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WTS: Royal Enfield Continental GT 535 2015 - A Hideo Kojima Colourway


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Hi guys,

 

Aiming to sell my Continental GT 535. I've ridden it for a year and a half-ish. Loved every minute of riding it but I have to let it go. :(.

 

What I did;

Lowered handlebars (can be restored to original position easily)

Hitchcock Motorcycle's Motad Exhaust + Header (Not legal. I will give you the original exhaust as well)

Pillion seat (stock doesn't come with the pillion seat, but I will give you the single seater one for more a 'cafe racer' look as well.)

Exhaust wrap (looks)

Classic-ish signal lights

K&N Air Filter

I think i've spent more than 2K on just parts alone. I will include these in the purchases alongside the stock parts.

 

So you have the option of going full stock or just using my parts. But I intend to sell as a whole and not loose.

Bike serviced every 3000km.

 

Selling Price - $14K

Registered - May 2015.

COE - May 2025.

 

You can contact me at 91500616 if you have any questions and I will reply as soon as I can. I am rarely here too.

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