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Gasohol 95 in Thailand


ganman
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In January 2007, Gasoline 95 will be replaced with Gasohol 95 in Thailand. Just wondering how it is going to affect all of us who love going up north. Regular 91 will be available for a few more years.

 

I don't want to try the gasohol in the middle of nowhere in Thailand and get stuck with a "broken" bike. :giddy:

 

Anyway, it should be fine to use with FI bikes right? Although there is an article which I read (link below) which says it's alright to use it. Still not really sure if should try.

 

Anyway, tried it on their bike before?

 

http://www.geocities.com/bkkriders/gasohol.html

http://www.geocities.com/sg_fazer/earth.JPG
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i have used on my EFI bike before. so far so good, no loss of power or knocking on the engine.

 

but do take a look at the under-mentioned article extracted from Phuket Gazette:

 

The Fuel Research Department of the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT) researched the use of gasohol only in fuel-injected engines. We are therefore not sure whether the seals in carburetors - as in pre-1995 cars and as still fitted to most motorcycles - can handle the burning of ethanol. Carburetors contain plastic parts. If these are damaged and leak, an engine fire could result.

 

:help:

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  • 2 months later...

found this informative Gasohol Link, look into page 9.

Simon Soh

It's not the destination we conquered but ourselves.

 

Chiang Saen, Land of Golden Triangle

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5254/5500744953_52f8f8de37.jpg

26th Dec 05' - 9th Jan 06' Northern Thailand Trip

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  • 3 weeks later...

Gasohol-95 to replace octane-95 next year

 

Starting on January 1, 2007, millions of vehicles running on octane-95 gasoline, including 24 million motorcycles and large cars, will have to shift to gasohol-95, as the country's energy authorities implement their strategy to ensure a sufficient supply of the fuel.

 

 

The Energy Ministry's Energy Business Department will in November issue a regulation banning the sale of octane-95, giving oil retailers a month to unload their octane-95 gasoline inventories, estimated at about 11 million litres.

 

 

From January 1, the operators of any station selling octane-95 gasoline will be subject to a maximum fine of Bt100,000, or one year in prison, or both."We expect the regulation to be announced in the Royal Gazette in November, and to take effect on January 1," said Panich Pongpirodom, director-general of the department.

 

 

The regulation ends all doubts as to whether the premium gasoline will be cleared out of the market. The doubts had arisen due to concerns over the supply of ethanol, and the number of cars on the road manufactured before 1995. Gaso-hol, a mixture of ethanol and gasoline, was generally believed to be incompatible with cars more than 11 years old.

 

 

Panich said PTT Plc and the Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency Department had test-run older cars for 80,000 km. So far, no problems had been detected with the engines, he said.

 

 

As for the supply of ethanol - which would be mixed with gasoline at a ratio of 10:90, replacing an imported chemical called MTBE - the ministry said it would invest in a depot that would stock up to 30 million litres of the additive, said Boonsong Kerdklang, deputy director-general of the Energy Policy and Planning Office.

 

 

At present, local ethanol plants' combined capacity is 400,000 litres per day, while it is estimated that 800,000 litres would be needed daily if octane-95 sales are to be banned.

 

 

"The 30 million litres would be enough during the transition period. This should stabilise the price and provide enough for one month's consumption," Boonsong said, adding that the ministry plans to review the domestic production and imports. The inventory cost would depend on the ratio of locally produced and imported ethanol.

 

 

Promoting gasohol is part of the government's plan to reduce the national energy import bill. Aside from the octane-95 ban, the Energy Business Department will also restrict the opening of gas stations that distribute liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), better known as cooking gas, which has grown in popularity among taxi drivers and general motorists in the wake of rising oil prices.

 

 

In a bid to encourage people to shift from cheaper but more dangerous LPG to natural gas for vehicles (NGV), the department is prepared to offer a 50-per-cent discount on the annual car registration fee for all NGV-driven cars and a 25-per-cent discount for cars that run on a combination of oil and NGV.

 

 

While these policies were being drafted over the past eight months, fuel consumption has declined steadily. On average, daily diesel consumption dropped from 55.6 million litres in 2005 to 50.9 million this year. In August, diesel consumption slumped to 46.2 million litres.

