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Originally posted by gohjohan@Jul 14 2006, 10:55 AM

Universal Motors should have at least the '06 version.

 

I didn't know Stamford Tyres also does motorcycle tires. I know they also have the nitrogen fill up for tyres and they charge for cars. I dunno about bikes.

 

I should get tubeless tyres for my bike too. I think it's going to be bald before my next long trip!

Not sure about that, afterall its the demand that command the supply. No harm taking a look at Universal.

 

It is Stamford Motor and not Stamford Tyre. By the way, I am talking about the rim and not tire. :sweat:

 

Yup. Stamford Tyre does provide the service for nitrogen gas at $20 for a set of car tires.

 

Well, I don't know. If you wish for a vintage looks, it would be nice to keep the spoke wheel. Otherwise, sport rim does serve a better purpose for touring sake.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by nguyenht@Jul 14 2006, 11:24 AM

HELP on Reserve Fuel Switch....

 

Ok this sounds silly, but I don't know what to make of the three positions of the Reserve Fuel Switch on my Shadow 400 (recently acquired). From what I can see, I think it looks like this:

 

OFF

 

RES

 

ON

 

1) So where should the switch be when I am riding normally?

2) Where should it be when I am filling up?

3) When the bike starts to sputter, where should the switch be put to?

 

Lastly, the main fuel tank capacity is about 12-13 liters. What kind of mileage (or is it kilometerage) are you all getting per liter?

 

Thanks.

1) The switch should be set to ON.

2) It does not matters.

3) Res

 

The tank is of 14L would give you a rough range of 220km to 280km depending on riding condition and habit.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by cak@Mar 10 2006, 01:13 AM

i would like to know from u guys what's the market price like for a Honda Shadow 400 American Classic Edition. This is because i'm intending to purchase one which is an FS plate. Thanks.

The price depends on the seller and the potential buyer.Got two FS plate Shadow Slashers sold for $5K last year and beginning of this year. For ACE, if the condition is good and very well maintain with 'young age' it can be as high as 5K and above.

 

Again, it depends on demand and how much the buyer willing to pay. Even got ppl got the cheek to call and challenged me my selling of my Slasher weeks back, asking why i sell at that certain price and why not to sell at the price bikeshop is taking in my bike... I think he is a crappy loh...You see seller always hope to fetch a good selling price and buyer hope for lowest. Nothing wrong, this is human nature. They can negotiate but not to challenge one another's decision. Price not right, then forget it lor. :faint:

 

Bike shop's take-in price can be quite deceiving as they tends to push the value to minimum and some even may say "Only worth the remaining COE value" BullSh#T i would say.

 

Sometime luck plays a big part in getting your love bike. :smile: The buy price for a FS plate ACE should also depend how much you wanted to pay, your budget how much the seller willing to let go. Of course, to pay $10K is definately out of question for me, unless it got all the value that you wanted and you happily paying for.

 

I hope this can give you some hint when getting your bike. Wish you get a good and beatifully done up Shadow ACE with good price.

Practice make perfect....But since Nothing is perfect, Why practice so hard? by Cowboy Wong....

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I didn't know I already in love with my Slow Little Greenie until recently almost selling her away...how can like that? :faint:

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Originally posted by nights@Jul 8 2006, 10:54 AM

1st gear - 15km/h

2nd gear - 35km/h

3rd gear - 50km/h

4th gear - 70km/h

5th gear - 90km/h

 

This is quite interesting as I have been riding my Shadow 400 for a couple of weeks now. I find that:

 

1st gear - 35km/h

2nd gear - 65km/h

3rd gear - 80km/h

4th gear - 90+ km/h (cruising)

5th gear - never (on Singapore Roads????)

 

I am dragging I know, but I don't feel that I am getting much out of the bike if I shift at 15, 35, 50, etc as Nights does. Is there something wrong with my engine perhaps? Or is it my speedometer? or is it my hearing and sense of touch?

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Hi nguyenht,

 

What I quoted was what I felt is the best fuel efficiency within the torque range for each gear. You could drag the gear to get better pickup, but you would probably be spending more on fuel consumption unnecessary.

 

When I first gotten my Shadow 400, I did precisely like what you have did and found out that fuel consumption is just way to ridicules. Of course, I would contribute this sight as part of my short distance traveling which is barely 5km a day and occasionally traveling range of 70km a day. Not that I wanted to attribute dragging is bad for your engine, but the heat generate could shoot up your engine temperature easily and may cause the lifespan of your clutch to be shorten.

