long live the King!
    Excerpt from Bobby Becks.


    SBF
    We’ve just had word that Cardo Systems is giving us an upgraded line of Bluetooth communicators – and the word on the street is that these puppies can now be updated completely wirelessly. Now we finally have more details on these products and they will be arriving in Singapore some time in January 2022 through Cardo's exclusive distributor - Chong Aik International Pte Ltd!
     
    Cardo is distributed exclusively in Singapore by Chong Aik International Pte Ltd

    45 Desker Road, Singapore 209576
    Phone: (+65) 6294 2532/1
    Open on: Mon-Fri: 09:00am-06:00pm / Sat: 09:00am-05:00pm
    Be sure to check back here on SingaporeBikes.com for when we get our hands on the first sets of Cardo's new product range dropping January 2022!
    Cardo Systems’ pedigree in wireless com devices stretches as far back as the first decade of Y2K when they started selling the world’s first wireless Bluetooth earpieces for early cellphones under the brand name “Scala”. 

    The viral success of these little Bluetooth units launched the company into their present brand name and current successes – the most recent press release of which flaunts two new entry-level offerings. 

     
    Spirit + Spirit HD
    Download full technical detailed specification here:
    Cardo SPIRIT
    SPIRIT _press guide.pdf
    Cardo Sprit HD
    SPIRIT HD_press guide.pdf


    General
    *1-2 Riders*
    Talk Time
    10 hours (13 for HD model)
    Range
    0.25 miles (0.4 miles for the HD)
    Charging Time
    Up to 2 hours talk time after 20 minutes of charging
    Standby Time 
    10 Days
    Compatibility
    Universal
    Operating Temperature
    -4 Farenheit to 131 Farenheit (-20 Celsius to 55 Celsius)
    Software Updates
    Over-the-air updates
    USB cable updates
    Device Settings
    Cardo Connect App
    Other Features
    Waterproof
    FM Radio (HD version only)
    Operating frequencies 76-108 MHz RDS – Radio Data systems 6 preset station memory Dimensions
    Speakers
    Diameter: 32mm | Depth: 10mm
    32mm (40mm HD for the HD)
    Main Unit
    Height: 47mm | Length: 78mm
    Depth: 19mm | Weigh
    Freecom 2X + Freecom 4X
     
    Download full technical detailed specification here:
    Cardo Freecom 2X
    Freecom 2x press guide.pdf
    Cardo Freecom 4X
    FREECOM 4x press guide.pdf

    General
    *1-2 riders, 1-4 riders for the 4X*
    Talk Time
    10 hours (13 for 4X)
    Range
    0.5 miles (0.75 miles for the 4X)
    Charging Time
    Up to 2 hours talk time after 20 minutes of charging
    Standby Time 
    10 Days
    Compatibility
    Universal
    Operating Temperature
    -4 Farenheit to 131 Farenheit (-20 Celsius to 55 Celsius)
    Software Updates
    Over-the-air updates
    USB cable updates
    Device Settings
    Cardo Connect App
    Other Features
    Waterproof
    FM Radio (HD version only)
    Operating frequencies 76-108 MHz RDS – Radio Data systems 6 preset station memory Dimensions
    Speakers
    Diameter: 32mm | Depth: 10mm
    40MM JBL
    Main Unit
    Height: 47mm | Length: 78mm
    Depth: 19mm | Weigh

    Be sure to check the new additions to the lineup on Cardo Systems’ official website; in the meantime, stay tuned for a review on one of these units, and as always – stay safe on the twisties.

    SBF
    When Honda first teased the bike – that eventually came to be known as the CB200X – everyone one, including me, got a little too excited hoping for an entry-level adventure bike. However, that is not what this is as it is a CB after all and not a CRF or NX. While Honda’s CB range is quite extensive, they are mostly meant for the road. However, this one has a little X in its name and let me tell you what that’s all about.