 

 

Meanwhile, during the eight months, average daily gasoline consumption dropped from 20.1 million litres to 19.6 million.

 

 

Fuel imports in the period also eased 1.5 per cent from 854,000 barrels a day last year to 842,000 barrels.

 

 

However, the import value rose 25.3 per cent to Bt522 billion, due to the appreciation in oil prices. In the period, Thailand also earned Bt36 billion from crude oil exports and Bt81 billion from refined oil exports.

 

Energy Reporters

 

 

The Nation

OLD NO GO, NEW NO COME.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Article on the BKK Post....

 

"Plan to stop petrol sales still on track

But gasohol safety remains in question"

 

http://www.bangkokpost.net/Business/12Oct2006_biz33.php

 

Was in BKK last month and completely relied on Gasohol for my fazer 6. So far no problems on my bike. The pump attendents were encouraging me to pump regular gasoline but I was insistant on trying out Gasohol. So far no problems on my bike.

http://www.geocities.com/sg_fazer/earth.JPG
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Originally posted by Pauche@Oct 13 2006, 09:53 AM

care to share more details????

:confused:

 

 

you heard, he hear, who confirm? :confused:

 

Heard from the Magdaco group, one of the VFR800 PGM-FI become no power after pump in Gasohol....

 

I also not sure, thats why asking around, (my bike also PGM-FI) .... :sweat:

** Be smart, ride safely, stay legal **

 

Please read the << Street Smart >> thread.

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most of the gasahol related problems arise from 85/15 ratio. thailand afaik is on 90/10 which do not seem to have much hooha afaik. anyhow, the main concern remains for carb vehicles as it is said to potentially make rubber swell, crack, etc. under prolonged periods. efi bikes have no float bowl with rubber o-rings like the carb so it will not cause any adverse effects. some claim power loss, etc. but could be purely psychological unless someone publish scientific results or performs a blind man test.

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Originally posted by MrLau@Oct 13 2006, 09:50 PM

Heard from the Magdaco group, one of the VFR800 PGM-FI become no power after pump in Gasohol....

 

I also not sure, thats why asking around, (my bike also PGM-FI) .... :sweat:

there were 4 Honda VFR800-"PGM-FI" in the Northern-Thailand Ride early this year, but so far no probs with using the Gasohol 95 leh.... and i'm one of those....

 

hope this clears the issue untill more empirical evidence can prove otherwise...

 

jus my 2 cents worth... :smile:

http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e73/ChrisCheong8800/TMAX-3.jpg

 

http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e73/ChrisCheong8800/DSC_3871-1.jpg

 

'Old ladies in the Midwestern US...now have to pay higher taxes to finance...Wall Street's Maseratis. That's horribly immoral - and bad economics.'

 

Jim Rogers-19/20/08

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Originally posted by [email protected]@Oct 14 2006, 12:51 AM

there were 4 Honda VFR800-"PGM-FI" in the Northern-Thailand Ride early this year, but so far no probs with using the Gasohol 95 leh.... and i'm one of those....

 

hope this clears the issue untill more empirical evidence can prove otherwise...

 

jus my 2 cents worth... :smile:

ya lor tat time u all pump also bo taichi mah

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Guest pauche13
Originally posted by [email protected]@Oct 14 2006, 12:51 AM

there were 4 Honda VFR800-"PGM-FI" in the Northern-Thailand Ride early this year, but so far no probs with using the Gasohol 95 leh.... and i'm one of those....

 

hope this clears the issue untill more empirical evidence can prove otherwise...

 

jus my 2 cents worth... :smile:

ya lo..... tat time u pump also bo taichi

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is Gasohol 95 equivalent to 92 here in singapore?:confused:

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"But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. Now if you know what you're worth then go out and get what you're worth."

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Originally posted by ProjectD@Oct 15 2006, 07:23 PM

is Gasohol 95 equivalent to 92 here in singapore?:confused:

different.

 

. What is Shell Gasohol 95?

 

 

 

Shell Gasohol 95 is the petrol resulting from the blend of lead-free gasoline with 10% of ethanol or ethyl-alcohol, which is 99.5% pure alcohol, as a substitute for MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether).