 

Of course, this is just speculation of my view as I had only experience this symptom on oil and air cooled single cylinder engine.

 

During the procession of the Shadow 400, I had did on many occasions travel up north full throttled and to this date, the new owner still find the engine running good.

 

 

Regards.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by nights@Jul 18 2006, 03:15 PM

When I first gotten my Shadow 400, I did precisely like what you have did and found out that fuel consumption is just way to ridicules.

Hi Night,

 

Thanks for the advice. I will keep myself in check.

 

Also.. I have been keeping tabs on my fuel efficiency in the last couple of weeks. It was at 12.5 km/L which is marginally better than my car (which averaged about 10 km/L). I kept meticulous record of my car's mileage and have 3.5 years worth of fueling data and km used between each fueling. I plan to do the same for the Shadow.

 

My question (to everyone actualy) is what is considered "good", "ok" or "ridiculous" for the Shadow. My first bike (long ago) was a Yamaha SR 125 and I think I got at least 20km/L out of it.

 

Cheers....

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Originally posted by nguyenht@Jul 19 2006, 01:05 AM

Hi Night,

 

Thanks for the advice. I will keep myself in check.

 

Also.. I have been keeping tabs on my fuel efficiency in the last couple of weeks. It was at 12.5 km/L which is marginally better than my car (which averaged about 10 km/L). I kept meticulous record of my car's mileage and have 3.5 years worth of fueling data and km used between each fueling. I plan to do the same for the Shadow.

 

My question (to everyone actualy) is what is considered "good", "ok" or "ridiculous" for the Shadow. My first bike (long ago) was a Yamaha SR 125 and I think I got at least 20km/L out of it.

 

Cheers....

12.5 KM/L !? :bow: This is extremely bad! You should send your motorbike in for a detailed check. The worse I ever did on my Shadow 400 is around 20 KM/L and the best, 30 KM/L.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by nights@Jul 19 2006, 01:19 AM

The worse I ever did on my Shadow 400 is around 20 KM/L and the best, 30 KM/L.

How did you manage to keep it to 30 Km/L? 20 Km/L is quite average but 30 Km/L? :bow:

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Originally posted by gohjohan@Jul 19 2006, 09:35 AM

How did you manage to keep it to 30 Km/L? 20 Km/L is quite average but 30 Km/L? :bow:

Well, it happens after I added in STP Octane Booster. I was just telling Raymond the other day about it and he bought a bottle to try it on his Royalstar. Not sure if it work for his bike, but it sure does on mine. Anyway, I only tried 2 bottles since I figure out that mileage increased does not justify for the money well spend. I felt better spending the $11.50 on petrol rather than on additives.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by nights@Jul 14 2006, 01:40 PM

The tank is of 14L would give you a rough range of 220km to 280km depending on riding condition and habit.

Hey Night...

 

According to your post above, the range I should be at is about 15.7KM/L (220km/14L) to about 20.0KM/L (280km/14L).

 

I will keep on monitoring. I have only had 2 fillings since I have had the bike. Let's hope there is not a leak somewhere!

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Originally posted by nguyenht@Jul 19 2006, 12:36 PM

Hey Night...

 

According to your post above, the range I should be at is about 15.7KM/L (220km/14L) to about 20.0KM/L (280km/14L).

 

I will keep on monitoring. I have only had 2 fillings since I have had the bike. Let's hope there is not a leak somewhere!

That is right. The range I given is based on information provided by owners of Shadow 400 before 2004 version thus, I do not want to speculate my own mileage instead as what I had was a Shadow 2004 version. From what I have gathered, there is some slight changes on the rpm range on the 04' to set itself apart from its previous model. However, one of our forum member, Seanwu did achieve better than 280km full tank. Hope he is reading this posting and able to give some insight to you as well.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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yeah, the fuel consumption for your Shadow 400 should average about 20km/l.

 

12.7km/l is too drastic, its as it you have to stop every red light.

 

Cheers for all Shadow riders.

 

Shall we arrange for a kopi session sometimes?

learning to be a better rider.

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Originally posted by dreamwalk@Jul 19 2006, 05:55 PM

yeah, the fuel consumption for your Shadow 400 should average about 20km/l.