    Honda CB200X: design

    The X, in this case, has resulted in some big cosmetic changes. Firstly, they’ve added a semi-fairing that looks the part and the front end borrows heavily from the CB500X, with sharp lines and long shrouds on both sides. The 200X also gets a windscreen that looks nice and does a fairly decent job of wind protection while giving the motorcycle a taller stance.
    More ADV-like touches come in the form of knuckle guards that have the LED turn indicators neatly integrated – something you find in exotic ADVs like the Ducati Multistradas. Honda has also made sure the fairing flows nicely with the fuel tank and that has resulted in changes to the outside of the 12-litre tank. This CB also has a redesigned belly pan, but it is made of plastic and is purely a cosmetic element. From the rear, the bike looks identical to the Hornet 2.0 with the unique X-shaped LED tail-light.
    Honda CB200X: features

    Sadly, there haven’t been any additions to the features list and the bike still uses the simple digital display that’s missing Bluetooth connectivity. Like on the Hornet 2.0, this negative LCD display has five levels to adjust brightness, two trip meters, a battery voltage meter and a gear-position indicator. The hazard light switch is quite useful, to be sure, but it turns off when you switch the ignition off. The CB200X is also missing features like a USB charging socket or a more practical touring-style grab rail with easy luggage mount points.

    Honda CB200X: handling and ride

    The handlebar has been raised 61mm and brought closer to the rider by 50mm. The seat is about 23mm longer and padded differently to aid comfort – it sits slightly higher at 810mm as a result. The foot peg placement wasn’t too aggressive on the Hornet 2.0, which is why it works in this format. I quite like the upright riding position and feel it works rather well with the easy-going nature of this bike. The taller handlebar results in the front-end feeling slightly less connected, but it is a small price to pay for the added comfort that comes with this riding position. The bike also sifts through traffic well and doesn’t feel big or cumbersome.
    The CB200X is 5kg heavier than the Hornet, but at 147kg, it is still very light and hasn’t lost its agility. The block-pattern tyres will probably help to an extent on rough terrain, but the grippier Maxxis tyres that the Hornet comes with would have been better. With 167mm ground clearance, the CB200X can definitely do some mild off-roading, but to the same extent as the Hornet as the suspension and wheel sizes remain unchanged. However, if you plan on taking it off-road a lot, it’d be best if you remove the main stand as it hangs a bit too low.

    The ride quality is similar to the Hornet’s and is set-up slightly firmer than most sub-Rs 2 lakh Hondas. The front does have some give, but the rear could have been slightly softer in this application. Slowing this bike down does require a good pull at the brake lever but it gets the job done. The X gets single-channel ABS, like the Hornet, but a switchable system would have been nice at this price point. However, this does mean that you can slide around the rear wheel for fun.
    Honda CB200X: engine and gearbox

    As for the engine, it’s the same air-cooled, two-valve unit as the one on the Hornet 2.0. We had the opportunity to test that bike a few months ago and it took 14 seconds to get to 100kph – not a class-leading number – but it isn’t bad. Given that this is the same bike underneath, albeit slightly heavier, we can expect similar performance.

    The 200 in the name is a bit misleading because this is still a 184.4cc motor. Nevertheless, this engine sounds refined at idle, but a bit stressed as you get higher in the rev range. That being said, the vibrations are well isolated and you get hints of them through the foot pegs near the redline. Like on the Hornet, the CB200X’s punchy low and mid-range is enjoyable. Despite missing a six-speed gearbox, it does around 95kph without feeling like it’s working too hard, but anything above 110kph is when it starts to struggle.
    It may look like a long-distance tourer, but like its naked sibling, the city is where this powertrain excels. The engine is tractable and lets you carry very low speeds than you are used to, in higher gears. Pair that to the light clutch and you have a really good motorcycle to take on traffic.

    Honda CB200X: should you buy one?

    The Honda CB200X is now available at motorcycle dealers here in Singapore, though no word from official Honda distributor Boon Siew Honda yet. We suspect being an India domestic model, the CB200X will not be something we see being sold through the authorised channels. Initially sensing in the market, with COE at an almost all-time high of S$9,601, there is quite a premium placed on the Honda CB200X hovering at around S$16,000-S$18,000 on the road. While that is quite a gap for similar equipment, it does buy you additional road presence thanks to design elements like the proportionate fairing, the windscreen and the neat knuckle guards. You are also seated in a more upright and comfy manner and that certainly has its advantages as well. Ultimately, these are the reasons to consider buying this motorcycle.
    Honda CB200X Review:
     


    SBF
    All pictures and write up courtesy of Ducati Singapore (Wearnes).
    Last week, Ducati Singapore did a trial run of our ever-popular breakfast ride.
    A short ride to stop by our local "Eiffel Tower" and to end off the morning with some proper breakfast at Baker and Cook @ Faber Drive.
    Looks like the team at Ducati Singapore are ready for 2022 Breakfast Rides!
    The ride was organised in compliance to Covid-19 regulations.