 

 

 

Shell Gasohol 95 contains a special formula that helps clean the fuel injection system making it possible for complete combustion. As a result, it keeps the engine clean and maintains top engine performance.Motorists can fill up with Shell Gasohol 95 at more than 360 Shell service stations nationwide.

 

 

2. What is MTBE?

 

 

 

MTBE is an abbreviation of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether. It’s an octane booster for Gasoline 95.

 

 

3. How does Shell Gasohol 95 help reduce air pollution?

 

 

 

Fuel mixed with Ethanol is certified by EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) in the US that can help reduce emission of Hydrocarbon and Carbon monoxide by 30% of which helps reduce air pollution.

 

 

 

4. What vehicles can fill up with Shell Gasohol 95?

 

 

 

The updated list of vehicles that can fill up with Shell Gasohol 95 is coming soon.

 

 

5. Why did Shell launch “Shell Gasohol 95 quality guarantee” campaign?

 

 

 

Even though Gasohol 95 is 1.50 baht per litre cheaper than gasoline 95, the number of Gasohol 95 users is still only 30% compared to 70% who use gasoline 95. This is because most customers have little confidence in Gasohol 95. Shell has over 25 years of experience in the global Gasohol market in countries such as USA Brazil and Sweden. Shell is a leading retailer of Gasohol in the world offering trouble-free motoring to millions of customers every month. We have full confidence in the product quality control process and can, thus, offer such a guarantee. We believe this campaign will give a correct understanding to motorists and, as a consequence, a greater number would turn to Shell Gasohol 95.

 

 

 

The launch of this campaign can be of a support to a government policy in motivating motorist to use Gasohol in order to cut down oil imports at the time where oil price is hiking. Shell Gasohol 95 is 1.50bht/ltr cheaper than ULG 95. You can fill up Shell Gasohol 95 at service stations nationwide with “Shell Gasohol 95” Sign.

pos·er (pozr) n.

A Sportbike rider who habitually pretends to be something he is not and only care about how they appear to the public as their bikes are nothing more than props to get them noticed by girls or even teenage boys which they want to impress with fictional tales of all the hardcore riding they do.

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Good news for all

 

Gasohol implementation date changed

 

Review fuel taxes and allow choice

Policymakers agreed yesterday to suspend plans to phase out 95-octane petrol in favour of gasohol, pending a review of the country's alternative energy strategies. Authorities cited concerns over ethanol supplies, the quality of gasohol and its suitability for use in local cars.

 

Premium petrol had been set to be banned starting from the new year under the policy, initiated by the Thaksin government, to promote gasohol as a cheaper, more environmentally-friendly alternative.

 

But the strategy, while sound policy, had been marred by poor execution from the start. Auto manufacturers had pointedly refused to join government efforts to reassure motorists that their engines would be fully compatible with gasohol, resulting in considerable uncertainties about the new fuel. Classic car enthusiasts warned of costly damage if premium fuel was unavailable, while economists and environmentalists challenged the potential cost-savings and efficiencies to be gained from the strategy.

 

Gasohol, a blend of 90 per cent petrol with 10 per cent ethanol, is touted as one of a number of new strategies promoted worldwide to help improve fuel efficiency and reduce dependence on petroleum. Crude oil prices, which hit highs of $80 per barrel in July, have since fallen to around $60, but the long-term trend looks decidedly poor for oil consumers given declining supplies and growing demand. Oil dominates the country's imports in value terms, and Thailand suffers to a greater extent than other countries in the region from increases in oil prices due to our poor efficiency in the use of power.

 

As one of the world's largest agricultural exporting countries, exploring the use of biofuels is certainly sound policy. Ethanol can be produced from both sugar cane and tapioca, two of the country's largest crops, although production capacity remains less than half the 800,000 litres per day needed if gasohol replaced premium petrol.

 

Gasohol on its own does not necessarily mean cheaper fuel for motorists. Indeed, depending on the direction of commodity and crude oil prices, gasohol could be more expensive than petrol.