 

12.7km/l is too drastic, its as it you have to stop every red light.

 

Cheers for all Shadow riders.

 

Shall we arrange for a kopi session sometimes?

Hi, the kopi session also for ex-Shadow rider?

Anyway, my average miles was 22km/l. And I rode my Shadow with low rpm, i.e. change gear early...

VT250Z / Steed 400 / Dragstar 400 /Shadow 400 / VMax 1200

1992 -----1996--------1999-----------2003-----------2006 ..|

 

//ameblo.jp/grassmere

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In 1996 Japan bobber steed 400, very nice

MY Pass ride 1983 Yamaha 125LC 1991 TZR125.88 yamaha...YZ125.91KX125 1986 Kawa.KDX200 1987 HondaCG125/1980 HondaCB400N/1965 Vespa/1996Ducati Monster.98WR200R

1.87 Toyota EP70 1.0/1.3/1.5(SG)2.90 FC RX7 1.3(Au) 3.90 Celica GT4 2.0T(AU)4.1983 mazda 323 1.0(AU)5.1984 Honda Jazz 1.2(M)(AU)6.78Honda civic(Au)7.85Honda Jazz 1.2(A)(Au)8.1989'"Ford TX3turbo1.6(AU)9.94" SKYLINE R33 (AU)10.83-911RS3.2(AU)11.1992 Toyota soaror GT2.5T(AU)12.1994toyota corrolla 1.6(AU)13.1992suzuki swift 1.0(AU)14.1984Civic3dr 1.2(Macau)15.1988 toyota corrolla 1.6(SG)16.1988 MB380SE 3.8(SG)17.1982 VW Goft MK1 1.6/2.0(SG)18.2003-WRX 2.0(SG)19.1965 Mini(SG)20.1997 subaru vivio(SG)21.1996 Mirca LX(SG)22.1987 MB280SE(SG)

Current ride>22.96MB E200(SG)23.02HONDA MOBILIO(SG)03'Road King (SG)07'W400(SG)91'883XL.Beetle Cabrio

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I am riding a Year 2004 Shadow Aero 750 with a box (the rider 90 kg). With travelling speed about 85 - 95 km/h, the mileage that I commonly get is about 25 km/l. I guess the petrol consumption is not be too much different from a shadow 400. What I don't understand is why a 750 cc bike can achieve the petrol consumption of a 400 cc bike?

 

Anyone care to share on this?

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Originally posted by teanotcoffee@Aug 14 2006, 10:09 PM

I am riding a Year 2004 Shadow Aero 750 with a box (the rider 90 kg). With travelling speed about 85 - 95 km/h, the mileage that I commonly get is about 25 km/l. I guess the petrol consumption is not be too much different from a shadow 400. What I don't understand is why a 750 cc bike can achieve the petrol consumption of a 400 cc bike?

 

Anyone care to share on this?

I was asking myself the same question too.

 

From what I understand, the throttle is electronic. Yup, electronic. I think you know this as I do. For throttle response, you have to gradually open it, not open it full and expect a surge of power. During that time when throttle is opened, the micro computer calculates the amount of fuel to be let released, so to speak.

 

Since the fuel is controlled, the consumption is lower than other bikes of its class. I think the Shadow 400 throttle isn't computerised, so the throttle is quick response and the fuel released is not controlled.

 

Here's an extract taken from the Australian '04 Honda Shadow 750 website

 

An increase in compression compared to its predecessors combines with new computerised ignition timing maps linked to the carburettor's new throttle sensor to contribute to a stronger feeling of performance and acceleration. And while peak power was reduced slightly compared to its earlier iterations, performance is noticeably stronger throughout the engine's powerband, particularly in its low-to-midrange rev range, where easy-going cruiser riders prefer to spend most of their riding time. High revs and peak power figures are simply not what cruising is about, though the engine's retuned performance and lower transmission ratios combine with a quiet and smooth shaft drive to deliver a deeply satisfying surge of acceleration at every twist of the wrist.

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Originally posted by teanotcoffee@Aug 14 2006, 10:09 PM

I am riding a Year 2004 Shadow Aero 750 with a box (the rider 90 kg). With travelling speed about 85 - 95 km/h, the mileage that I commonly get is about 25 km/l. I guess the petrol consumption is not be too much different from a shadow 400. What I don't understand is why a 750 cc bike can achieve the petrol consumption of a 400 cc bike?