    SBF
    The recently announced agreement between Taiwan's largest motorbike brand KYMCO and American motorcycle maker Harley-Davidson on the development of electric motorcycles will create a mutually beneficial partnership, KYMCO Chairman Allen Ko (柯勝峰) said Thursday.

    "As the car and motorcycle industry faces a critical turning point, this first-of-its-kind partnership in the business of motorcycles will create a new dimension in the electric motorcycle market," Ko said at a press conference in Taipei.
    KYMCO Singapore authorised distributor: Motorsport Pte Ltd

    KYMCO Singapore
    Blk 3006 Ubi Road 1, #01-350, Singapore 408700
    Tel: +65 6281 9778
    On Dec. 13, Harley-Davidson announced a plan to list its electric motorcycle division LiveWire on the New York Stock Exchange through a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC), with KYMCO and Harley-Davidson each investing US$100 million under their agreement.
    "LiveWire's mission is to be the most desirable electric motorcycle brand in the world," said Harley-Davidson Chairman and Acting CEO Jochen Zeitz in a pre-recorded video shown at the Taipei press event.

    It is a historic milestone for LiveWire because it will become the first publicly traded electric vehicle (EV) motorcycle company in the United States, Zeitz said.
    Once the transaction is finalized, Ko said, KYMCO is expected to own a 4 percent stake in LiveWire and play a role as a strategic partner. Harley-Davidson will hold 74 percent of the shares once LiveWire is listed, it said.
    Ko said KYMCO and Harley-Davidson can tap into each other's very different resources and strengths to build a shared EV platform through LiveWire, creating synergies for both enterprises.
    According to Ko, KYMCO and Harley-Davidson both have strong influence in the market despite their different brand positions, regional strengths, products, distribution and research and development.

    These differences will enable the two companies to build an optimal EV platform, as they work together to develop different products for their own brands, while sharing their at-scale manufacturing capabilities, Ko said.
    For KYMCO, the partnership will help elevate the Taiwanese brand's image and exposure to a higher level, and create more possibilities for its own electric motorbike business, Ko said.

    According to Harley-Davidson, the transaction is expected to close in the first half of 2022, but is subject to approval by shareholders of AEA-Bridges Impact Corp., the SPAC formed for the purposes of effecting mergers, share exchanges, asset acquisitions, share purchases, reorganizations or similar business combinations with target businesses.
    First published on Focus Taiwan

    SBF
    Get connected on-the-go for your next ride with #CARDO FREECOM 1+ and CARDO FREECOM 4+ Duo (Sound by JBL) and get them for less with our exclusive in-store promotion!

     
    ❗❗ CARDO FREECOM 1+ NOW $129.35 (U.P. $199.00) PLUS FREE CARDO Polo Tee ❗❗ ❗❗ CARDO FREECOM 4+ DUO (Sound by JBL) NOW $403.00 (U.P. $620.00) PLUS FREE CARDO Jacket ❗❗ 🛍️ Promo valid only in STORES!
    📅 Valid from 10 DEC 2021 - 13 DEC 2021
    🛍️ Visit our promo deals for more info at: https://www.chongaik.com.sg/content/9-promotions

    As Cardo’s SOLE AUTHORISED DISTRIBUTOR in Singapore, @ChongAik provides:
    ✅ 3-Year Warranty (For Packtalk Black)
    ✅ 2-Year Warranty
    ✅ 1-to-1 exchange (For parts deemed faulty not due to wear and tear)
    *With proof of purchase: Invoice
    Try the CARDO Freecom 1+ and CARDO Freecom 4+ Duo (Sound by JBL) with Chong Aik, the SOLE AUTHORISED DISTRIBUTOR at:
    Helmets & Apparels Showroom
    📍 45 Desker Road, Singapore 209576
    ☎️ +65 6294 2532/1
    🕘 9am-6pm | Mon-Fri
    🕘 9am-5pm | Sat
    Powerstar Motor P/L
    📍 151 Jalan Besar, Singapore 208869
    ☎️ +65 6392 5803
    🕘 10:50am-7:30pm | Mon-Sun

    SBF
    Article credits: Motorcycle News
    Who is the new Yamaha R7 for? You could say it’s for older riders who’ve ridden the tidal wave of sportsbike evolution, but want to get off, now that race reps have become too cramped, powerful and expensive. 