 

But gasohol would help the country reduce its dependence on imported crude oil, boosting the country's trade accounts and economy. Increased domestic demand for ethanol would also help boost agricultural commodities prices and create a new market for local farmers. Yet it makes little sense to force alternative fuels on consumers, particularly when uncertainties remains regarding their value and benefit. Addressing the safety and quality concerns of the consumer will be critical for the future success of alternative fuels in Thailand.

 

Rather than eliminate premium petrol altogether, tax rates for fuel and vehicles should be reviewed to encourage the use and development of more efficient cars. Tax rates on fuel in Thailand are extraordinarily low for an oil-importing country. Raising taxes and pump prices would be a powerful motivation for consumers to minimise their driving and consider cheaper, more efficient mass transit alternatives. Excise taxes for the auto industry, currently based on engine size and vehicle type, should also be restructured to reward efficient cars and punish gas-guzzlers.

 

The infrastructure megaproject programme should also be accelerated to help expand existing mass transit systems and give the public an affordable, convenient alternative to the use of personal vehicles for transportation. The country's supply chains are overwhelmingly dependent on lorries, which are significantly less efficient for cargo transport than boat or train.

 

In Bangkok and other urban areas, fuel efficiency is significantly lowered for automobiles due to traffic congestion - expanding the country's road networks and considering more radical traffic control measures would help raise average speeds and reduce fuel consumption.

At the beach for Loy Krathong

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Just an info for all.... I was told by the local that they will not be changing all to gasohol.... no matter what, you will still find gasoline in thailand.....

 

how to tell which is which??

 

The one on the left is gasoline, It is easy to remember.. My way of remembering is, gasoline character in thai looks something like the english letter " I U U something U" . So I always go for that. I will not go wrong.... take a look...

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f118/kw_bike/Everything/DSCN5085.jpg

 

Not all gas station has gasoline... so.. i always go for PTT. They confirm have gasoline...

 

This is a pix of gasohol. Which is easier to tell as there is english....

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f118/kw_bike/Everything/DSCN5086.jpg

 

 

I hope it helps.... :smile:

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This thread is started for those who like to know, especially whether there is 95 available for carb model bike riders.

Kindly update when possible by cutting and pasting

 

Province----------Location-----------------Brand---Date-------95---Gasohol 95------91

 

1.Krabi-------Route 4 North just-----------PTT---03Nov06----Nil------24.03-----24.89

----------------after turn off to

----------------Krabi town

 

2.Krabi-------Route 4 South just---------ESSO--10Nov06--25.87----24.02------24.91

---------------after turn off to

---------------Krabi town

 

3.ChaChoengSao-------------------------JET-----24Dec06----Nil------25.05------25.75

---------------Route 304 East of BKK

Thanks 4 d updates Pauche

 

4.Arranyapathet--Route 33--------------???-----24Dec06----26.71---25.21------25.91

Town next to Cambodia border of PoiPet

Thanks 4 d updates Pauche

 

5.Chantaburi-----Route 3---------------Shell-----02Jan07----26.67---25.17------25.17

Provincial Capital between Cambodia

border of Koh Kong and Thai city of Pattaya

Thanks 4 d updates Pauche

At the beach for Loy Krathong

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

not a plm getting normal RON 91 & 95 petrol in whole of Thailand, a fair percentage of them serve gasohol & completely gasohol.

 

usually there will be sevral pump station easily available in all province, if u cant get it on the 1st station then go to the next or the next next, sure can get, wont be a plm.

 

FYI, most station close before sun set, not many have 24hrs operation. fill up ur tank before u call it the ride for the day.

Simon Soh

It's not the destination we conquered but ourselves.

 

Chiang Saen, Land of Golden Triangle

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5254/5500744953_52f8f8de37.jpg

26th Dec 05' - 9th Jan 06' Northern Thailand Trip

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  • 2 weeks later...
Originally posted by PaLmEr@April 22, 2007 02:59 am

Regular Unleaded 95 is still readily available in Thailand as of April 2007

For Gasoline 95, can look for Esso.

 

Look for the sign in Thai language which looks like "gwesh 95". It means Supreme Gasoline 95.

 

 

 

:cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

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