 

Anyone care to share on this?

Allow me to explain and correct Jo-Han on the computerized ignition mapping for throttle sensor part as well.

 

Both models 400cc and 750cc shared the same overall specification except for the engine capacity and physical dimension. This mean to said, the computerized ignition mapping for throttle sensor is the same for both models. One of the contribute reason to why the 750cc version consume less fuel is due to lower rpm for each gear. At lower rpm, the 750 could well reach a speed limit of the 400, which is running at a higher rpm. Revving at high rpm seriously burn out fuel faster than anyone could imagine and in a long-term highway traveling, it could seriously wear out your engine faster.

 

 

400cc 750cc

3.166 2.400 1st gear

2.000 1.550 2nd gear

1.500 1.173 3rd gear

1.173 0.960 4th gear

1.041 0.851 5th gear

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by dreamwalk@Aug 14 2006, 11:35 PM

nights, what bike u riding huh??? i saw u at rosli on thurs.. cool bike with 2 long pipes. lol

I am riding a Kawasaki Vulcan 2000. Which Thursday is it? I must be getting old, as I don't remember visiting Rosli these past few weeks, but nonetheless thanks for your compliment. :cheeky:

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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Originally posted by gohjohan@Aug 15 2006, 09:31 AM

the micro computer calculates the amount of fuel to be let released, so to speak.

a little something more... find out more about carbs here.

 

The fuel is controlled by any micro-computer/CDI. That only happens in Fuel Injected (FI) bikes.

 

Non-FI bikes have carbs to control the fuel/air intake.

- Constant Velocity carbs -> Your throttle controls the air intake which controls the fuel slide/intake (think venturi effect).

- Slide carbs -> Your throttle controls the fuel slide/intake which controls the air intake.

 

Throttle sensor basically sends signals to your CDI to control the plug firing at certain throttle positions to optimise combustion.

 

In addition to the explanation from Nights about fuel consumption, another significant part could be because of the bike's design. Both the shadow 400 and 750 share exactly the same body frame (for the chain driven that is) which could contribute to its significantly larger power to weight ratio. With a bigger power plant, the torque should be sufficient enough to pull the bike at a much lower rpm.

 

Now, who can explain how a Harley Sporster 1200 can get 22km/l while touring at speeds >140km/h with intermediate "whacking" of the throttle to speeds of 190km/h? :confused:

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Thanks to Johan and Nights for your explaination on the fuel consumption. When I bought my 750, I thought it will consume more fuel than the 400 version. Apart from more expensive road tax and insurance, no other complains. This is a good bike if you are looking for style and easy riding.

 

I guess there are not many Shadow Aero 750 owners in Singapore besides Johan and myself. There may be less than 5 such bikes on the road in Singapore.

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No worries teanotcoffee. Thank you for the link to CV carbs, William. That explains a lot of things about the throttle response.

 

For '04 Shadow Aero 750 owners, it could be just me and you, teanotcoffee. I don't know if they are any others.

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Now, who can explain how a Harley Sporster 1200 can get 22km/l while touring at speeds >140km/h with intermediate "whacking" of the throttle to speeds of 190km/h?

 

Capacity of an engine determines the power that it will and can create. So layman terms means the bigger the engine capacity, the more power you can extract from it. On the other hand, due to the increase in its cylinder size, combustion required would also be increased. Therefore here would be the first place to look for in regards to expanded fuel increases.

 

Then considering the amount of power that the motorcycle has, the difference would be on the technical side. Such as weight/load that the engine is hauling, the resistance the motorcyle's dimensions goes against. Simply said, as tiny as a small wheel bearing not cooperative can also result in resistance against the engine. Oh by the way, poorly inflated tires will also result in higher fuel consumptions.

 

To add, no motorcycle manufacturers will make their machines exact duplicates of the competition. 22km/l while touring at speeds interests you? I have a suggestion - get your hands on the motorcycle, strip it down then checked its gearing ratios. If I'm lucky I might just be lucky here. (I believe they won't call it sportster if it's gonna be carrying standard specifications)

 

By the way, please don't let the owner know I am the one suggesting this.:cheeky:

"I EAT,

BREATHE,

SLEEP,

RIDE, TALK, DREAM,

LIVE AND LOVE

MOTORCYCLES"

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