    Yamaha's Singapore authorised distributor:

    Hong Leong Corporation - Yamaha Motor Singapore
    Address: 178 Paya Lebar Rd, Singapore 409030
    Phone: 6749 0588
     WhatsApp to ENQUIRE now! Special price for SBF members! 
    If that’s the case, is a 72bhp parallel twin really going to cut the mustard on the road and track, or be enough for bragging rights down the pub?
    Or will the R7 be for newer, younger sportsbike fans, who haven’t had anything made for them in donkey’s years, except for the long-in-the-tooth supersport bikes that now no longer exist for the road? 
    But will it give them the kind of thrills we had back in the day when we discovered the joy of our first big bike? One thing’s for sure, they won’t mind that Yamaha has dug up the old R7 name, or remember it from the first time around, anyway.
    In fact, the Yamaha R7 is for everyone and neatly proves you don’t always need lots of power and tech to enjoy yourself. 
    Sporty, friendly and with a voracious appetite for corners, it’s the perfect machine for new riders to start their sportsbike journey when it’s full licence time. 
    Its relative lack of straight-line performance and basic spec may put some off and the brakes could be better, but the R7 is all about the purity of riding while not scaring yourself silly. It’s well built, handsome and comfortable, but best of all affordable: half the price of an R1, twice as fun on the road.
    Ride quality & brakes

    The R7’s tubular steel frame is the same as the MT-07’s with more weight shifted to the front for extra feel tipping into corners. New ali side plates around the swingarm pivot to add rigidity.

    KYB upside down forks are fully adjustable (rebound in right leg, compression in left) with a cast ali top yoke and forged ali bottom. They’re spaced 20mm wider than the MT-07’s and 5mm closer to the steering stem. Spring weight (18N/mm) is the same as the R6’s. Rake is steeper, from the MT-07’s 24.7 to° 23.5° (both run the same 90mm trail) and wheelbase reduced 5mm to 1395mm.
    The shock is adjustable for preload and rebound damping (no compression) and fitted with a new rising rate linkage, lifting the rear for a sportier stance.
    New four piston front brake calipers are now radially mounted with a 16mm Brembo master cylinder and ABS. Lightweight 10-spoke wheels, taken from the new MT-09 are shod with Bridgestone S22 sports rubber, 120/70 x 17 front and 190/55 x 17.
    It’s 4kg heavier than the MT-07, thanks to its extra plastics and that’s despite a one-litre smaller fuel tank and 1.1kg lighter battery.
    The R7 is comfortable…for a sportsbike. Clip-ons are still low to weight the front end and the pegs relatively high to keep them from grazing tarmac, but they’re nowhere near as extreme as a traditional race rep. Knees aren’t squashed, the seat is generously padded (and 15mm lower than the old R6 perch) and there’s decent wind protection. Even the mirrors work well.
    Your view down to the cockpit is trademark ‘R’ and if it wasn’t for the fact the R7 feels so light (just 188kg fuelled and ready to go) and nimble, you could be fooled into thinking you were astride an R1 or R6. The top yoke mimics Yamaha’s superbike, you get a snazzy 4.5 colour dash and neat, simple switchgear.

    Handling-wise the R7 comes from good stock. The MT-07 has always been nicely balanced, if a little bouncy at the limit, but with its beefed-up suspension, brakes, faster steering and fatter, stickier rubber the new Yam is so sure-footed and forgiving there isn’t much that’s going to get away from you on the road, if you know how to peddle. The R7’s superpower is corner speed – letting the brakes off, railing though at full lean and not having too much power to worry about the other side.
    Yamaha have honed the R7 so well there’s very little to complain about, except the brakes. The hardware is all there: twin discs, powerful four-piston radial calipers and a Brembo master cylinder with a superbike-style adjustable front brake lever, but the way the Japanese firm set their ABS robs the set-up of feel. It’s not just the R7 that suffers from this, the all-singing R1’s brakes are just as remote and wooden at the lever.
    On track the R7 initially feels flat, but bear with it, because the harder you push it the more exciting it becomes. Fit stickier rubber and with more grip than power (and even with its slightly soft rear shock spring), you need to be pushing incredibly hard to make a dent in its abilities. Best of all, without having big power to control you can take liberties with the throttle at big lean angles without worrying about launching yourself to moon.
    Riding with other R7 gets laugh out loud emojis floating from your crash helmet, but here’s the thing: in the real world that’s going to be hard to do. At a trackday you’ll always be in with faster bikes, regardless of the group, resulting in the cat and mouse of your corner speed versus their top speed. Sometimes that would be fun, sometimes terrifying.
    If trackdays, one day, had groups for these new generation middleweight twins that would be another (extremely entertaining) story and would see the class really take off. If you can’t wait for that Yamaha plan to run R7 Cup championships all over the world if you fancy bashing fairings with like-minded lunatics.

    You'll be able to race your 2022 Yamaha R7 in the R7 Cup
    Engine

    Yamaha have left the MT-07’s four-valve 689cc parallel twin virtually untouched for its new life in the R7. It still makes [email protected] and 49ftlb of torque at 7750rpm and has a more direct throttle cam, but it slips through Euro5 thanks to new ECU and injection settings, tweaks to the intake ducts and exhaust. 

    The six-speed gearbox remains, but now has an ‘Assist and Slipper’ clutch for a lighter lever action (by a third) and to prevent rear wheel hop into corners. Gearing is slightly taller with a one-tooth smaller rear sprocket (now 42) and combined with its superior aero Yamaha claims an 8% faster top whack than the MT-07. 
    We’d expect to see around 130mph when we speed test it.
    We reckon the 2022 Yamaha R7 top speed is around 130mph
    Unlike a highly strung race rep, everything about the Yamaha easy. The gearbox and clutch are light, accurate and the motor’s power is delivered smoothly, even at low-rev town speeds. Its torque curve is so flat and controllable you certainly never miss not having traction control.
    Being a Euro5-friendly parallel twin it’s exhaust note won’t go down as one of the greats, but on the flip side the 270-degree crank gives your ears a nice, dark V-twin-like warble to listen to when it’s working hard and is muted enough not to annoy the neighbours when it’s not. But stick a race pipe on it and you’ll be able to hear it in the next county.
    If you’re used to something with a lot more power, the Yamaha will feel steady at first and lacks the insane, warp speed punch of a superbike or supersport weapon up top, but that would be missing the point and one of the reasons those monsters don’t sell anymore. The joy of riding the R7 comes from welding the throttle to the stop and not slowing down for corners. Think of it like the early 90s 250cc two-strokes and 400cc four-strokes we oldies grew up with or for the yoof: a sharper, moderately more powerful version of your A2 licence bike.

    Ride the Yamaha with a bunch of mates on similar sized machines and suddenly sportsbikes become a riot on the road again.
    Just like the MT-07 it’s based on the R7 punches well above its weight. Keep it singing and you quickly realise 72bhp is more than enough for the road and on track will easily wheelie off the clutch in second, especially with no electronics to get in the way of your fun. 
    It’s easy to gather speed and keep up momentum, but everything happens more slowly than on a more powerful bike, so it’s never taking you for a ride or needs super-human levels of effort, skill and commitment to control.
    Reliability & build quality

    If it’s going to be anything like any of the three-generations of MT-07 that stretch back to 2014, which it is, the R7 will be mechanically bombproof. MCN’s owners’ reviews give nothing but glowing reports, aside from the occasional spot of rust on swingarm welds and durability of thin paint.
    Watch out for thin paint and rust on swingarm welds
    Value vs rivals

    Yamaha aren’t the first to create a more real world sportsbike. Aprilia’s RS660 stole the headlines when it was released in 2020.
    The Yamaha R7 has plenty of rivals in the real-world sportsbike class
    As you’d expect from the company that brought you the RSV4 and Tuono V4 it’s a more serious take on the theme. The parallel twin is sharper and more powerful (99bhp) than the R7 and comes with fully adjustable suspension and superbike shaming electronics, but it’s also nearly two grand more expensive.
    There’s also the inline four-cylinder Honda CBR650R and Kawasaki Ninja 650 twin, but neither have the unashamed sporty DNA of the Aprilia or Yamaha.
    Equipment

    If you’re used to the glitz of an all-singing sportsbike the R7’s modest level of chassis equipment won’t be as tempting as if it had shiny Öhlins, chunky Brembos and a raft of electronics. If it did the price would shoot up and defeat the point of what Yamaha is trying to do.
    It may not have all the bells and whistles, but fit, finish and build quality are excellent for the money and looks every inch a mini-me YZR-M1 MotoGP bike with its tank gills, M-shaped central air scoop and slender, angular bodywork that’s slipperier than Yamaha’s R125, R3 and R1.

     
    You also get ABS and 4.5in colour dash that contains info like speed, gear position and fuel gauge are nicely prominent, but they’re hard to read in direct sunlight.
    Official Yamaha performance, touring and cosmetic goodies are available, as well as accessory packs, which you can view on their online configurator. Racers and serious trackday riders can also choose from a full range of tasty GYTR accessories as illustrated below.



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